Stanford’s 2019 fall quarter guest artists

Guest artists help celebrate several important anniversaries on campus.

This is a year of milestone anniversaries for several arts organizations on the Stanford campus, and guest artists are part of their celebratory programming.

5th – The Anderson Collection at Stanford University turns 5 this year and artist Jim Campbell’s LED-based works are paired with works in the permanent collection that are part of the anniversary reinstallation. Campbell will give a public talk Nov. 6.

10th – Arts Intensive was launched 10 years ago under the banner “three weeks, two units, and a creative community to last a lifetime.” The September program offers a rich arts immersion experience to undergraduates and this year students got to work with guest artists Julie Chang and Amara Tabor-Smith. Chang, a visual artist and Stanford alum, MFA ’07, helped students paint a mural at Willie “Woo Woo” Wong Playground in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Choreographer Tabor-Smith worked with students on the dance theater work REVIVAL: Millennial reMembering in the Afro NOW. The work was inspired by the founding of Stanford’s Committee on Black Performing Arts (CBPA), which marks its 50th anniversary this year. Performances of REVIVAL are in Roble Studio Theater Nov. 14-16.

30th – St. Lawrence String Quartet, Stanford’s ensemble-in-residence, has been bringing people together through music for 30 years. In addition to their engagement with students in the classroom, participation in free online courses and performances in the local community, SLSQ invites guest artists to perform with them on campus. Oboist James Austin Smith is the guest artist with the ensemble on Sept. 29.

50th – In addition to CBPA’s golden anniversary, Stanford Live is also celebrating 50 years of connecting arts, culture and community. Its roster of dozens of fall guest artists includes Australian circus company Gravity & Other Myths in Memorial Auditorium Oct. 11-12, American folk singer-songwriter Bob Dylan at Frost Amphitheater Oct. 14 and drummer, composer, teacher Allison Miller in Bing Studio Nov. 15.

125th – The Cantor Arts Center, 125-years-young, hosts three guest artists in the fall. Mark Dion spent more than a year on campus culling through thousands of objects in the original Stanford Family Collections, and the result is The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death, and Mourning at Stanford, a reinstallation of the Stanford Family Gallery. Dion is giving the Bobbie and Mike Wilsey Distinguished Lecture Oct. 29, titled “The University as Wunderkammer.” Jordan Casteel opens her solo exhibition Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze with a public conversation with Susan Dackerman, the John and Jill Freidenrich Director of the Cantor, Oct. 4. Photographer Mark Klett will participate in a public conversation with Becky Senf, chief curator at the Center for Creative Photography and Norton Family Curator at the Phoenix Museum of Art, about the photography exhibition The Capital Group Foundation Gift — West x Southwest: Edward Weston and Ansel Adams Dec. 5.

The full list of the 2019 fall guest artists follows.

Stanford hosts dozens of guest artists during the fall quarter.

MUSIC

JON BATISTE

Born into a long lineage of Louisiana musicians, Jon Batiste is a globally celebrated musician, educator, bandleader and television personality whose musical skill, artistic vision and exuberant charisma has made him a triple threat and the newly crowned “prince of jazz.” Batiste is strongly committed to philanthropy, education and mentoring of young musicians. He is currently the Artistic Director At Large of the National Jazz Museum in Harlem and Musical Director for The Atlantic.

Concert Nov. 2

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ALESSIO BAX

Acclaimed violinist Joshua Bell returns to Bing Concert Hall with Italian pianist Alessio Bax. Bax is an award-winning pianist who has appeared as a soloist with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra and more.

Concert Nov. 1

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

JOSHUA BELL

Acclaimed violinist Joshua Bell returns to Bing Concert Hall with Italian pianist Alessio Bax. With over 30 years as a soloist under his belt, Bell is the current director of the renowned Academy of St. Martins in the Fields chamber ensemble.

Concert Nov. 1

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

LYNDA BENGLIS

Lynda Benglis was first recognized in the late 1960s for her poured latex and foam works. She created work that was a perfectly timed retort to the male-dominated fusion of painting and sculpture with the advent of Process Art and Minimalism. Known for her exploration of metaphorical and biomorphic shapes, she is concerned with the physicality of form and how it affects the viewer, using a wide range of materials to render dynamic impressions of mass and surface: Soft becomes hard, hard becomes soft, and gestures are frozen. She is participating in the “Artists on the Future” conversation series, where visual artists are paired with cultural thought leaders from various fields to talk about issues vital to our society.

Conversation Oct. 22

Hosted by Office of the Vice President for the Arts

MUSIC

BRUCE BENNETT

CCRMA presents a Modulations concert in loving memory of longtime CCRMA staff member Carr Wilkerson (1966-2019). Wilkerson was responsible for organizing CCRMA’s previous Modulations festivals. His friends, including Bruce Bennett, present live performances and fixed media works of electronic music.

Concert Oct. 5

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

IAN BOSTRIDGE

Jazz pianist, arranger and composer Brad Mehldau presents his new song cycle The Folly of Desire, created with tenor Ian Bostridge.

