Ecology & Environment

News articles classified as Ecology & Environment

Rethinking meat substitutes

Plant-based and lab-grown meat substitutes are here to stay, but are unlikely to eliminate livestock agriculture’s climate and land use impacts anytime soon, according to Stanford environmental scientist David Lobell.

Droughts increase costs for low-income households

According to a recent study, when providers act to curtail water use or invest in new infrastructure because of a drought, bills can rise for low-income households and drop for high-income households.

Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability —

Top 10 sustainability research stories of 2022

The Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability looks back at the research highlights from the units that came together to form the new school, which launched in September.

Stanford Earth Matters magazine —

COP27: How to reduce emissions and still feed the world

Stanford delegates co-hosted an event at COP27 highlighting the role cutting-edge research and solutions can play in decarbonizing the food and agricultural systems.

Solar panels largely confined to wealthy Americans

Tax rebates for installing residential solar power have done little to spur adoption in low-income communities in the United States, while a less common incentive seems to succeed, according to new research using AI and satellite images.

Dams and food security

Analysis finds that dammed reservoirs could store more than 50% of the water needed to irrigate crops without depleting water stocks or encroaching on nature. The researchers caution against building new dams, however, and urge consideration of alternative storage solutions.

Beaver dams buffer rivers against climate extremes

American beaver populations are booming in the western United States as conditions grow hotter and drier. New research shows their prolific dam building benefits river water quality so much, it outweighs the damaging influence of climate-driven droughts.

Cover crops can lower yields

Federal subsidies promote planting cover crops to store carbon in agricultural soils, among other benefits, but the approach as currently practiced can reduce yields in the U.S. Corn Belt, researchers find. Their analysis highlights the need to better implement the practice.

Climate justice

International negotiators will meet in Egypt this Sunday for the latest U.N. climate change conference. Stanford experts in a range of fields discuss issues likely to be in the spotlight, including compensation to developing countries for climate change-related damages.