Science & Technology

Swarms of tiny organisms churn ocean waters

Massive swarms of tiny oceanic organisms like krill create enough turbulence when they migrate to redistribute ocean waters – an effect that may influence everything from distribution of ocean nutrients to climate models.

Autonomous robotics class integrates theory and practice

Students programmed robots to autonomously navigate an unknown cityscape and aid in a simulated rescue of animals in peril in a class that mimics the programming needed for autonomous cars or robots of the future.

Paul Ehrlich on the problems of the modern jaw

Paul Ehrlich wants you to shut your mouth – for your health. According to Ehrlich’s new book, mouth breathing, among other modern habits, has led to an epidemic of small jaws and many troubling health consequences.

Friends of friends reveal our hidden online traits

Our online friends generally reflect our age, race or political views, but some traits, notably gender, have been easier to hide online – until Stanford researchers realized that our friends’ friends give our gender secrets away.

Algorithms reveal changes in stereotypes

New Stanford research shows that, over the past century, linguistic changes in gender and ethnic stereotypes correlated with major social movements and demographic changes in the U.S. Census data.

Stanford scientists track cancer growth with CRISPR

Cancer research that once involved years of painstaking work can now happen in months with a novel technique for systematically studying cancer-related genes. The results reveal how combinations of mutations influence tumor growth.

Case questions climate change culpability

A closely watched federal trial pitting two cities against major oil companies has taken surprising and unorthodox turns. Stanford researchers examine the case, which could reshape the landscape of legal claims for climate change-related damages.

Study reveals concussion’s complex nature

Concussion is a major public health problem, but not much is known about the impacts that cause concussion or how to prevent them. Bioengineer David Camarillo and colleagues suggest that the problem is more complicated than previously thought.