Concert Oct. 16

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

RUSSELL BRAUN

Composer Hanns Eisler (1898-1962) was born in Austria. As a Jewish Marxist, he was exiled by the Nazis in 1938 and found himself in America, where he became a storied Hollywood film composer. He also wrote lieder with lyrics based on the works of his friend Bertolt Brecht, Goethe and Shakespeare. Eisler’s Hollywood Songbook is performed by baritone Russell Braun and pianist Serouj Kradjian. Eisler was blacklisted in the McCarthy era and deported from the U.S. in 1948. He died in East Germany.

Concert Dec. 6 & 7

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

BROCKHAMPTON

BROCKHAMPTON is not your usual boy band – the 13 member hip-hop group includes singers, rappers, producers, visual artists and songwriters. Formed on the online forum KanyeToThe, BROCKHAMPTON fuses visual aesthetics with a collection of hip-hop and R&B sounds.

Concert Nov. 8

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

JIM CAMPBELL

Contemporary artist Jim Campbell uses technology to filter images of daily life, mediating the audience’s encounter with his subjects and amplifying the flow of time and memory. While many of Campbell’s public projects have been physically sweeping in scale, such as Day for Night (2018) atop the Salesforce Tower in San Francisco, his exhibition at the Anderson Collection focuses on his more intimate works, placing them in dialogue with the permanent collection of the Anderson Collection to create new visual and sensory experiences.

Talk Nov. 6

Hosted by Anderson Collection at Stanford University

MUSIC

CARTOON JAZZ ORCHESTRA

Lenny Carlson has been composer-in-residence for Jeff Sanford’s Cartoon Jazz Septet & Orchestra for 10 years. Sanford is a highly regarded woodwind artist who formed this ensemble to perform the eclectic and challenging music of Raymond Scott, who provided the musical background for 120 Warner Bros. Looney Tunes cartoons of the 1940s and ’50s. The Cartoon Jazz Orchestra’s premiere performance was at the 2003 Stanford Jazz Festival. The musicians in the orchestra are among the top freelance musicians in the Bay Area, with credits from the San Francisco Symphony on down.

Concert Nov. 1

Hosted by Stanford Continuing Studies

MUSIC

LAUCHLAN CASEY

CCRMA presents a Modulations concert in loving memory of longtime CCRMA staff member Carr Wilkerson (1966-2019). Wilkerson was responsible for organizing CCRMA’s previous Modulations festivals. Friends of his, including Lauchlan Casey, present live performances and fixed media works of electronic music.

Concert Oct. 5

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

VISUAL ART

JULIE CHANG

Julie Chang is a San Francisco-based contemporary artist whose work investigates how identities are constructed and how (mis)understandings of both self and other might be resisted, subverted and reimagined. Chang earned her MFA from Stanford University in 2007. She worked with Arts Intensive students on a mural in San Francisco’s Chinatown.

Student workshop September

Hosted by Arts Intensive

VISUAL ART

JORDAN CASTEEL

Artist Jordan Casteel will be in conversation with Susan Dackerman, the John and Jill Freidenrich Director of the Cantor Arts Center, at the opening of her solo exhibition Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze at the Cantor.

Conversation Oct. 4

Hosted by Cantor Arts Center

MUSIC

CHANTICLEER

San Francisco’s own men’s choir, famous worldwide, brings its annual holiday celebration to Memorial Church. Since its 1978 founding in San Francisco by Louis Botto, Chanticleer has toured the world, winning bravos from the capitals of Europe to the greenways of Central Park, where the group has sung alongside the New York Philharmonic.

Concert Dec. 11

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

LUKE DAHL

CCRMA presents a Modulations concert in loving memory of longtime CCRMA staff member Carr Wilkerson (1966-2019). Wilkerson was responsible for organizing CCRMA’s previous Modulations festivals. His friends, including composer and educator Luke Dahl, present live performances and fixed media works of electronic music.

Concert Oct. 5

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

DAYRAMIR GONZÁLEZ TRIO

Dayramir González began his professional career as a pianist and composer with former Irakere member Oscar Valdes’ Afro-Cuban jazz ensemble Diákara at the age of 16. Since winning Havana’s JoJazz festival in 2004 and 2005, he has gone from winning three Cubadisco awards for his 2007 debut album Dayramir & Habana enTRANCé to becoming Berklee College of Music’s first Cuban national Presidential Scholarship recipient to performing in 15,000-seat stadiums with legends like Chucho and Bebo Valdés and headlining Carnegie Hall, representing the young generation of Afro-Cuban jazz.

Concert Dec. 7

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

STEPHANIE DINKINS

Stephanie Dinkins is a transmedia artist who creates platforms for dialogues about artificial intelligence as it intersects race, culture, aging and future histories. She is drawn to work with communities of color with an eye toward creating inclusive and ethical artificial intelligence ecosystems. She earned an MFA from Maryland Institute College of Art and is an alumna of the Whitney Independent Studies Program.

