Science & Technology

News articles classified as Science & Technology

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Solar panels largely confined to wealthy Americans

Tax rebates for installing residential solar power have done little to spur adoption in low-income communities in the United States, while a less common incentive seems to succeed, according to new research using AI and satellite images.

Dams and food security

Analysis finds that dammed reservoirs could store more than 50% of the water needed to irrigate crops without depleting water stocks or encroaching on nature. The researchers caution against building new dams, however, and urge consideration of alternative storage solutions.

Stanford Engineering —

The cleanest drinking water is recycled

New research shows treated wastewater can be safer and more dependable than common tap water sources, including rivers and groundwater.

Beaver dams buffer rivers against climate extremes

American beaver populations are booming in the western United States as conditions grow hotter and drier. New research shows their prolific dam building benefits river water quality so much, it outweighs the damaging influence of climate-driven droughts.

Cover crops can lower yields

Federal subsidies promote planting cover crops to store carbon in agricultural soils, among other benefits, but the approach as currently practiced can reduce yields in the U.S. Corn Belt, researchers find. Their analysis highlights the need to better implement the practice.

For a longer-lasting battery, make the most of each cell

The secret to long life for rechargeable batteries may lie in an embrace of difference. New modeling of how lithium-ion cells in a pack degrade show a way to tailor charging to each cell’s capacity so EV batteries can handle more charge cycles and stave off failure.

Stanford Engineering —

Oussama Khatib: What if Aquaman were a robot?

In this episode of The Future of Everything, Oussama Khatib talks about designing a humanoid robot with stereoscopic vision and opposable thumbs that can travel nearly a thousand meters below the surface.

Climate justice

International negotiators will meet in Egypt this Sunday for the latest U.N. climate change conference. Stanford experts in a range of fields discuss issues likely to be in the spotlight, including compensation to developing countries for climate change-related damages.