Ecology & Environment

Biodiversity research at Stanford

Truly grasping the importance of biodiversity means diving down into the microscopic organisms in our soils and out to human social relationships affecting our ecosystems. The more we know, the better we can address threats to species diversity.

Climate change research produced reasons for concern and hope in 2018

In 2018, climate scientists and energy researchers at Stanford not only documented the devastating effects of climate change on the world, but also developed new technologies to help reduce carbon emissions and considered strategies to keep societies safe as the climate continues to change.

Q&A with Steve Palumbi on saving coral

Heeding a growing call for action, a committee of scientists scrutinized every tool available to save coral reefs and described a wealth of possibilities.

Q&A: Tracking the history of El Niño

With the recent forecast of El Niño as a high possibility this winter, a Stanford researcher weighs in on how reconstructing past weather events using coral reefs can help demystify this complex phenomenon.

A glimpse into future oceans

Volcanic carbon dioxide vents off the coast of Italy are rapidly acidifying nearby waters. This natural laboratory provides a crystal ball-view into potential future marine biodiversity impacts around the world.

Virtual reality aids in environmental education

Stanford researchers took a virtual reality experience into a variety of educational settings, including high school classrooms, to test the impact on awareness and understanding of ocean acidification.

Reflections on the California wildfires

The 2018 fire season in California gave Stanford experts much to think about, including how the state can develop better policies for preventing fires and new research to better understand the long-term effects of breathing smoky air.

Drying Canadian wetland drives muskrat decline

Over the last half-century, Canada’s Peace-Athabasca Delta has been slowly drying out. A new study shows this loss of habitat is likely responsible for the decline of semi-aquatic muskrat, and could have larger implications.