psychology

Receiving genetic information can change risk

Simply learning of a genetic risk can alter a person’s physiology, a recent study found, causing people to perform less well on exercise tests or altering hormones that indicate fullness after a meal.

Changing how people perceive problems

Drawing on an extensive body of research, Stanford psychologist Gregory Walton lays out a roadmap to positively influence the way people think about themselves and the world around them. These changes could improve society, too.

Americans are not financially prepared for old age, study finds

A new report published by the Stanford Center on Longevity looks at the financial security of Americans at different life stages, with a focus on two key areas of economic stability: homeownership and retirement. Across generations, Americans are falling short.

Virtual reality can help make people more empathetic

Stanford researchers found that people who underwent a virtual reality experience, called “Becoming Homeless,” were more empathetic toward the homeless and more likely to sign a petition in support of affordable housing than other study participants.  

A doctor’s reassurance speeds healing

When doctors offer a few words of reassurance, patients suffering an allergic reaction begin to feel better more quickly. The finding by Stanford psychologists suggests that the placebo effect applies to words as well as to pills.

Why women stay behind the scenes at work

Avoiding backlash, feeling authentic and balancing work with family responsibilities are reasons women shared with Stanford researchers about why they opt to work on the sidelines.