Ecology & Environment

Hopeful signs despite growing carbon emissions

An international research team reports that the increase in global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels has resumed after a 3-year respite and may increase again next year. Despite the findings, improved energy efficiency and a booming renewables market provide signs of hope.

Ocean monuments face possible loss of protection

Federal regulators have indicated they may open some marine national monuments to commercial fishing. Researchers who have studied these and adjacent areas discuss their value and the potential impacts of a change in protected status.

Tracking mosquitoes with your cellphone

A simple recording of a mosquito’s buzz on a cellphone could contribute to a global-scale mosquito tracking map of unprecedented detail. All that’s required to participate is a cellphone to record and submit the buzz of a mosquito, which means almost anyone from around the world can take part in this work.

Q&A with Robert Waymouth on the future of plastics

Plastics are inexpensive and pervasive, but also degrade slowly and damage critical ecosystems. Stanford chemist Robert Waymouth discusses changes in incentives and technologies to create a more sustainable future for plastics.

Effects of rolling back the Clean Power Plan

Early October the EPA moved to roll back the Obama-era Clean Power Plan. Stanford legal and economic experts discuss this move and what it means for attempts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Animal biodiversity key part of carbon cycle

With abundant data on plants, large animals and their activity, and carbon soil levels in the Amazon, Stanford research suggests that large animal diversity influences carbon stocks and contributes to climate change mitigation.

2017 Bright Award given to green energy innovators

The annual prize recognizes unheralded individuals who have made significant contributions to global sustainability. Andrij and Roman Zinchenko won for their work supporting and promoting sustainable energy innovation.

New portal for exploring California’s drought

A new web portal puts four years of California drought data into an interactive format, showing where regions met or missed water conservation goals. The idea is to motivate awareness and conservation.

Microbes in flower nectar affect pollination

Stanford’s community ecology lab has found that microbes in nectar can affect bird and insect interactions with the flowers and, as a result, whether they get pollinated.