Health

Lead poisoning of children

A remediation and public education effort at an abandoned battery recycling facility in Bangladesh eliminated most lead soil contamination, but levels of the toxic metal in children living near the site did not decrease nearly as much. The discrepancy reveals the scope of other lead exposure sources and the challenge they present to public health.

Linking piped water, health and gender equality

New Stanford research finds installing piped water in rural Zambian homes frees up time in the daily lives of women and girls, while also promoting economic growth and food security – making an argument for piped water infrastructure investments across rural, low-income areas.

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19

Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature.

Stanford Today —

Reimagining mental healthcare from the ground up

After being inspired by a Stanford course, four undergraduates teamed up to tackle important deficiencies in mental healthcare while expanding access and reducing costs.

What wastewater can reveal about COVID-19

A new wastewater testing approach capable of better detecting viral infection patterns in communities could prove a crucial step toward an informed public health response to diseases like COVID-19.

A look inside Stanford’s expanded Biosafety Level 3 (BSL3) lab

University photographer Andrew Brodhead takes us inside Stanford’s expanded Biosafety Level 3 (BSL3) lab. This type of lab is capable of handling microbes that can cause serious or potentially lethal disease through inhalation, such as SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19.

Most popular American movies depict an unhealthy diet

Stanford researchers examined the 250 top-grossing American movies of recent decades and found the on-screen foods and beverages largely failed U.S. government nutrition recommendations and U.K. youth advertising standards.

Microlab tests for COVID-19 in 30 minutes

Using “lab on a chip” technology, Stanford engineers have created a microlab half the size of a credit card that can detect COVID-19 in just 30 minutes.