Policy

Political parties more polarized than voters

The nation is no more politically divided than it was in the 1970s, despite how things might appear in the news. Instead, the political parties have sorted into narrow groups.

New approach to reducing gender inequality at work

A new approach for reducing gender inequality in the workplace has shown promise in a pilot project at several companies. It combines existing tools and adds an evaluation of places where biases could creep in to a company’s procedures.

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies —

What does the end of net neutrality mean for us?

Didi Kuo, academic research and program manager at FSI’s Program on American Democracy in Comparative Perspective, and Ryan Singel, media and strategy fellow at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society, provide perspective.

Winds of change for vertical axis turbines?

New research suggests vertical axis turbines, which may have fewer impacts on birds and the environment, could increase public support for new wind energy installations.

Hoover scholars tackle some of the most urgent issues of our time

The Hoover Institution’s nearly 200 fellows, who range from renowned thought leaders to emerging scholars, continue the think tank’s long tradition of addressing issues ranging from climate change and economics to foreign policy and national security.

Iran nuclear deal worth keeping, Stanford experts say

Stanford experts say upending the Iran nuclear deal would stymie U.S. efforts to solve the North Korean nuclear crisis, isolate America on the world’s stage and strengthen hard-liners in Iran.

Center for International Security and Cooperation —

At 90, William Perry is driven by vision of a nuclear-free world

When it comes to nuclear warfare and annihilation, few people alive have contemplated such tragic outcomes quite like William Perry, one of the world’s top experts on nuclear weapons.