politics

How Iraqis used rumors as resistance against Saddam’s regime

Using documents in the Hoover Institution archives, Stanford political scientist Lisa Blaydes examined life in Iraq under Saddam Hussein, including how Iraqi citizens found creative ways to resist the Baath Party’s authoritarian regime.

Poll shows consensus for climate policy remains strong

A new study shows that Americans overwhelmingly want a reduction in global warming and support renewable energy development. But according to the data, Americans don’t realize how many people share their beliefs.

Student politician goes cross-country

ASSU Senator Matthew Wigler, ’19, is taking a road trip this summer to America's swing districts to learn about the voters who reject partisanship in a time of great political polarization.

Study examines how corruption is concealed in China

A study by Stanford scholar Jennifer Pan shows how citizen complaints posted publicly online in a Chinese city are concealed from upper-level authorities when they implicate lower-tier officials or associates connected to lower-tier officials through patronage ties.

Poll: Women and independent voters critical for the midterm election

A new poll of California voters by Stanford University’s Bill Lane Center for the American West shows that despite its reputation as a liberal state, the California political profile is mixed and diverse. Appealing to female voters and appealing to independents are pivotal this election season.

Welfare opposition linked to threats of racial standing

Research co-authored by sociologist Robb Willer finds that when white Americans perceive threats to their status as the dominant demographic group, their resentment of minorities increases. This resentment leads to opposing welfare programs they believe will mainly benefit minority groups.