Fall residency

Hosted by Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, Office of the Vice President for the Arts

VISUAL ART

MARK DION

Using over 700 items from the Stanford Family Collections, artist Mark Dion’s fall exhibition explores how Leland Stanford Jr.’s death at age 15 led to the creation of a museum, university, and – by extension – the entire Silicon Valley. Dion spent more than a year culling through the over 6,000 objects in the original Stanford Family Collections to create an exhibition that explores young Leland’s collection – he already was an avid and curious collector at the time of his death – as well as important narratives related to the Stanford family. These include the history of the railroads and the laborers who worked to create them, and the two earthquakes that caused major damage to the museum. The result of Dion’s efforts are two rooms filled with beautiful, startling and quirky objects that are grouped together to highlight the Stanford family’s story and to invite visitors to reflect and make their own connections.

2019 residency

Hosted by Cantor Arts Center

MUSIC

GABRIEL DUNNE

CCRMA presents a Modulations concert in loving memory of longtime CCRMA staff member Carr Wilkerson (1966-2019). Wilkerson was responsible for organizing CCRMA’s previous Modulations festivals. His friends, including Gabriel Dunne, present live performances and fixed media works of electronic music.

Concert Oct. 5

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

BOB DYLAN

Bob Dylan is one of the most influential folk rock icons in American music and pop culture. He began as a folk singer and key figure in the ’60s protest movement, composing songs that chronicled social and civil rights issues of the decade. In the decades that followed, Dylan experimented with electric sets and continued to be a musical and poetic songwriting power. With a career that spans nearly 60 years, Dylan has received numerous awards including a Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize for Literature and a Presidential Medal of Freedom from Barack Obama.

Concert Oct. 14

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ENS EKT

These enigmatic guests at CCRMA are cloaked in mystery, but check the photo for some clues about their performance program.

Concert Oct. 17

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

CREATIVE WRITING

REZA FAROKHFAL

Reza Farokhfal is a published writer in his home country of Iran. His fictional works as well as his works in literary theory and cultural studies have appeared in various literary periodicals and anthologies. His latest book, Of Neda’s Gaze, a collection of essays on Iranian literature and culture, was released this year. Farokhfal will talk about his recently published work, In Presence of the Secret of Motherland. In this monograph, he has offered a reading of the main trends in classic (canonical) and modern Persian literature demonstrating the deep indigenous roots of “Iranianity” – the Iranian national identity.

Lecture Oct. 15

Hosted by Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies, Stanford Festival of Iranian Arts

PERFORMANCE

GRAVITY & OTHER MYTHS

Backbone, the title of this Australian circus’s latest outing, is one of the things it takes to be a performer. Maybe it’s mental, maybe it’s physical, or maybe it’s both. The backbone in this group of 10 is shared as much as singular, making all things possible, and even some things that don’t seem so.

Performances Oct. 11 & 12

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

DAVID GUTTENFELDER

For more than 20 years, National Geographic photojournalist David Guttenfelder has traveled the world, covering international events in more than 100 countries. Repeatedly, he has broken through political barriers to reveal isolated nations to the world, helping to open the first Associated Press news bureau in North Korea in 2011, and last year boarding the first cruise liner to a newly opened Cuba. His talk is titled “A Rare Look – North Korea and Cuba.”

Talk Oct. 30

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

HANGGAI

Hanggai (杭盖), from the steppes of Mongolia by way of Beijing, is a crossover band that blends traditional music and rock. The band is comprised of Mongolian-Chinese musicians, members of one of China’s 55 official ethnic minorities. Though rooted in the northern province of Inner Mongolia, the members of Hanggai, like the country’s Mongolian population, grew up in disparate parts of the country, uniting in the capital, Beijing. The band came together in 2004 when Ilchi and another member of his rock band rediscovered traditional Mongolian music on regular trips home from the capital. A period of intense study and growing excitement resulted in the formation of the band.

Concert Sept. 28

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

JAMES JANO

CCRMA presents a Modulations concert in loving memory of longtime CCRMA staff member Carr Wilkerson (1966-2019). Wilkerson was responsible for organizing CCRMA’s previous Modulations festivals. His friends, including experimental composer, sound artist and producer James Jano, present live performances and fixed media works of electronic music.

Concert Oct. 5

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

JAZZ MAFIA

The Bay Area’s own Jazz Mafia are making a return to the Bing after their sold-out appearance at Stanford Live’s annual Bing Fling. This time around, they’re looking to steal the show in the Bing Studio cabaret, where the merry fun will have you dancing in and out of your seats. On stage will be vocalists Trance Thompson and Moorea Dickason; Tommy Occhiuto on sax; Adam Theis on bass and trombone; Matt Wong on keys; and Darian Gray on drums.

Concerts Dec. 10-14

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ROB KAPILOW

Everyone’s favorite down-to-earth explainer of all types of music returns to Stanford Live for three performances. In the first part of each performance, Kapilow illustrates key points of the music and its creators. Then, the full piece is performed. To top off the experience, Kapilow and the musicians take part in a lively and in-depth Q&A with the audience. This season, dive into Beethoven’s riveting Appassionata piano sonata, issues around censorship and the songs of Cole Porter, and John Adams’ “Shaker Loops” – a study in minimalism.

