psychology

Why ‘Find your passion!’ may be bad advice

The belief that interests arrive fully formed and must simply be “found” can lead people to limit their pursuit of new fields and give up when they encounter challenges, according to a new Stanford study.

How the human mind shapes reality

The mind can shape health, behavior and maybe even society as a whole. Stanford researchers are bridging disciplines to understand what our minds can do and how they do it.

Numbers about inequality don’t speak for themselves

In a new research paper, Stanford scholars Rebecca Hetey and Jennifer Eberhardt propose new ways to talk about racial disparities that exist across society, from education to health care and criminal justice systems.

Food rules positively influence teen food choices

Stanford researchers surveyed how adolescents make independent food decisions. They found that when teens have health-oriented food rules at home, they are more likely to eat healthier on their own.

Deep learning comes full circle

Artificial intelligence drew much inspiration from the human brain but went off in its own direction. Now, AI has come full circle and is helping neuroscientists better understand how our own brains work.

Infants expect favoritism over fairness

Stanford scholar Lin Bian found that in times of plenty infants expect fair distribution of goodies like toys or cookies. But when resources are scarce, infants expect people to favor their own social group.

Kids see words and faces differently from adults

A new study finds that young children’s brains have not yet fully developed the vision circuits they need to understand words and recognize faces, a finding that could help in understanding how children learn to read.

Mental rehearsal might prepare our minds for action

Mentally running through a routine improves performance, but how that works isn’t clear. Now, a new tool – brain-machine interface – suggests the answer lies in how our brains prepare for action.