Office, academic and housing projects get green light from trustees

The Board of Trustees recently gave construction approval—the final step in the process—to the Law School Academic Building and the Olmsted Terrace Faculty Homes projects, two of four building proposals trustees acted on during their June 10-11 meeting.

The board also gave design approval for an office building for the Linac Coherent Light Source, located on the campus of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and project approval for the fit-up of the Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center.

Law School Academic Building

The Law School Academic Building will provide academic space for faculty, fellows and researchers; a home for the Mills Legal Clinic; and offices for the school's entire faculty.

The total cost of the project has dropped in recent months to $64 million from $70.6 million, due to financing cost savings, competitive market conditions and value engineering.

The project received concept and site approval in 2007, design approval in 2008 and project approval in February 2009.

To make way for the new building, Kresge Auditorium will be razed. The demolition is expected to begin this summer. An auditorium planned as part of the new Knight Management Center campus of the Graduate School of Business will replace both Kresge and the Business School's Bishop Auditorium.

The new three-story building is expected to be completed in December 2010.

Olmsted Terrace Faculty Homes

The Olmsted Terrace Faculty Homes is the new name of the project to build 39 single-family detached homes on the eastern edge of campus on Stanford Avenue, near the College Terrace neighborhood of Palo Alto.

The budget for the project, formerly known as Stanford Avenue Faculty Homes, has dropped in recent months to $28.6 million from $30.9 million, due to a variety of factors, including reduction in direct costs based on bids.

The project received concept and site approval in 2007, design approval in 2008 and project approval in February 2009.

Currently, Stanford is installing a storm drain under Olmsted Road along the southeast edge of Escondido Village adjacent to Stanford Avenue to prepare for the construction of the faculty homes, as well as the nearby Olmsted Road Staff Rental Housing project. Once the storm drain project is complete, construction of the wet and dry utilities serving the homes will begin immediately, followed by onsite grading.

The two-story faculty homes, which will range in size from 1,900 to 2,400 square feet, will each have three or four bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms and a private study. Construction will occur in two phases on a rolling production schedule. A model home is expected to be open to the public in April 2010. The first four homes are expected to be completed that summer. All of the homes are expected to be completed by February 2011.

Linac Coherent Light Source Office Building

Trustees gave design approval for a new office building for the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

The total cost of the project is $12.5 million; construction is expected to begin in July.

The Linac Coherent Light Source is a mile-long machine that produces a laser beam made of X-rays. Its laser bursts are so bright and so brief that researchers will use them as an ultrafast stop-motion camera to capture the minute details of things previously unseen, such as the arrangement of atoms in metals, semiconductors, ceramics, polymers and proteins.

The new two-story office building will serve an international scientific community, including Stanford students and faculty, users from industry, national laboratories, universities and international institutions. It will be located off Pep Ring Road, east of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory central campus.

Instruments are now being installed in the $420 million Linac Coherent Light Source, which is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by Stanford; experiments are expected to begin in the fall.

Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center

Trustees gave project approval for the fit-up of the Jen-Hsun Huang Engineering Center, which is currently under construction in the Science and Engineering Quadrangle.

Previous estimates for the three-story engineering center did not include fit-up costs.

The fit-up for the $84 million Huang Engineering Center project includes construction enhancements to the building interior, and equipment and laboratory build-outs that are outside of the scope of the base building project.

The $14 million fit-up, which received concept approval last April, includes installation of a specialized audiovisual system for the center's auditorium, conference rooms and classrooms of the Stanford Center for Professional Development. The center also will have a café, a catering kitchen for the boardroom, a wood and metal shop, and a shared server room.

The fit-up project is expected to return to trustees for construction approval in October.