Materials

First self-cooling fiber laser made with silica

Stanford researchers and a team of collaborators develop the first self-cooling optical fiber made of silica for laser applications and have quickly developed it into a laser amplifier – a critical step toward use in the real world.

Controlling chemistry with sculpted light

Using state-of-the-art fabrication and imaging, researchers watched the consequences of adding sculpted light to a catalyst during a chemical transformation. This work could inform more efficient – and potentially new – forms of catalysis.

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19

Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature.

Future VR could employ new ultrahigh-res display

Repurposed solar panel research could be the foundation for a new ultrahigh-resolution microdisplay. The OLED display would feature brighter images with purer colors and more than 10,000 pixels per inch.

Predicting wildfires with CAT scans

Engineers at Stanford have used X-ray CT scans, more common in hospital labs, to study how wood catches fire. They’ve now turned that knowledge into a computer simulation to predict where fires will strike and spread.

Slow-light beam-steering

Researchers have fashioned ultrathin silicon nanoantennas that trap and redirect light, for applications in quantum computing, LIDAR and even the detection of viruses.

To solve climate change, we must deal with heat

Almost all of the world’s energy use involves heat, from making steel to refrigerating food. Deep decarbonization without breakthroughs in thermal science and engineering seems inconceivable. Three leaders in the area highlight five important topics to explore.

A new ultrafast insulin

Stanford researchers tested a new insulin drug in diabetic pigs and found that it was twice as fast-acting as traditional insulin.