Science & Technology

News articles classified as Science & Technology

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Wildfire smoke exposure hurts learning outcomes

Pollution from wildfires is linked to lower test scores and possibly lower future earnings for kids growing up with more smoke days at school, a new study finds. Impacts of smoke exposure on earnings are disproportionately borne by economically disadvantaged communities of color.

Stanford King Center on Global Development —

Examining the marginalization of Muslims in India

Feyaad Allie, a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science, has spent the past several years studying discrimination against Muslims in India and how they have responded to their marginalization.

New 3D printer promises faster, multi-material creations

Stanford engineers have designed a method of 3D printing that is 5 to 10 times faster than the quickest high-resolution printer currently available and is capable of using multiple types of resin in a single object.

Stanford HAI —

Gamifying autism diagnosis and treatment

Video and audio data gathered by a smartphone game could facilitate earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and improve treatment.

Empowering private landowners to prevent wildfires

Controlled burning has proven effective at reducing wildfire risks, but a lack of insurance has dissuaded private landowners from implementing the practice. Policy expert Michael Wara discusses soon-to-be-enacted legislation that would pay for fire damages to neighboring properties in California.

Charging cars at home at night is not the way to go

The move to electric vehicles will result in large costs for generating, transmitting, and storing more power. Shifting current EV charging from home to work and night to day could cut costs and help the grid, according to a new Stanford study.

Wildfire smoke is unraveling decades of air quality gains

Stanford researchers have developed an AI model for predicting dangerous particle pollution to help track the American West’s rapidly worsening wildfire smoke. The detailed results show millions of Americans are routinely exposed to pollution at levels rarely seen just a decade ago.

Sifting through cellular recycling centers

A new method allows scientists to determine all the molecules present in the lysosomes – the cell’s recycling centers – of mice. This could bring new understanding and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.