Ecology & Environment

Treating tapeworm infection could improve academic performance

Tapeworm infection from eating contaminated pork can damage the brain, causing learning impairments and possibly enforcing cycles of poverty. A new study is the first to look at infection rates within schools and propose solutions targeting children.

Students explore the complexities of creating energy

Students who joined the Sophomore College course Water and Power in the Pacific Northwest: The Columbia River traveled to the Columbia River valley to understand the interplay between water, energy and human populations.

New credits make carbon capture profitable

With recent tax credits and other policies, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it underground is not only possible but profitable for U.S. biofuel refineries.

Swarms of tiny organisms churn ocean waters

Massive swarms of tiny oceanic organisms like krill create enough turbulence when they migrate to redistribute ocean waters – an effect that may influence everything from distribution of ocean nutrients to climate models.

Stanford Law —

Rolling back green energy standards?

Stanford Law Professor Deborah Sivas explains California’s waiver that allows it to set stricter fuel standards and the possibility of litigation to prevent the Trump administration’s new measures.  

Case questions climate change culpability

A closely watched federal trial pitting two cities against major oil companies has taken surprising and unorthodox turns. Stanford researchers examine the case, which could reshape the landscape of legal claims for climate change-related damages.

Aquatic mammals need to be big, but not too big

Examining body sizes of ancient and modern aquatic mammals and their terrestrial counterparts reveals that life in water restricts mammals to a narrow range of body sizes – big enough to stay warm, but not so big they can’t find enough food.