politics

The diplomacy of denuclearization

In anticipation of President Donald Trump’s second face-to-face meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un later this week, Stanford scholars discuss what unfolded since the leaders’ first summit in June 2018 and what direction they should take to ensure complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

What U.S. suspension of nuclear arms treaty means

U.S. suspension of the INF Treaty allows Russia to develop and deploy missiles that can travel between 3,000–5,500 kilometers, according to a scholar with diplomatic experience. While the U.S. is also developing intermediate-range missiles, where it could deploy them is unclear.

Outlining U.S. diplomatic vision in North Korea

Stephen Biegun, the U.S. Special Representative for North Korea, spoke at Stanford University Thursday on opportunities and challenges toward the final, fully verified denuclearization of North Korea.

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies —

Venezuela has one president, but two claim the office

In a Q&A, Harold Trinkunas, deputy director of FSI’s Center for International Security and Cooperation, discusses the contested election.

What’s next for Brexit?

Stanford researcher Christophe Crombez breaks down the withdrawal negotiations of Brexit, the British exit from the European Union.

Explaining the surge in populist, politics movements today

Stanford political scientists Francis Fukuyama, Anna Grzymala-Busse and Neil Malhotra discuss why populist messages have emerged in contemporary politics and how they have evolved into larger, political movements.