psychology

Probing how Americans think about mental life

Most people don’t have answers to the big questions about consciousness or the meaning of life, but they do have a way of thinking about and categorizing mental life. It comes down to three things – body, heart and mind.

Change behaviors by changing perception of normal

In a study, people ate less meat and conserved more water when they thought those behaviors reflected how society is changing. The findings could point to new ways of encouraging other behavior changes.

Psychologists simplifying brain-imaging data analysis

Researchers at the Stanford Center for Reproducible Neuroscience are championing a new way of organizing brain-imaging data that they hope will lead to more transparency, more collaboration and ultimately a better understand of the brain.

Why online consumers choose inferior products

A Stanford study found that when choosing between two products online, people tend to favor products with more reviews despite the fact that the more-reviewed product is of lower quality.

Stressful times call for empathic people

In an era of nearly boundless online “friend” networks, Stanford researchers found that students are able to distinguish those real-life friends who are most able to help them deal with stressful times.

Graduate School of Business —

Achieving balance in work and life

The constant pull between career and family is stressing us out. Professor of Economics Myra Strober says it doesn’t have to be that way.

Americans misinformed about smoking

A Stanford study finds that despite Americans knowing that smoking can lead to deadly diseases like lung cancer, they underestimate those risks.