Social Sciences

Why ‘Find your passion!’ may be bad advice

The belief that interests arrive fully formed and must simply be “found” can lead people to limit their pursuit of new fields and give up when they encounter challenges, according to a new Stanford study.

Study examines how corruption is concealed in China

A study by Stanford scholar Jennifer Pan shows how citizen complaints posted publicly online in a Chinese city are concealed from upper-level authorities when they implicate lower-tier officials or associates connected to lower-tier officials through patronage ties.

Welfare opposition linked to threats of racial standing

Research co-authored by sociologist Robb Willer finds that when white Americans perceive threats to their status as the dominant demographic group, their resentment of minorities increases. This resentment leads to opposing welfare programs they believe will mainly benefit minority groups.

Numbers about inequality don’t speak for themselves

In a new research paper, Stanford scholars Rebecca Hetey and Jennifer Eberhardt propose new ways to talk about racial disparities that exist across society, from education to health care and criminal justice systems.

Artificial intelligence in the workplace

Artificial intelligence offers both promise and peril as it revolutionizes the workplace, the economy and personal lives, says James Timbie of the Hoover Institution, who studies artificial intelligence and other technologies.

How artificial intelligence is changing science

Artificial intelligence is now part of our daily lives, whether in voice recognition systems or route finding apps. But scientists are increasingly drawing on AI to understand society, design new materials and even improve our health.