Science & Technology

Stanford Medicine —

Brain cancer growth halted by absence of protein

High-grade gliomas, a group of aggressive brain tumors, cease growing in mice if a signaling molecule called neuroligin-3 is absent or its activity is blocked with drugs, a Stanford team has shown.

New technique uses light to separate mirror-image materials

Left- and right-handed versions of molecules can be hard to tell apart but can have devastatingly different effects. The Dionne lab is developing an optical filter to sort these molecules, which could lead to purer and safer drugs and agrichemicals.

New portal for exploring California’s drought

A new web portal puts four years of California drought data into an interactive format, showing where regions met or missed water conservation goals. The idea is to motivate awareness and conservation.

Stanford researchers team up to reduce pollution and improve health

Brick kilns are ubiquitous in South Asia, as is the pollution they produce. An interdisciplinary team is now combining satellite data and political persuasion to track kilns, raise public awareness and incentivize kiln owners to use cleaner technologies.

Microbes in flower nectar affect pollination

Stanford’s community ecology lab has found that microbes in nectar can affect bird and insect interactions with the flowers and, as a result, whether they get pollinated.

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies —

New biosecurity initiative launched at FSI

A new biosecurity initiative at FSI is designed to protect public health from accelerating biological risks, both natural and manmade.

Sending excess heat into the sky

Stanford scientists cooled water without electricity by sending excess heat where it won’t be noticed – space. The specialized optical surfaces they developed are a major step toward applying this technology to air conditioning and refrigeration.

Stanford Medicine —

Bionic

How video goggles and a tiny implant could cure blindness.