Performance and Q&A Oct. 10

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

KING’S SINGERS

Soul music, as we think we know it, was born in 1950s America. It was music with passion and with a purpose beyond just entertainment or worship – it represented the unwavering spirit of the civil rights movement, it gave a people a voice. The same has been true of music throughout history and around the world. At the Bing, the renowned King’s Singers will highlight music from the Protestant Reformation in the 1500s to the rise and fall of apartheid in South Africa in the 20th century, from the Singing Revolution in the Baltic States in the 1980s to the lost songs of the Scottish Highlands.

Concert Nov. 10

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

MARK KLETT

Photographer Mark Klett participates in a public conversation about the Cantor Arts Center exhibition West x Southwest.

Conversation Dec. 5

Hosted by Cantor Arts Center

MUSIC

SEROUJ KRADJIAN

Composer Hanns Eisler (1898-1962) was born in Austria. As a Jewish Marxist, he was exiled by the Nazis in 1938 and found himself in America, where he became a storied Hollywood film composer. He also wrote lieder with lyrics based on the works of his friend Bertolt Brecht, Goethe and Shakespeare. Eisler’s Hollywood Songbook, to be performed by baritone Russell Braun and pianist Serouj Kradjian, was hailed as a masterly song cycle of exile. In a twisted turn of events, Eisler was blacklisted in the McCarthy era and deported from the U.S. in 1948. He died in East Germany.

Performances Dec. 6 & 7

Hosted by Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE

LUKIN LINKLATER

Investigating histories of archaeology, anthropology and repatriation on Kodiak Island, Alaska, and the work of black and indigenous thinkers and artists, Lukin Linklater will contextualize her practice in performance alongside and in relation to cultural belongings as gestures toward repatriation. She in on campus to speak about her work We wear one another (2019), a commission for Soundings: An Exhibition in Five Parts in relation to an Inuvialuit rain gut parka that she read as a score for performance with two dancers and an amplified violinist. This work will travel internationally with the exhibition until 2024.

Talk Oct. 16

Hosted by Institute for Diversity in the Arts

CREATIVE WRITING

LAYLI LONG SOLDIER

Layli Long Soldier holds a BFA from the Institute of American Indian Arts and an MFA from Bard College. Her poems have appeared in POETRY magazine, the New York Times, The American Poet, The American Reader, The Kenyon Review Online, BOMB and elsewhere. She is the recipient of an NACF National Artist Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Fellowship and a Whiting Award, and was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Award. Most recently, she received the 2018 PEN/Jean Stein Award and the 2018 National Book Critics Circle Award. She is the author of Chromosomory (Q Avenue Press, 2010) and WHEREAS (Graywolf Press, 2017). She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and is a visiting writer at the Institute of American Indian Arts. Her reading and colloquium are part of the Lane Lecture Series.

Reading Oct 28
Colloquium Oct. 29

Hosted by Creative Writing Program

MUSIC

LUCIBELA

Lucibela began to show an interest in singing at a very early age. When her family moved to Mindelo on the island of São Vicente, it proved to be the perfect place for her to build on her childhood passion. As an adult, she started to sing in the hotels of Santa Maria on the island of Sal and Sal Rei on the island of Boa Vista. She perfected her technique and became an immediate hit with the tourists, performing songs made famous by the great singers of Cabo Verde: Cesária Évora, Titina, Bana. On her first record, Laço umbilical, Lucibela – the voice of gold – explores being a woman and a Cabo-Verdean, living far away and loving with sensuality and grace. The secret of Lucibela’s extraordinary vocal technique lies in her ability to explore the deep register of Brazil’s great sambistas while adding a thrilling vibrato.

Concert Sept. 27

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

NISA KARNSOMPORT

Sound experimentalist Ellen Phan and video artist Nisa Karnsomport present a collaborative audiovisual performance with live manipulation of sounds and images.

Performance Nov. 14

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

MADRIGALCHOR KIEL

Madrigalchor Kiel, directed by Friederike Woebcken, is one of Germany’s finest chamber choirs. Their wide-ranging program of virtuosic choral repertoire includes works by Åhléns, Brahms, Bruckner, Mahler, Mendelssohn, Nörgård, Nystedt and others.

Concert Oct. 10

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

ŽIBUOKLĖ MARTINAITYTĖ

Žibuoklė Martinaitytė is a New York-based Lithuanian composer whose works explore the tensions and longings of identity and place. She performs In Search of Lost Beauty, a sequence of audiovisual novellas for violin, played by Karen Bentley Pollick; cello, played by Monica Scott; piano, played by Marja Mutru; electronics and video.

Concert Oct. 25

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

TREY MCLAUGHLIN & THE SOUNDS OF ZAMAR

Trey McLaughlin & The Sounds of Zamar fill their performance venues with soul-stirring arrangements of contemporary gospel, pop and musical theater numbers. They are known for their rich harmonies and beautiful blends, which are showcased throughout their debut album Limitless, released in November 2012. Limitless is a compilation of original compositions that will bring inspiration and joy to the hearts of those who listen. Always a fresh perspective, the group’s sound is truly authentic while capturing the essence of the original piece.

