Policy

More rain, less snow increases flooding

By analyzing more than two decades of data in the western U.S., scientists have shown that flood sizes increase exponentially as a higher fraction of precipitation falls as rain, offering insight into how flood risks may change in a warming world with less snow.

In a war perceived as just, many Americans excuse war criminals

Political scientist Scott Sagan finds that almost half of Americans are willing to allow a war crime – a massacre of innocent women and children – to go unpunished when they believe the act was committed by soldiers fighting for a just cause.

Open trade is crucial for innovation

At the Stanford China Economic Forum, Stanford scholars and international business leaders including Jonathan Levin, Jerry Yang and Neil Shen examined the benefits of China and U.S. collaboration.

The plus of ethnic enclaves and neighborhoods

A new Stanford study found that new refugees were more likely to find work within their first five years if officials assigned them to an area with a larger community of people who share their nationality, ethnicity or language.

Strategies to secure American elections

Stanford scholars outline a detailed strategy for how to protect the integrity of American elections – including recommendations such as requiring a paper trail of every vote cast and publishing information about a campaign’s connections with foreign nationals.

Strengths and weaknesses of the Green New Deal

The sweeping plan to overhaul transportation, energy and other sectors failed a recent U.S. Senate vote, but remains a political lightning rod. Stanford experts discuss the science behind the politics.

Benefits of informal health expertise

A new Stanford study tackles the issue of health inequality and examines the benefits of having access to informal health expertise by having a medical professional in the family.