Health

Bringing neuroscience to bear on addiction policy

Keith Humphreys founded the Stanford Network on Addiction Policy to help bring more science to debates over drug policy. He talked to Stanford News about why he started SNAP and how it works.

Leading with flavor encourages healthy eating

Most people want to eat healthier, but efforts to encourage healthy eating by providing nutrition information have not changed habits much. A new study suggests that labels emphasizing taste and positive experience could help.

Lead found in turmeric

Some spice processors in Bangladesh use an industrial lead chromate pigment to imbue turmeric with a bright yellow color prized for curries and other traditional dishes, elevating blood lead levels in Bangladeshis.

Satellites reveal peatland fire susceptibility

Fires in Southeast Asian peatlands release huge amounts of carbon, along with deadly smoke. Now, new satellite measurements of soil moisture may offer a promising approach to reducing those fires and their widespread haze.

Poverty as a disease trap

The realities of subsistence living in a region of Senegal hard hit by schistosomiasis make reinfection likely, despite mass drug administration. Stanford researchers find that engaging communities in the design of disease control programs could help.

Researchers probe microbiome-cancer treatment link

Immunotherapy has great promise as a cancer treatment, but current therapies only work in some. Now, Stanford researchers are testing the idea that microorganisms in our guts might be the deciding factor.

What it’s like to be a chemist

Laura Dassama and her fellow Stanford chemists talk about their paths into the field, the joys of making new molecules and the way in which the “central science” pervades our lives.

Wireless sensors stick to skin and track health

Stanford engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing. It’s all part of a system called BodyNet.