Concert Oct. 1

Hosted by Office for Religious Life, Stanford Live

MUSIC

BRAD MEHLDAU

The Folly of Desire is a unique program that unites two of jazz and classical’s greatest contemporary players. Jazz piano legend Brad Mehldau performs a newly composed song cycle with opera tenor Ian Bostridge. Mehldau trained at the New School and was influenced by McCoy Tyner’s piano jazz. He has his own trio, created art songs for Renée Fleming, riffed on show tunes and even delved into German lieder. The program also include Schumann’s Dichterliebe.

Concert Oct. 16

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ALLISON MILLER & BOOM TIC BOOM

NYC-based drummer, composer, teacher Allison Miller gathers inspiration from a wide array of genres. Coming from the jazz tradition, she engages her deep roots in improvisation as a vehicle to explore all music. Described by critics as a charismatic and rhythmically propulsive drummer with melodic sensibility, Miller has been named “Rising Star Drummer” and “Top 20 Jazz Drummers” in Downbeat Magazine’s acclaimed Critics Poll. Her band, Boom Tic Boom, is a 2014 recipient of Chamber Music America’s “Presenter Consortium for Jazz Grant” and is proudly sponsored by Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation. Boom Tic Boom is pianist Myra Melford, violinist Jenny Scheinman, clarinetist Ben Goldberg, cornet player Kirk Knuffke, bassist Todd Sickafoose and Miller on drums and composition.

Two concerts Nov. 15

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

CULLEN MILLER

CCRMA presents a Modulations concert in loving memory of longtime CCRMA staff member Carr Wilkerson (1966-2019). Wiklerson was responsible for organizing CCRMA’s previous Modulations festivals. His friends, including systems artist, spatial-media designer and composer Cullen Miller, present live performances and fixed media works of electronic music.

Concert Oct. 5

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

AMANDA MOLE

Hailed as a rising star, Amanda Mole is quickly earning a reputation as one of the leading concert organists of her generation. Her performances have been described as elegant, lucid and having an excellent balance of technical accuracy, rhythm and structure. Mole earned first prize at the 8th International Musashino-Tokyo Organ Competition (2017), one of the largest and most prestigious organ competitions in the world. She performs Louis Vierne’s Symphony No. 2 in Memorial Church.

Concert Nov. 6

Hosted by Office for Religious Life

MUSIC

MUMFORD & SONS

Mumford & Sons, the 2019 recipient of the John Steinbeck Award, got their start in the west London folk scene and quickly became one of the most popular groups to come out of it. The award ceremony at Bing Concert Hall featured a conversation with the band followed by a performance. The band is also the recipient of a Grammy, a Brit Award and a Mercury Prize, among others. The John Steinbeck Award is given annually to writers, thinkers, artists and activists who embody the spirit and legacy of John Steinbeck.

Concert and award ceremony Sept. 18

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MUSICA NUDA

This Italian duo’s mission is as simple as it is bold: to make music with the bare necessities – a stunning voice and a double bass – free to trace any music back to its core. They have no boundaries, fusing bits of jazz, songwriting, rock, punk and classical music, using the art of silence as well as sound, underlining the value of a lyric, a story, the meaning of every song, whether dramatic, funny, energetic, sarcastic or romantic. They have just released their 11th album, Leggera, an accomplished and mature expression of their artistry and evidence of their continued openness to collaboration.

Concert Nov. 17

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MARJA MUTRU

Žibuoklė Martinaitytė is a New York-based Lithuanian composer whose works explore the tensions and longings of identity and place. She performs In Search of Lost Beauty, a sequence of audiovisual novellas for violin, played by Karen Bentley Pollick; cello, played by Monica Scott; piano, played by Marja Mutra; electronics and video.

Concert Oct. 25

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

MICHAEL MWENSO & THE SHAKES

Harlem 100 is hosted by Michael Mwenso, whose band Michael Mwenso and the Shakes draws its inspirations from around the globe. The multimedia variety show created in collaboration with Harlem’s National Jazz Museum captures the Harlem Renaissance’s spirit, sights and sounds. It highlights the words and music of Billie Holiday, Langston Hughes, Fats Waller, Duke Ellington, Bessie Smith and Ethel Waters, and pays tribute to the Apollo Theater, the Cotton Club and other venues of that brilliant era.

Concert Nov. 20

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

NELLA

Nella, who has already garnered the support of Latin pop star Alejandro Sanz, has performed with a variety of artists such as Jennifer Lopez, Carlos Vives, Luis Enrique and Susana Baca. More recently, Nella was asked to join the stellar cast of Oscar Award winner Asghar Farhadi’s new movie, Everybody Knows, featuring Javier Bardem, Ricardo Darín and Penélope Cruz, where she sings songs written by composer and producer Javier Limón exclusively for the screenplay.

