MediaX grants support Stanford researchers as they study how content is created, consumed and curated

Ten research projects will engage more than 31 faculty members, postdoctoral scholars and students who will investigate a variety of topics, including the future of cross-platform publishing; the economics of the market for mobile apps; learning content for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in K-12 environments; content of web pages for use in multiple devices; and the future of the textbook in touch-based devices.

MediaX, an industry affiliate program at Stanford University, has awarded 10 research grants to Stanford scholars to study the future of content creation and publishing.

The 10 research projects will engage more than 31 faculty members, postdoctoral scholars and students and will focus on a variety of topics, including the future of cross-platform publishing; the economics of the market for mobile apps; learning content for science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in K-12 environments; content of web pages for use in multiple devices; and the future of the textbook in touch-based devices.

The 10 projects were selected through two campus-wide calls for proposals, which offered up to $80,000 for innovative research. The winning proposals were chosen based on their interdisciplinary approach and for their potential impact on the future of content and publishing. Grants for the projects ranged from $25,000 to $60,000.

Award recipients work in a broad range of disciplines including physics, medicine, journalism, communications, computer science, and management science and engineering. They include faculty, postdoctoral scholars and students. Some of the proposals were generated by students and their work on the projects will be part of their academic programs.

"When we work with MediaX, we can get more innovative ideas from professors and researchers," said Hiroshi Tomita, president at Konica Minolta Laboratory USA Inc., the MediaX member company that provided the gift to support the research projects.

Following is a list of the principal investigators and the titles of their projects:

  • Brigid Barron, associate professor of education: "Contests as a Catalyst for Content Creation: Contrasting Cases to Advance Theory and Practice" (experimental study on fostering the creation of content by students).
  • Paulo Blikstein, assistant professor of education: "A New Generation of Hybrid Tangible Interfaces for STEM Learning in K-12 Environments" (understanding requirements, developing, and testing an experimentation platform for science and engineering education, with learning analytics).
  • Jeff Heer, assistant professor of computer science, with Ann Grimes, the Lorry I. Lokey Professor of the Practice and director of the Graduate Program in Journalism: "Transparent Social Footprints: A New Road to Digital Dollars?" (exploring consumers' behavior with online news content and advertising).
  • Ramesh Johari, associate professor of management science and engineering: "Content On the Go: The Economics of the Market for Mobile Apps" (investigating a data-driven analysis to describe the economics of the mobile app ecosystem regarding content creation strategies).
  • Scott Klemmer, associate professor of computer science: "TweakCorps: Retargeting Existing Webpages for Diverse Devices and Users" (investigating machine-learning analysis of cross-platform design elements).
  • Robert Laughlin, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of Physics, with Neil Jacobstein, MediaX Distinguished Visiting Scholar: "Long-Term Integrity of Publish on Demand for Decision Products" (studying infrastructure requirements and criteria for systematic construction and long-term integrity of high-level decision products).
  • Clifford Nass, the Thomas M. Storke Professor of Communication: "Physical Media as Active Social Learning Agents" (exploring how social interaction with mechatronic media affects a creative K-12 learning experience).
  • Roy Pea, the David Jacks Professor of Education and Learning Sciences and Sam Wineburg, the Margaret Jacks Professor of Education: "Recasting the Textbook as an On-Demand, Collaborative Collection of Historical Narratives Through Primary Documents and Interactive, Touch-Based Devices" (exploring the integration of primary source documents in a mixed-methods research effort for digital history).
  • Sakti Srivastava, associate professor of surgery and anatomy: "The Stanford Clinical Anatomy Scans (SCAnS) Library" (investigating requirements and testing an online library of educational CT scans for use by high school students).
  • John Willinsky, the Khosla Family Professor, School of Education: "Scholarly Texts for Cross-Platform Publishing, Text-Mining and Indexing" (investigating automated parsing, tagging and conversion of content into XML).

"These projects will explore concepts and tools for insights applicable to commerce, entertainment and education," said Martha Russell, executive director of MediaX.

MediaX is the industry affiliate program of Stanford's H-STAR Institute, an interdisciplinary research center focusing on people and technology. Members explore how the thoughtful use of technology can impact fields ranging from entertainment and learning to commerce. MediaX promotes research into innovative ways for people to collaborate, communicate and interact with the information, products and industries of tomorrow.