Social Sciences

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies —

Q&A: Coronavirus outbreak and health policy implications

Asia health policy expert Karen Eggleston weighs in on the evolving coronavirus outbreak, China’s response and the international health implications.

Introducing the Human Screenome Project

Millions of screenshots sent from personal devices every five seconds will transform our understanding of everything from fake news to depression.

Future of U.S./Iran relations

Stanford scholars warn that instability in Iraq and Arab Gulf states would be the result of continuing conflicts between the United States and Iran.

Pathways to changing the minds of climate deniers

By reviewing the psychology behind climate change rejection, a Stanford researcher suggests four approaches that can sway climate deniers and help overcome obstacles to implementing solutions.

It’s not your phone, it’s you

Stanford communication scholar Gabriella Harari finds that it’s personality that influences how people use their digital devices; technology is just a medium to channel our everyday behavior, says Harari in a Q&A with Stanford News Service.

Helping asylum seekers at the U.S.-Mexico border

In a new Spanish immersion class, senior Lily Foulkes and other Stanford students applied their language skills to helping detained Spanish-speaking asylum seekers in Texas prepare for credible fear interviews.

Getting a read on low literacy scores

With new results from two major exams revealing that U.S. students fall far short of expected literacy skills, Stanford education researcher Rebecca Silverman weighs in on the debate about how to teach kids to read.

The silent cost of school shootings

SIEPR’s Maya Rossin-Slater finds the average rate of antidepressant use among youths under age 20 rose by 21 percent in the local communities where fatal school shootings occurred.