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Smart faucet could help save water

An experiment with a water-saving “smart” faucet shows potential for reducing water use. The catch? Unbeknownst to study participants, the faucet’s smarts came from its human controller.

Food security from oceans

Our growing need for food poses one of the biggest threats to the environment. Examining contributions from the ocean more closely can be key to addressing the challenge.

What it’s like to be a chemist

Chemists Michael Fayer, Hemamala Karunadasa, Noah Burns and Laura Dassama talk about their paths into the field, the joys of making new molecules and the way in which the “central science” pervades our lives.

Potential treatments for citrus greening

Finding a treatment for a devastating, incurable citrus disease was personal for Sharon Long and Melanie Barnett. Now, a system they developed could provide clues to a cure.

Understanding ourselves and our past

Stanford humanities scholars are probing ancient questions through modern and traditional methods to figure out how and why history unfolded the way it did and what makes us human.

Atomically thin heat shield protects electronics

Atomically thin materials developed by Stanford researchers could create heat shields for cell phones or laptops that would protect people and temperature-sensitive components and make future electronic gadgets even more compact.

Wireless sensors stick to skin and track health

Stanford engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing. It’s all part of a system called BodyNet.

Back to school

With a new school year ahead, Stanford research shows how students, teachers and parents can better understand what leads to – or in some instances, undermines – a student's success.