discovery

A new mechanism for how animal cells stay intact

Watching the movement of every cell in an adult animal all at once, the Prakash lab discovered ultra-fast cellular contractions. This research suggests a new role for cellular contractions in tissue cohesion, which could be the basis of a new material.

Pond dwellers swim in polygons to avoid light

Although they’ve been studied for hundreds of years, it wasn’t until a Stanford bioengineering lab tried to model how Euglena reacts to light that anyone noticed the organism swimming in precise polygons.

Former ‘Mars czar’ reviews news on the red planet

Discoveries of complex molecules and a liquid water lake, a birthday for one rover and concern for another have brought Mars a lot of attention this summer. Here’s what the first Mars program director, Scott Hubbard, has to say about all the recent excitement.

Rapid screening for bacterial infections

Researchers in medicine, engineering and business are developing a way of diagnosing deadly bacterial blood infections that’s more efficient than current techniques. They aim to speed up treatment while avoiding antibiotic resistance.

Learning through sound

The audible world contains vast amounts of information about the world around us. Scholars from across Stanford are exploring this invisible landscape as a research tool and as a way of understanding each other.

AI recreates chemistry’s periodic table of elements

In a first step toward generating an artificial intelligence program that can find new laws of nature, a Stanford team created a program that reproduced a complex human discovery – the periodic table.

Engineering design course reaches its 50th year

Over the last half-century, students in the ME310 course have produced hundreds of prototypes for cameras, makeup, cars and much more. Combined with international teams, they design and develop new products while learning from reality.

Keeping the good effects of drugs, eliminating the bad

By combining computer simulations with laboratory experiments, an international research team revealed something new about a molecular pathway that enables roughly half of all medications to achieve their desired effects – but is also responsible for many side effects.