Ecology & Environment

Costa Rican president speaks at Stanford

The president described a vision for his country to become an ethical example to the global community. He also spoke with Stanford researchers directing conservation and sustainable development initiatives in Costa Rica.

Tunas, sharks and ships at sea

Researchers combine maps of marine predator habitats with satellite tracks of fishing fleets to identify regions where they overlap – a step toward more effective wildlife management on the high seas.

Natural climate solutions aren’t enough

Protecting carbon sinks, such as forests and wetlands, is key to slowing climate change, but only part of the puzzle, Stanford researchers say. Reducing emissions is still essential for meeting global climate goals.

Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences —

Polar vortex: The science behind the cold

An atmospheric scientist discusses how the polar vortex works, what drives its behavior and why it seems to bring storms and bitter cold more frequently than in past decades.

Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences —

The double-edged sword of palm oil

Widespread cultivation of oil palm trees has been both an economic boon and an environmental disaster for tropical developing-world countries.

Biodiversity research at Stanford

Truly grasping the importance of biodiversity means diving down into the microscopic organisms in our soils and out to human social relationships affecting our ecosystems. The more we know, the better we can address threats to species diversity.

Climate change research produced reasons for concern and hope in 2018

In 2018, climate scientists and energy researchers at Stanford not only documented the devastating effects of climate change on the world, but also developed new technologies to help reduce carbon emissions and considered strategies to keep societies safe as the climate continues to change.

Q&A with Steve Palumbi on saving coral

Heeding a growing call for action, a committee of scientists scrutinized every tool available to save coral reefs and described a wealth of possibilities.

Q&A: Tracking the history of El Niño

With the recent forecast of El Niño as a high possibility this winter, a Stanford researcher weighs in on how reconstructing past weather events using coral reefs can help demystify this complex phenomenon.