Concert Nov. 14

Hosted by Stanford Live

 

MUSIC

WILLIE NELSON

With a six-decade career and 200-plus albums, Willie Nelson has earned every conceivable award as a musician and amassed reputable credentials as an author, actor and activist. He continues to thrive as a relevant and progressive musical and cultural force. In recent years, he has delivered more than a dozen new album releases; released a Top 10 New York Times best-selling book; again headlined Farm Aid, an event he co-founded in 1985; received his 5th degree black belt in Gong Kwon Yu Sul; headlined the annual Luck Reunion food and music festival at his ranch in Luck, Texas, during SXSW; and graced the covers of Rolling Stone and AARP The Magazine. He performs in Frost Amphitheater with Lukas Nelson and Promise of The Real.

Concert Oct. 12

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

PETER NYBOER

CCRMA presents a Modulations concert in loving memory of longtime CCRMA staff member Carr Wilkerson (1966-2019). Wilkerson was responsible for organizing CCRMA’s previous Modulations festivals. His friends, including programmer, video artist and musician Peter Nyboer, present live performances and fixed media works of electronic music.

Concert Oct. 5

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

LIESL ODENWELLER

Liesl Odenweller, soprano, presents a masterclass for Stanford voice students. The class is open to the public. She also collaborates with the Venice Music Project ensemble for a program of works by 17th- and 18th-century Venetian composers as part of the Shenson Recital Series.

Masterclass Nov. 18
Concert Nov. 19

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

ALICIA OLATUJA

Praised by the New York Times as “a singer with a strong and luscious tone and an amiably regal presence on stage,” Alicia Olatuja has been astounding audiences with her exquisite vocals, artistic versatility and captivating demeanor. She first came into the national spotlight in 2013, while performing as the featured soloist with the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir at President Barack Obama’s Second Inauguration. Shortly thereafter, she assembled her own jazz based ensemble and recorded her first solo album, Timeless (2014).

Two concerts Nov. 16

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

PENINSULA SYMPHONY

Peninsula Symphony’s annual collaboration with the Stanford Symphonic Chorus and Stephen Sano, director, marks its 27th year by celebrating music with a significant Jewish focus. Join us as we feature Peninsula Symphony’s own concertmaster and Stanford Department of Music faculty members Debra Fong, violin, and Christopher Costanza, cellist for the St. Lawrence String Quartet.

Concert Nov. 22

Hosted by Department of Music

PERFORMANCE

ELLEN PHAN

Sound experimentalist Ellen Phan and video artist Nisa Karnsomport present a collaborative audiovisual performance with live manipulation of sounds and images.

Performance Nov. 14

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA

Founding director of acclaimed period-instrument ensemble Apollo’s Fire makes her long-awaited debut as guest conductor with an electrifying program of Mozart and more. Spanning his life from childhood to prime, Jeannette Sorrell and Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra present this enchanting Mozartian voyage, featuring PBO’s own Gonzalo X. Ruiz and a beautiful suite from Mozart’s then-popular contemporary André Grétry – Sorrell calls him “Mozart, with a French accent.”

Concert Nov. 13

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

KAREN BENTLEY POLLICK

Žibuoklė Martinaitytė is a New York-based Lithuanian composer whose works explore the tensions and longings of identity and place. She performs In Search of Lost Beauty, a sequence of audiovisual novellas for violin, played by Karen Bentley Pollick; cello, played by Monica Scott; piano, played by Marja Mutra; electronics and video.

Concert Oct. 25

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

MAX RICHTER & THE AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY MUSIC ENSEMBLE

Max Richter’s contemporary compositions have been described as exquisite, ravishing and bewitching exemplars of neoclassicism. His music has brought down concert halls around the world and has been embraced by the film community; his remake of Vivaldi’s Spring is the ear-catching intro to the Netflix hit show Chef’s Table. In Richter’s visit to the Bing with the American Contemporary Music Ensemble, they will present From Sleep and Infra, inspired by T.S. Eliot’s “The Wasteland.”

Concert Oct. 13

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

TERRY RILEY AND GYAN RILEY

California composer Terry Riley launched what is now known as the Minimalist movement with his revolutionary classic IN C in 1964. This seminal work provided a new concept in musical form based on interlocking repetitive patterns. Its impact changed the course of 20th-century music and its influence has been heard in the works of prominent composers such as Steve Reich, Philip Glass and John Adams and in the music of rock groups such as The Who, The Soft Machine, Tangerine Dream, Curved Air and many others. Terry Riley is joined by his son, award-winning classical guitarist Gyan Riley.

Two concerts Oct. 19

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

ANDREW RIDKER

Andrew Ridker is the author of The Altruists, a New York Times editors’ choice, published in 18 countries. He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and is the editor of Privacy Policy: The Anthology of Surveillance Poetics. His writing has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Paris Review Daily, Boston Review, The Believer and elsewhere. He discusses healthy and unhealthy altruism, and the intersection of privilege and progress, as explored in The Altruists, and will discuss with Audrey Shafer the role of literature in society and how the creative process transfigures fact into fiction.

