Ecology & Environment

Neighboring glaciers may cause each other to melt faster

Two of the most rapidly changing glaciers in Antarctica, which are leading contributors to sea-level rise, may behave as an interacting system rather than separate entities, according to a new analysis of radar data.

Stanford Law School —

The tax bill, climate change and ANWR

Stanford Law Professor Deborah Sivas discusses environmental implications of the GOP’s tax bill, including a provision to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling.

Vintage film offers new insights about Antarctica

Applying modern film scanning technology and machine learning to a rare trove of historical airborne radar measurements could provide new insights about how Antarctica’s ice sheets will change in a warming world.

Hopeful signs despite growing carbon emissions

An international research team reports that the increase in global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels has resumed after a 3-year respite and may increase again next year. Despite the findings, improved energy efficiency and a booming renewables market provide signs of hope.

Ocean monuments face possible loss of protection

Federal regulators have indicated they may open some marine national monuments to commercial fishing. Researchers who have studied these and adjacent areas discuss their value and the potential impacts of a change in protected status.

Tracking mosquitoes with your cellphone

A simple recording of a mosquito’s buzz on a cellphone could contribute to a global-scale mosquito tracking map of unprecedented detail. All that’s required to participate is a cellphone to record and submit the buzz of a mosquito, which means almost anyone from around the world can take part in this work.

Q&A with Robert Waymouth on the future of plastics

Plastics are inexpensive and pervasive, but also degrade slowly and damage critical ecosystems. Stanford chemist Robert Waymouth discusses changes in incentives and technologies to create a more sustainable future for plastics.