Science & Technology

Healing compounds in scorpion venom

Stanford chemists have identified and synthesized two new healing compounds in scorpion venom that are effective at killing staph and tuberculosis bacteria.

Finding and fixing natural gas leaks quickly and economically

From production to consumption, natural gas leaks claim lives, damage the climate and waste money. Research teams at Stanford are working on better ways to find and fix gas leaks quickly and inexpensively from one end of the system to the other.

AI tool helps radiologists detect brain aneurysms

With the help of an artificial intelligence algorithm developed by a team of Stanford medical experts and computer scientists, radiologists improved their diagnoses of brain aneurysms.

Edit video by editing text

A new algorithm allows video editors to modify talking head videos as if they were editing text – copying, pasting, or adding and deleting words.

How deep-ocean vents fuel massive phytoplankton blooms

A new study suggests vents in the seafloor may affect life near the ocean’s surface and the global carbon cycle more than previously thought. It’s the first to show how iron rising from beneath Earth’s crust stimulates massive phytoplankton blooms.

New process rinses heavy metals from toxic soils

Poisonous heavy metals contaminating thousands of sites nationwide threaten to enter the food chain, and there’s been no easy way to remove them. An experimental chemical bath and electrochemical filter could now extract heavy metals from the soil and leave fields safe.

Inexpensive chip-size satellites orbit Earth

A swarm of 105 tiny satellites the size of computer chips, costing under $100 each, recently launched into Earth’s orbit. Stanford scientist Zac Manchester, who dreamed up the ChipSats, said they pave the way for cheaper and easier space exploration.

A prosthetic foot that tackles tough terrain

Hiking trails and other rough terrain are especially difficult for people with prosthetic legs. Now, Stanford engineers have come up with more stable prostheses – and a better way to design them.

Solving geothermal energy’s earthquake problem

A geothermal energy project triggered a damaging earthquake in 2017 in South Korea. A new analysis suggests flaws in some of the most common ways of trying to minimize the risk of such quakes when harnessing Earth’s heat for energy.