Talk Nov. 2

Hosted by Contemplation by Design, Department of Medicine Stanford Prevention Research Center, LifeWorks, Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, Stanford Medicine & the Muse Program, Stanford Storytelling Project

MUSIC

PLUKO

From bedroom producer to the mainstage; that is the motto of pluko. Sam Martinsen hails from the small town of Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania, yet there is absolutely nothing “small” about his sound. His bass-filled tracks and intricate weaving of each and every record provides a sound you would hear from veterans in the industry, not typically from a 16-year-old. While sitting in his makeshift bedroom/studio, Martinsen noticed that he could bring about a whole new and exciting vibe to the ever-growing EDM scene. Influenced by the likes of Flume, Skrillex and The Chainsmokers, it is without a doubt that pluko is the next name up in the industry. PICO, a singer, songwriter and producer from Monterrey, Mexico, who is studying at Stanford, opens.

Concert Oct. 18

Hosted by Stanford Concert Network, Stanford Live

 

MUSIC

ROOMFUL OF TEETH

Marking 30 years since the death of groundbreaking photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, composer Bryce Dessner (The National) created Triptych (Eyes of One on Another), a powerful work that explores the origins and impact of Mapplethorpe’s controversial photography. Created with librettist korde arrington tuttle and director Kaneza Schaal in collaboration with the vocal group Roomful of Teeth and the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, Triptych includes music, projections of Mapplethorpe’s images and the poetry of Patti Smith and Essex Hemphill.

Concert Oct. 3

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER ORCHESTRA ALL-STARS

Two famous piano quartets – one composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1785; the other completed by Gabriel Fauré in 1883 – form the basis of a musical exploration of Classical and Romantic styles. Mozart’s Piano Quartet in G minor, K. 478, is a dark and dramatic work by our most famous Classical composer. In contrast, Fauré’s Piano Quartet in C minor, Op. 15, is a sweeping lyrical work by the great French Romantic. Stanford Continuing Studies presents a brief guided musical tour of both works, followed by complete performances featuring the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra All-Stars.

Lecture and performance Oct. 12

Hosted by Stanford Continuing Studies

MUSIC

SAN FRANCISCO CONTEMPORARY MUSIC PLAYERS

Marking 30 years since the death of groundbreaking photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, composer Bryce Dessner (The National) created Triptych (Eyes of One on Another), a powerful work that explores the origins and impact of Mapplethorpe’s controversial photography. Created with librettist korde arrington tuttle and director Kaneza Schaal in collaboration with the vocal group Roomful of Teeth and the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, Triptych includes music, projections of Mapplethorpe’s images and the poetry of Patti Smith and Essex Hemphill.

Concert Oct. 3

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MONICA SCOTT

Žibuoklė Martinaitytė is a New York-based Lithuanian composer whose works explore the tensions and longings of identity and place. She performs In Search of Lost Beauty, a sequence of audiovisual novellas for violin, played by Karen Bentley Pollick; cello, played by Monica Scott; piano, played by Marja Mutra; electronics and video.

Concert Oct. 25

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

JAMES AUSTIN SMITH

Oboist James Austin Smith performs new and old music across the United States and around the world. He is an artist of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), the Talea Ensemble and the Poulenc Trio, as well as co-artistic director of Tertulia, a chamber music series that takes place in restaurants in New York and San Francisco. He performs with the St. Lawrence String Quartet, Stanford’s ensemble-in-residence.

Concert Sept. 29

Hosted by Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE

NASSIM SOLEIMANPOUR

From Iranian playwright Nassim Soleimanpour comes an audacious new theatrical experience. Each night a different performer joins the playwright on stage, while the script waits unseen in a sealed box. But will they understand each other? Touchingly autobiographical yet powerfully universal, NASSIM is a striking theatrical demonstration of how language can both divide and unite us.

Performances Nov. 7-10

Hosted by Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies, Stanford Live

MUSIC

JEANNETTE SORRELL

Founding director of acclaimed period-instrument ensemble Apollo’s Fire makes her long-awaited debut as guest conductor with an electrifying program of Mozart and more. Spanning his life from childhood to prime, Jeannette Sorrell and Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra present this enchanting Mozartian voyage, featuring PBO’s own Gonzalo X. Ruiz and a beautiful suite from Mozart’s then-popular contemporary André Grétry – Sorrell calls him “Mozart, with a French accent.”

Concert Nov. 13

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

COLLIN SULLIVAN

CCRMA presents a Modulations concert in loving memory of longtime CCRMA staff member Carr Wilkerson (1966-2019). Wilkerson was responsible for organizing CCRMA’s previous Modulations festivals. His friends, including Collin Sullivan, present live performances and fixed media works of electronic music.

Concert Oct. 5

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

VISUAL ART

GEORGE STEINMETZ

George Steinmetz is a self-taught photographer who began his career while hitchhiking through Africa for 28 months with a French dictionary. Steinmetz has received numerous awards for photography, including three prizes from World Press Photo and the Environmental Vision Award from Pictures of the Year for his work on large-scale agriculture for the New York Times Magazine. He has published four books of his photography: African Air, Empty Quarter, Desert Air and New York Air. He earned a BS in geophysics from Stanford.

