infrastructure

Q&A: New sources of water with desalination research

A new and ambitious research project looks to develop affordable devices to recycle most of the water we now throw away, as well as to desalinate saltwater. The project’s research director describes the project’s vision and operation.

Ensuring coastal resilience for the Bahamas

A new Stanford-led study provides information on how to invest in natural coastal ecosystems that the Bahamian government, community leaders and development banks are applying in post-disaster recovery and future storm preparation in the Bahamas.

Managed retreat buyouts offer lessons for success

New research finds government buyouts of homes in floodplains have often lacked transparency. This could deter residents from participating in managed retreat, one of the main strategies for adapting to areas becoming more flood-prone, Stanford researcher suggests.

Border wall threatens biodiversity

Federal plans to complete a continuous wall along the U.S.-Mexico boundary would threaten the existence of numerous plant and animal species, Stanford researchers say. Paul Ehrlich and Rodolfo Dirzo look at the region’s unique natural ecosystems, and what they have to lose.

Can utilities afford electric vehicle commitments?

Energy policy expert Michael Wara comments on the decision to approve $768 million in transportation electrification projects and how it could affect utilities, the environment and California ratepayers.

What’s next for net neutrality

Because the internet is constantly changing, it is tough to have regulations that will benefit consumers in terms of price and innovation, says Stanford scholar about the challenges of regulating the web.

New plant tests energy-saving way to treat wastewater

A new wastewater treatment plant under construction in Redwood Shores will be the largest to test Stanford-developed technology that significantly reduces the cost of cleaning water. The key: bacteria that eschew oxygen while producing burnable methane.

Stanford scholars discuss infrastructure

Stanford scholars Frank Fukuyama and Raymond Levitt discuss how and where federal dollars should be allocated to enhance the nation’s aging and distressed infrastructure.