psychology

Try “distant socializing” instead

The same technologies that people once blamed for tearing society apart might be our best chance of staying together during the COVID-19 outbreak, says Stanford’s Jamil Zaki.

Babies love baby talk, all the world over

Stanford psychologist Michael Frank and collaborators conducted the largest ever experimental study of baby talk and found that infants respond better to baby talk versus normal adult chatter.

Consequences of perceiving God as a white man

Stanford psychologist Steven O. Roberts found that the characteristics U.S. Christians assign to God – e.g., male, female, black, white, old, young – are the same identities they attribute to a boss.

Young children have intuitions of great teachers

Even at a young age, children know that deciding what to teach is as important as knowing how to teach. This ability to instruct each other could explain why humans are so adaptable.

New patterns of brain development discovered

Neuroscientists had thought parts of the brain associated with reading and face recognition shrunk as children grow. In fact, they may be growing electrical insulation that makes their brains more efficient.

Leading with flavor encourages healthy eating

Most people want to eat healthier, but efforts to encourage healthy eating by providing nutrition information have not changed habits much. A new study suggests that labels emphasizing taste and positive experience could help.