Talk Oct. 23

Hosted by Stanford Continuing Studies

PERFORMANCE

AMARA TABOR-SMITH

Amara Tabor-Smith leads the creation of a site-specific, multimedia, dance theater work titled REVIVAL: Millennial reMembering in the Afro NOW. It is an Afro-futurist, devised dance theater work, inspired by the founding of the Committee on Black Performing Arts (CBPA), which marks its 50th anniversary this year. Utilizing the stories and characteristics of the Yoruba deities known as Orisha, REVIVAL is a multi-media and multi-site experience exploring the people and events that have catalyzed movements for social change through time. A non-linear narrative, REVIVAL is driven by the core question: What parts of our myths and stories do we choose to recall, remember and re-invent in order to carry us forward repaired, restored and revived?

Performances Nov. 14-16

Hosted by Arts Intensive, BLACKstage, Department of Theater and Performance Studies, Institute for Diversity in the Arts

MUSIC

THE ORCHESTRA NOW

Men of Iron and the Golden Spike 交响清唱剧 is a West Coast premiere symphonic oratorio telling the epic story of the thousands of Chinese workers who helped to complete the Transcontinental Railroad in the American West. It is performed by Bard College’s professional orchestra, The Orchestra Now, conducted by Jindong Cai, and the Silicon Valley Chorale and soloists.

Concert Oct. 6

Hosted by Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE

JESUS TREJO

Jesus Trejo is an LA-based comedian, actor and writer. Born and raised in Long Beach, California, Trejo was named one of Variety’s Top 10 Comics to Watch in 2017. He is a paid regular at the Comedy Store in Los Angeles. Trejo often appears on Comedy Central’s Roast Battle, and can be seen on Alone Together (Freeform), Teachers (TV Land), Adam Devine’s House Party (Comedy Central), Uproarious (Fuse) and on the upcoming Netflix series Mr. Iglesias. He was selected to be a New Face comedian in 2016 for the prestigious Just For Laughs Festival in Montreal.

Two performances Sept. 28

Hosted by Stanford Live

 

MUSIC

CHUCHO VALDÉS

One of the most important exponents of Afro-Cuban jazz, Chucho Valdés is spending his 70s touring the world. His father, famed pianist and bandleader Bebo Valdés, left Cuba in 1960. Father and son had little contact until shortly before Bebo’s death at age 94 in Stockholm. Valdés’ album, Jazz Batá 2, features piano and batá, an hourglass-shaped Yoruban drum, and a song called “100 years of Bebo” – a salute to Chucho’s father’s centenary this year.

Concert Oct. 18

Hosted by Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE

YANG ZHEN

Minorities (少數民族) – a work by “boy wonder” choreographer Yang Zhen (楊朕) – includes a cast of actors, dancers and a singer who hail from Tibet, Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia and Europe. It is the final installment of Zhen’s trilogy of works that examine societal roles and class divisions in China. A co-production of the Taipei Arts Festival and Dance Munich, Minorities explores how minority identities in China fit (or don’t fit) in the narrative of a harmonious One China.

Performances Nov. 1-3

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

VENICE MUSIC PROJECT

Liesl Odenweller, soprano, collaborates with the Venice Music Project ensemble for a program of works by 17th- and 18th-century Venetian composers as part of the Shenson Recital Series.

Concert Nov. 19

Hosted by Department of Music

PERFORMANCE

TIMOTHY WEAVER

Timothy Weaver’s “afterlife” cinema seeks to reanimate the residues, records and archives of lost ecological memory. Weaver is a new media artist, life scientist and bioenvironmental engineer whose concerted objective is to contribute to the restoration of ecological memory through a process of speculative inquiry along the art/science interface.

Performance Oct. 31

Hosted by Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, Department of Music

MUSIC

JAMES WELCH

James Welch, organist at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, Palo Alto, and Santa Clara University, performs Louis Vierne’s Symphony No. 1. The six remarkable organ symphonies of Louis Vierne (1870-1937) tower over the organ music of the late Romantic era. He was, for 37 years, the organist of Notre Dame de Paris, and it is with that building that his music is so closely identified. In celebration of the 150th anniversary of his birth, the symphonies will be performed on the Murray Harris organ in historic Stanford Memorial Church.

Concert Oct. 9

Hosted by Department of Music, Office for Religious Life

MUSIC

GREGORY YASINITSKY

Michael Galisatus directs the Stanford Jazz Orchestra’s program featuring special guest saxophonist Gregory Yasinitsky.

Concert Nov. 13

Hosted by Associated Students of Stanford University, Department of Music

PERFORMANCE

ZDoggMD

Best known by his viral alter ego, ZDoggMD, Dr. Zubin Damania uses a mix of music, humor and creative storytelling to deliver a high-energy and entertaining presentation about today’s dysfunctional healthcare system and collaborative ways to revitalize it. Damania examines how we can all work to build Health 3.0, an ideal model of care where technology and evidence-based medicine seamlessly support healthcare teams in achieving the outcomes that actually matter to our patients, while improving the well-being of the caregivers themselves.

Performance Oct. 1

Hosted by Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics