Stanford’s spring quarter guest artists

Guest artists are all over campus this spring. Indie rock band Glass Animals play Stanford Stadium; the open-air literary celebration Stories of Exile, Reckoning and Hope takes place on the main stage in White Plaza; Mina Morita directs Bertolt Brecht’s The Good Person of Szechwan in Roble Studio Theater; and Stanford Live’s popular Cabaret series continues in Bing’s cozy underground studio with music from the world of James Bond, an evening of traditional and revolutionary Chilean songs, and an appearance by Uriel Herman – a 29-year-old classically trained jazz pianist who’s making the rounds on his debut tour of the United States.

Eclectic offerings include a concert of exotic and lesser-known piping traditions (a.k.a. “the other bagpipes”), a night of Manila disco, and a conversation with the Sultan of Sleaze, the Prince of Puke and the King of Schlock: John Waters.

PERFORMANCE ART

RON ATHEY

Ron Athey is an iconic figure in the development of contemporary art and performance. In his often bloody portrayals of life, death, crisis and fortitude in the time of AIDS, Athey calls into question the limits of artistic practice. These limits enable him to explore key themes, including gender, sexuality, SM and radical sex, queer activism, post-punk and industrial culture, tattooing and body modification, ritual and religion.

Performances May 3 & 4

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History, Department of Theater & Performance Studies, Stanford Arts, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education

CREATIVE WRITING

AIMEE BENDER

Aimee Bender is the author of short fiction and five books: The Girl in the Flammable Skirt (1998), a New York Times Notable Book; An Invisible Sign of My Own (2000), a Los Angeles Times pick of the year; Willful Creatures (2005), nominated by The Believer as one of the best books of the year; The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake (2010), winner of the SCIBA award for best fiction and an Alex Award; and The Color Master (2013), a New York Times Notable Book. After her presentation, Bender will be in conversation with Jones Lecturers and former Stegner Fellows in fiction Kate Peterson and Mark Labowskie. This event is part of the Frankenstein@200 initiative at the Center for Biomedical Ethics.

Conversation April 30

Hosted by Creative Writing Program, Stanford Humanities Center, McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society

MUSIC

BOB BERKMAN

The sixth “Reactions to the Record” symposium focuses on the Player Piano Project. The symposium includes presentations, panels, concerts and demonstrations highlighting the latest work being conducted on historical performance documents, especially player pianos and piano rolls. Guest artists include Bob Berkman on pianola and cellist/composer Jonathan Golove. Berkman has been associated with player pianos most of his life. In 1975, he was hired by QRS in Buffalo, New York, the world’s last piano roll manufacturer, where he produced innumerable reissues of historic roll recordings and maintained a constant flow of new recordings for over 30 years.

Symposium April 6-8

Hosted by Department of Music, Stanford Arts Institute

MUSIC

THEO BLECKMANN

In a program first presented under the auspices of Jazz at Lincoln Center, the 1960s are explored through the work of three prolific artists: Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln and Nina Simone. Mitchell composed and sang about the freedom of love, Lincoln expressed freedom of her individuality and race through her lyricism, and Simone demanded freedom politically through song. To deliver this vast repertoire, drummer and music director Ulysses Owens Jr. leads three vocalists: Theo Bleckmann, a Grammy-nominated jazz singer of eclectic tastes and prodigious gifts; Alicia Olatuja, “a singer with a strong and luscious tone” (New York Times); and Joanna Majoko, a naturally gifted and multicultural artist born to German and Zimbabwean parents.

Concert April 19

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

JAAP BLONK

Jaap Blonk presents Songs of Little Sleep and other recent works for voice and electronics. As a vocalist, he is known for his powerful stage presence and almost childlike freedom in improvisation, combined with a keen grasp of structure. With the use of live electronics, the scope and range of his concerts have acquired a considerable extension.

Concert April 5

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

MUSIC

BOSTON POPS

Under the baton of conductor Keith Lockhart, the world-renowned Boston Pops orchestra brings the music of celebrated American film composer John Williams, the man behind the soundtracks for E.T., Star Wars, Harry Potter and more, to the Bing for an evening featuring excerpts from the composer’s best-loved scores, as well as some lesser-known gems. No one plays the music of America’s favorite composer like America’s favorite orchestra.

Concert April 20

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

CAROLINE CAMPBELL

Virtuoso violinist and alum Caroline Campbell, ’04, presents an intimate recital devoted to the lush melodies and fiery passion of popular classical, opera and film music, including original arrangements from West Side Story, Scent of a Woman, Magic Flute, The Godfather, Cinema Paradiso, Carmen and Titanic.

Concert April 8

Hosted by Department of Music

CREATIVE WRITING

RON CARLSON

Stein Visiting Writer Ron Carlson’s most recent novel is Return to Oakpine. His short stories have appeared in Esquire, Harper’s, The New Yorker and The Atlantic Monthly, as well as in The Best American Short Stories, The O’Henry Prize Series, The Pushcart Prize Anthology and The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. He teaches fiction at the University of California, Irvine, and his book on writing, Ron Carlson Writes a Story, is taught widely.

Reading April 18

Hosted by Creative Writing Program

MUSIC

KEVIN CARR

Kevin Carr has performed music of traditional cultures for more than 40 years. He currently performs as a member of Wake the Dead, a Celtic/Grateful Dead jam band; with Hillbillies from Mars, an eclectic dance band; with Ospa, playing Basque traditional music; and with his family band. He also performs as a storyteller and has released several recordings of his storytelling. For the program “The Other Bagpipes: Exotic and Lesser-Known Piping Traditions of the World,” Carr and percussionist Brian Rice introduce listeners to the bagpipes of many cultures, along with a bit of the folklore associated with this powerful, beguiling, almost shamanic instrument.

Concert May 3

Hosted by Continuing Studies

FILM, MUSIC

BENOÎT CHAREST

The much beloved animated film The Triplets of Belleville is screened as composer Benoît Charest leads Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville in a live performance of his original score for the film, including his Academy Award-nominated song “Belleville Rendez-vous.” Be transported to the streets of 1920s Paris and Le Jazz Hot when Madame Souza’s grandson is kidnapped during the Tour de France, and she and her beloved pooch Bruno team up with the Belleville Sisters, an aging song and dance group, to rescue him.

Screening and concert April 14 & 15

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

JUDY CHICAGO

Judy Chicago is an artist, author, feminist, educator and intellectual whose career now spans five decades. Chicago has remained steadfast in her commitment to the power of art as a vehicle for intellectual transformation and social change and to women’s right to engage in the highest level of art production. She is in conversation with Marci Kwon, assistant professor of art history, for the annual Burt and Deedee McMurtry Lecture.

Lecture April 23

Hosted by Anderson Collection, Stanford Live

MUSIC

CHOIR OF THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE, OXFORD

The Choir of The Queen’s College, Oxford, is widely recognized as one of the leading collegiate choirs in the U.K. In addition to singing weekly services in the College’s Baroque chapel, the 30 singers maintain a busy schedule of concerts, broadcasts, recordings and international tours under the leadership of Owen Rees. The choir joins the Stanford Chamber Chorale, directed by Stephen M. Sano, in Memorial Church.

Concert April 5

Hosted by Department of Music, Office for Religious Life

MUSIC

CONVIVIUM

Convivium explores the ways in which choral music can be a force for transcendence, creativity and social justice in the 21st century. Under the leadership of founding director Eric Tuan, ’12, the 24 singers bring passionate performances of adventurous, thought-provoking repertoire to Bay Area audiences. Their quarterly concert programs present music from every corner of the choral world, while also exploring contemporary social issues like LGBT identity, war and globalization. They present quarterly Compline services of early music at Stanford Memorial Church.

Concert April 29

Hosted by Office for Religious Life

THEATER

FRANCES YA-CHU COWHIG

The Stanford Asian American Theater Project hosts a talk for students with The World Of Extreme Happiness playwright Frances Ya-Chu Cowhig.

Talk April 20

Hosted by Asian American Theater Project, ASSU Speakers Bureau, Forum for American/Chinese Exchange at Stanford (FACES), Stanford Arts, Department of Theater & Performance Studies

DANCE

DANSPACE

Danspace Project presents Variations on Themes from Lost and Found: Scenes from a Life and Other Works by John Bernd, a reconstruction and a re-imagining of work by choreographer John Bernd (1953-1988), a pivotal figure in the downtown NYC dance scene of the 1980s. Bernd was one of the first artists in that community to be diagnosed with HIV. Throughout his life he created interdisciplinary work dealing with themes of mortality, spirituality and queer intimacy. In this piece, conceived by Ishmael Houston-Jones, who danced in all three of Bernd’s series Lost and Found: Scenes from a Life, excerpts are reconfigured to create a new vision of his work that serves as a blueprint for what his work might have become.

Performances May 4 & 5

Hosted by Stanford Live

DANCE, MUSIC

CHANO DOMÍNGUEZ

Flamenco music, deeply passionate and tinged with improvisation, has long captivated jazz musicians, and pianist/composer Chano Domínguez is no exception. The program is drawn from his Grammy-nominated album Flamenco Sketches, an Iberian-inflected tribute to Miles Davis, and includes flamenco dancing and a new work written for his Piano Iberico ensemble.

Performances June 2

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

DOM FLEMONS

Oaxacan ensemble Pasatono Orquesta and acclaimed African-American folk musician Dom Flemons come together for an evening of music and discussion, exploring the black and indigenous roots of what we understand as American music, hosted by journalist and musician Rubén Martinez. Known as “The American Songster” for his repertoire of music covering nearly 100 years of American folklore, ballads and tunes, Flemons is a music historian and a multi-instrumentalist. In 2005, he cofounded the Carolina Chocolate Drops, who won a Grammy for Best Traditional Folk Album in 2010.

Concert May 23

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC, PERFORMANCE ART, VISUAL ART

GUILLERMO GALINDO

Departing from the art of music composition in search for the crossroads of expression, gal*in_dog (aka Guillermo Galindo), post-Mexican composer, has no borders. He presents his journey from academic composition to becoming a visual artist, cyber-totemic medium, performer and professional trouble maker. He traces back his endless pilgrimage as a sound assembler, psycho-healer, socio avant-garde advocate, reverse anthropologist and casual ritualistic practitioner. Galindo is the 2017-18 Mohr Visiting Artist hosted by the Department of Art & Art History.

Lecture May 15

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History, Stanford Arts

MUSIC

GLASS ANIMALS

The seventh annual Frost Music & Arts Festival features Glass Animals with Rayvn Lenae and Monty Booker. The event will take place in Stanford Stadium while the Frost Amphitheater is being renovated.

Concert May 19

Hosted by Stanford Concert Network

VISUAL ART

KEN GOLDBERG

Artist Ken Goldberg is a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and a pioneer in internet-based robotic telepresence and cloud robotics and automation. His inventions have been awarded eight U.S. patents and his artwork has 
been exhibited at Centre Pompidou, the Kwangju Biennale, The Kitchen and the Whitney Biennial. His Stanford lecture is titled “Is AI the New Frankenstein?”

Lecture April 17

Hosted by Department of Communication, Stanford Humanities Center, Taube Center for Jewish Studies

MUSIC

MELANIE GOLDSTEIN

The cello and piano duo of Melanie Goldstein and Kevin Sun perform works by Beethoven, Brahms and others.

Concert April 14

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

JONATHAN GOLOVE

The sixth “Reactions to the Record” symposium focuses on the Player Piano Project. The symposium includes presentations, panels, concerts and demonstrations highlighting the latest work being conducted on historical performance documents, especially player pianos and piano rolls. Guest artists include Bob Berkman on pianola and cellist/composer Jonathan Golove, associate professor of music at the University at Buffalo. Golove’s career is marked by its versatility, sense of adventure and commitment to performance.

Symposium April 6-8

Hosted by Department of Music, Stanford Arts Institute

VISUAL ART

DOUG HALL

Doug Hall is an internationally known artist who has worked for over 40 years in a wide range of media, including performance, installation, video and large-format photography. He was a founding member of the media art collective T. R. Uthco (1970-78) and he taught at the San Francisco Art Institute, where he is professor emeritus, from 1980 to 2008. In his Stanford lecture, Hall concentrates on four media installations that, with one exception, were completed within the past five years. Two of the works address his interest in landscape, both natural and industrial, while the other two relate more to his involvements in language and literature.

Lecture May 22

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History

Chrysopylae, two-channel video projection with sound, 2012; installation view, Fort Point, San Francisco. Conceived and directed by Doug Hall.

DANCE

RAMYA HARISHANKAR

Dancing Through the Diaspora is an interactive multimedia duet between Ramya Harishankar and Priya Srinivasan that explores the ways that performance as research can come alive. Based on Srinivasan’s book Sweating Saris: Indian Dance as Transnational Labor, which examines the history of Indian dance from 1880 to the present in the United States in relation to restrictive anti-Asian immigration policies between 1924 and 1965, the performance features her long relationship with Harishankar, her students and teaching processes while questioning dance as an aesthetic form and its relationship to socio-political, historical, cultural, racialized and gendered forms of power.

Performance April 23

Hosted by Center for South Asia

MUSIC

AKIKO HATEKYAMA

Akiko Hatekyama is a composer/performer of electroacoustic music and intermedia. She explores the boundaries between written music, improvisation, electronics, real-time computer-based interactivity and visual media. Storytelling, memories and nature play an important role in her work, and she most often finds beauty in simplicity.

Concert May 5

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

MUSIC

HEADNODIC

Bay Area DJ Headnodic takes the stage at the Bing Fling afterparty in the Bing Concert Hall’s Gunn Atrium.

Performance April 20

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

URIEL HERMAN

The Bing Studio Cabaret hosts the U.S. debut tour of Uriel Herman, a 29-year-old classically trained pianist and composer who operates on the seam between jazz, rock and grunge with influences of Israeli sound. Over the past two years, Herman has wandered the world on a journey of discovery with his quartet: Avri Borochov, contrabass; Uriel Weinberger, woodwinds; and Haim Peskoff, drums. Their newest album features arrangements of songs by Nirvana and Radiohead, poems set to new melodies and original music that has won international praise.

Concert April 29

Hosted by Stanford Live

Uriel Herman Quartet

MUSIC

HOT FLASH HEAT WAVE

Hot Flash Heat Wave is the brainchild of four best friends from Davis, California. During their high school years, they met and bonded through participation in a small, tight-knit community of musicians that put on a slew of DIY shows in parents’ garages and local venues, at the time each playing in a variety of different projects. After leaving Davis for various cities in California, the four eventually reunited in San Francisco to write and record under the same roof. Their debut LP, Neapolitan, released in 2015, quickly launched them to the forefront of the Bay Area music scene with its candied hooks, fuzzy guitars and tunes reminiscent of The Smiths gone new wave.

Concert May 11

Hosted by Stanford Concert Network, Stanford Live

MUSIC

INVOKE

Described as “not classical … but not not classical,” invoke continues to successfully dodge even the most valiant attempts at genre classification. The ensemble’s other “not-nots” encompass traditions from across America, including bluegrass, Appalachian fiddle tunes, jazz and minimalism. invoke weaves all of these threads together to create truly unique contemporary repertoire, written by and for the group. The Stanford performance includes traditional repertoire, as well as original compositions.

Concert May 2

Hosted by Department of Music

ARCHITECTURE

DOUGLAS C. JOHNSTON

The University Architect/Campus Planning and Design Office sponsors an annual spring lecture series in architecture and landscape architecture. The lectures provide the community an opportunity to hear nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field. This year the theme is volume, and Douglas C. Johnston, principal of William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc., of Boston, is one of the speakers. Johnston has led award-winning urban design and master planning projects.

Lecture May 23

Hosted by University Architect/Planning Office

ARCHITECTURE

SHARON JOHNSTON

The University Architect/Campus Planning and Design Office sponsors an annual spring lecture series in architecture and landscape architecture. The lectures provide the community an opportunity to hear nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field. This year the theme is volume, and Sharon Johnston, ’87, founder and partner of Johnston Marklee, is a guest speaker. Working with artists, fabricators and consulting engineers, Johnston directs teams to customize and integrate formal, material and component building systems into distinctive architectural solutions.

Lecture April 11

Hosted by University Architect/Planning Office

MUSIC

ROB KAPILOW

Joined by Marcus Shelby’s 10-piece jazz orchestra, Rob Kapilow continues his explorations of American identity in music, this time focusing on Duke Ellington. Shelby, a pre-eminent figure on the Bay Area jazz scene, is a bassist, arranger, composer, educator and activist focused on sharing the past, present and future of African-American music.

Concert April 11

Hosted by Stanford Live

ARCHITECTURE

MIKYOUNG KIM

The University Architect/Campus Planning and Design Office sponsors an annual spring lecture series in architecture and landscape architecture. The lectures provide the community an opportunity to hear nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field. This year the theme is volume, and Mikyoung Kim, founding principal of Mikyoung Kim Design, is a guest speaker. In her lecture, Kim discusses the interface of art and science in her most recent work: the merging of ecology and psychology with the art of landscape.

Lecture April 25

Hosted by University Architect/Planning Office

FILM, MUSIC

KRONOS QUARTET

More of an homage than a remake, The Green Fog stitches together over 200 snippets of movies and TV filmed in San Francisco – from ’50s film noir to Mrs. Doubtfire – to create a parallel universe version of Hitchcock’s thriller Vertigo. The resulting collage has little dialogue, letting the Jacob Garchik-penned score, performed live by the Kronos Quartet, amplify and intensify the action.

Screening and concert April 6

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

JOANNA MAJOKO

In a program first presented under the auspices of Jazz at Lincoln Center, the 1960s are explored through the work of three prolific artists: Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln and Nina Simone. Mitchell composed and sang about the freedom of love, Lincoln expressed freedom of her individuality and race through her lyricism, and Simone demanded freedom politically through song. To deliver this vast repertoire, drummer and music director Ulysses Owens Jr. leads three vocalists: Theo Bleckmann, a Grammy-nominated jazz singer of eclectic tastes and prodigious gifts; Alicia Olatuja, “a singer with a strong and luscious tone” (New York Times); and Joanna Majoko, a naturally gifted and multicultural artist born to German and Zimbabwean parents.

Concert April 19

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MANILA DISCO

Break out your bellbottoms and take a trip back in time to the disco songs of the Manila Sound, a musical genre that emerged in 1970s Filipino nightclubs and has seen a resurgence in recent years. Inspired by American disco, funk and pop, Manila Sound mixed Filipino musicality, catchy melodies and a laid-back style to create what some call the Golden Age of Pinoy music. The dance floor will be open, so get ready to boogie all night long.

Concert April 7

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

HISHAM MATAR

Hisham Matar was born in New York City to Libyan parents, spent his childhood in Tripoli and Cairo, and has lived most of his adult life in London. His critically acclaimed 2016 memoir, The Return: Fathers, Sons and the Land in Between, won the Pulitzer Prize for Autobiography and received the PEN America Book of the Year Award. His debut novel, In the Country of Men, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Matar’s work has been translated into 29 languages.

Lecture April 23

Hosted by Creative Writing Program

VISUAL ART

MÓNICA MAYER

Artists Mónica Mayer of Mexico and Joiri Minaya of New York and the Dominican Republic join Stanford’s Peggy Phelan to discuss the leading role women artists from the Americas have played in redefining performance art, its relationship to photography and film, and its status as an agent of social and political change.

Lecture April 12

Hosted by Cantor Arts Center

VISUAL ART

JOIRI MINAYA

Artists Mónica Mayer of Mexico and Joiri Minaya of New York and the Dominican Republic join Stanford’s Peggy Phelan to discuss the leading role women artists from the Americas have played in redefining performance art, its relationship to photography and film, and its status as an agent of social and political change.

