Materials

A new ultrafast insulin

Stanford researchers tested a new insulin drug in diabetic pigs and found that it was twice as fast-acting as traditional insulin.

Storing data on 2D metals

Researchers have invented a way to slide atomically-thin layers of 2D materials over one another to store more data, in less space and using less energy.

Artificial synapse works with living cells

Researchers have created a device that can integrate and interact with neuron-like cells. This could be an early step toward an artificial synapse for use in brain-computer interfaces.

Desalination solution

Desalination – the conversion of saltwater to freshwater – has been limited by high operational costs. A new device capable of turning desalination waste into commercially valuable chemicals could make the process cheaper and more environmentally friendly.

Experimental two-in-one shot could aid diabetics

Researchers have developed a way to combine insulin with a second hormone known as amylin, to create a two-in-one injection that could, if proven safe and effective in human trials, make it easier for diabetics to more effectively control their blood sugar levels.

A better way to build diamonds

With the right amount of pressure and surprisingly little heat, a substance found in fossil fuels can transform into pure diamond.

Defects add color to quantum systems

Researchers are investigating light-emitting defects in materials that may someday enable quantum-based technologies, such as quantum computers, quantum networks or engines that run on light. Once understood, these defects can become controllable features.

New catalyst helps turn carbon dioxide into fuel

Stanford engineers Aisulu Aitbekova and Matteo Cargnello say a new process shows promise in turning the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into usable fuels, and yields four times as much fuel as previous approaches.