politics

Political parties more polarized than voters

The nation is no more politically divided than it was in the 1970s, despite how things might appear in the news. Instead, the political parties have sorted into narrow groups.

Bolstering alliances in a changing world

U.S. foreign policy should focus on strengthening, not weakening, its worldwide alliances, said Kori Schake, a Hoover Institution research fellow. That is especially true if the United States seeks to avoid conflict with China, the top challenger to the current international order.

Hoover scholars tackle some of the most urgent issues of our time

The Hoover Institution’s nearly 200 fellows, who range from renowned thought leaders to emerging scholars, continue the think tank’s long tradition of addressing issues ranging from climate change and economics to foreign policy and national security.

Iran nuclear deal worth keeping, Stanford experts say

Stanford experts say upending the Iran nuclear deal would stymie U.S. efforts to solve the North Korean nuclear crisis, isolate America on the world’s stage and strengthen hard-liners in Iran.

Stanford scholar assesses Catalonia referendum

Francois Diaz-Maurin, a visiting scholar at the Center for International Security and Cooperation, analyzes Catalonia’s referendum attempt, the Spanish government’s response and the impact these events could have across Europe.