Lecture April 12

Hosted by Cantor Arts Center

Joiri Minaya (Dominican Republic, b. United States, 1990), #dominicanwomengooglesearch, 2016. Digital print on sintra and fabric collage. Installation view at Wave Hill Sunroom Project Space, 2016. Photo: Stefan Hagen

MUSIC

ALI AKBAR MORADI

Iranian musician Ali Akbar Moradi is joined by his two sons, Kourosh and Arash, for the concert Tanbours, Epics and Mysticism. The elder Moradi plays the tanbour (Persian lute), considered the oldest string instrument of Iran. The concert contains a wide range of musical and technical variations, representing the rich musical and cultural heritage of Iran.

Concert May 5

Hosted by Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies, Persian Student Association

THEATER

MINA MORITA

Mina Morita directs The Good Person of Szechwan in Roble Studio Theater. Morita is the artistic director of Crowded Fire Theater, a critically acclaimed, intrepid, female-led company dedicated to developing a fierce contemporary theater canon that reflects the plurality of our world.

Performances May 17-19

Hosted by Department of Theater & Performance Studies

CREATIVE WRITING

WALTER MOSLEY

Novelist and social commentator Walter Mosley is best known for his crime fiction and his indelible narrator, Easy Rawlins. But Mosley is also a serious practitioner of science fiction. He employs the form not just to contemplate the culture as it is but to envision the trends that might point to our future. Over the course of a stunning series of novels and short stories – from “Blue Light” in 1998 to the Crosstown to Oblivion series to his most recent “Inside a Silver Box” – Mosley takes up genetic engineering, environmental fallout, societal collapse and the tenaciousness of racial divisions in American life. After a short reading, Mosley, he will be in conversation with Scott Hutchins, lecturer in creative writing.

Conversation May 15

Hosted by Continuing Studies, Creative Writing Project, McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society, Stanford Storytelling Project

MUSIC

MS. WHITE

Give Face is Stanford’s very own fierce, fabulous, fantastic drag show. Ms. White is a New York City–based jazz-pop artist documenting her relationships and gender transition through music. Her debut EP Jade is a critique of the male-centric music industry and a fierce declaration of womanhood. An homage to the late Amy Jade Winehouse, Jade links Ms. White’s femininity with that of her idols.

Performance April 27

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

RUBY NAMDAR

Writer Ruby Namdar was born and raised in Jerusalem to a family of Iranian-Jewish heritage. His first book, Haviv (2000), won the Israel Ministry of Culture’s Award for Best First Publication. His novel The Ruined House won the Sapir Prize, which is Israel’s most prestigious literary award. In The Ruined House, an elegant NYU professor at the peak of his powers is reduced to a quivering puddle by a violent, unsought, yearlong spiritual awakening. Jumping between New York of 2000 and the Holy Temple in Jerusalem, the novel presents a Jewish-American tale, merging reality with myth, brutality with fragility.

Lecture May 10

Hosted by Division of Literatures, Cultures and Languages, Taube Center for Jewish Studies

MUSIC

ARTURO O’FARRILL AFRO-LATIN JAZZ ORCHESTRA

The Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra of pianist Arturo O’Farrill, a two-time Grammy winner, reaches beyond his trumpeter father Chico O’Farrill’s Afro-Cuban jazz to embrace many Latin American music traditions. This Bing program features the Cornel West Concerto, which sets text by virtuosic speaker, scholar and activist Dr. Cornel West to Afro-Latin jazz orchestration.

Concert May 9

Hosted by Stanford Live

ARCHITECTURE

LUKE OGRYDZIAK

The University Architect/Campus Planning and Design Office sponsors an annual spring lecture series in architecture and landscape architecture. The lectures provide the community an opportunity to hear nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field. This year the theme is volume, and Luke Ogrydziak, principal of Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects, is a guest speaker. OPA is a progressive San Francisco-based office that has been globally recognized for projects ranging in scale from institutions to private homes, as well as interior and object design.

Lecture May 9

Hosted by University Architect/Planning Office

MUSIC

ALICIA OLATUJA

In a program first presented under the auspices of Jazz at Lincoln Center, the 1960s are explored through the work of three prolific artists: Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln and Nina Simone. Mitchell composed and sang about the freedom of love, Lincoln expressed freedom of her individuality and race through her lyricism, and Simone demanded freedom politically through song. To deliver this vast repertoire, drummer and music director Ulysses Owens Jr. leads three vocalists: Theo Bleckmann, a Grammy-nominated jazz singer of eclectic tastes and prodigious gifts; Alicia Olatuja, “a singer with a strong and luscious tone” (New York Times); and Joanna Majoko, a naturally gifted and multicultural artist born to German and Zimbabwean parents.

