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The climate of health

The damage we do to the world around us is eventually visited upon us in the form of hunger, mental health, thirst, disease and other health issues. Here we explore a few of those health consequences.

Stanford’s Robot Makers: Mark Cutkosky

Mark Cutkosky is the Fletcher Jones Chair in the School of Engineering and a professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University. His lab focuses on biomimetic engineering – robots and technologies that take inspiration from nature – and improving robots’ abilities to interact with the physical world. This Q&A is one of five featuring Stanford faculty who work on robots as part of the project Stanford’s Robotics Legacy.

Stanford’s Robot Makers: Andrew Ng

Andrew Ng is an adjunct professor of computer science at Stanford University. In his first decade at Stanford, he worked on autonomous helicopters and the STAIR project. He is now focusing on applications for artificial intelligence in many areas, including health care, education and manufacturing. This Q&A is one of five featuring Stanford faculty who work on robots as part of the project Stanford’s Robotics Legacy.

Stanford’s Robot Makers: Oussama Khatib

Oussama Khatib is a professor of computer science at Stanford University and leads the Robotics Lab. His projects have included cooperative robots, Romeo and Juliet, and the diving robot, OceanOne. He is also interested in autonomous robots, human-friendly robotics, haptics – bringing the sense of touch to robotics – and virtual and augmented reality research. This Q&A is one of five featuring Stanford faculty who work on robots as part of the project Stanford’s Robotics Legacy.

Students explore the complexities of creating energy

Students who joined the Sophomore College course Water and Power in the Pacific Northwest: The Columbia River traveled to the Columbia River valley to understand the interplay between water, energy and human populations.

Swirling liquids shed light on how bitcoin works

The physics involved with stirring a liquid operate the same way as the mathematical functions that secure digital information. This parallel could help in developing even more secure ways of protecting digital information.