Materials

New techniques to study deadly ovarian cancer

A particularly deadly form of ovarian cancer is so deadly in part because it is quick to develop resistance to the drugs used to treat it. Now, a team is using new materials and imaging techniques to better understand the disease.

Watching nanoparticle photoreactions

Stanford researchers retooled an electron microscope to work with visible light and gas flow, making it possible to watch a photochemical reaction as it swept across a nanoparticle the size of a cold virus.

A new mechanism for how animal cells stay intact

Watching the movement of every cell in an adult animal all at once, the Prakash lab discovered ultra-fast cellular contractions. This research suggests a new role for cellular contractions in tissue cohesion, which could be the basis of a new material.

Understanding the science of art materials

Science informs art and vice versa in this class that aims to encourage students to look at art – and materials found elsewhere – with fresh eyes.

Liquid-metal, high-voltage flow battery

Stanford scientists have developed a new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal; it more than doubled the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power.