Concert April 19

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ULYSSES OWENS JR.

In a program first presented under the auspices of Jazz at Lincoln Center, the 1960s are explored through the work of three prolific artists: Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln and Nina Simone. Mitchell composed and sang about the freedom of love, Lincoln expressed freedom of her individuality and race through her lyricism, and Simone demanded freedom politically through song. To deliver this vast repertoire, drummer and music director Ulysses Owens Jr. leads three vocalists: Theo Bleckmann, a Grammy-nominated jazz singer of eclectic tastes and prodigious gifts; Alicia Olatuja, “a singer with a strong and luscious tone” (New York Times); and Joanna Majoko, a naturally gifted and multicultural artist born to German and Zimbabwean parents.

Concert April 19

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

PASATONO ORQUESTA

Oaxacan ensemble Pasatono Orquesta and acclaimed African-American folk musician Dom Flemons come together for an evening of music and discussion, exploring the black and indigenous roots of what we understand as American music, hosted by journalist and musician Rubén Martinez. Dedicated to rescuing and reinterpreting the sounds of the endangered musical cultures of rural Mixteca communities, Pasatono Orquesta blends traditional instruments, indigenous rhythms and modern arrangements. Festive with a touch of nostalgia, their music has played for audiences from Centro Nacional de las Artes in Mexico City to Lincoln Center in New York.

Concert May 23

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA AND CHORALE

Nicholas McGegan, PBO’s founder, takes the podium for Cherubini’s Chant sur la mort de Joseph Haydn and early Beethoven works including the Mass in C Major, Op. 86, and the Fantasia in C Minor, Op. 80, Choral Fantasy. Bruce Lamott directs the Philharmonia Chorale, with Eric Zivian on the fortepiano.

Concert April 25

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

KAREN BENTLEY POLLICK

Karen Bentley Pollick returns to CCRMA to present multimedia audio/visual pieces by current faculty, staff and students. The concert includes works by Professor Jonathan Berger, Constantin Basica and Christopher Jette.

Concert May 26

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

ARCHITECTURE

ZOË PRILLINGER

The University Architect/Campus Planning and Design Office sponsors an annual spring lecture series in architecture and landscape architecture. The lectures provide the community an opportunity to hear nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field. This year the theme is volume, and Zoë Prillinger, principal of Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects, is a guest speaker. OPA is a progressive San Francisco-based office that has been globally recognized for projects ranging in scale from institutions to private homes, as well as interior and object design.

Lecture May 9

Hosted by University Architect/Planning Office

MUSIC

STEPHEN PRUTSMAN

Returning to its roots, the St. Lawrence String Quartet performs music by Canadian composer R. Murray Schafer, in addition to Haydn’s String Quartet in C Major, Op. 33, No. 3, and Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s Opus 15 Piano Quintet with longtime collaborator Stephen Prutsman, piano.

Concert April 29

Hosted by Department of Music, Stanford Live

MUSIC

RAGAZZI BOYS CHORUS

Ragazzi sings Bing! Returning for the first time since the inaugural season, Ragazzi will perform in full force with all the boys, from small to tall. Alums of all Ragazzi generations come together to recreate the unparalleled experience they shared growing up as Ragazzi choristers. This concert, which has been 30 years in the making, features old favorites, new works and countless rewards.

Concert June 10

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

CLAUDIA RANKINE

African-American poet Claudia Rankine, professor at Yale University, speaks to the human condition in all its many manifestations. A winner of the 2016 MacArthur Fellowship and author of five poetry collections, including Citizen – An American Lyric and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely, Rankine candidly and critically uses poetry and prose to explore what it means to be an American citizen in a “post-racial” society.

Conversation May 16

Hosted by Stanford Live

ARCHITECTURE

GREG REAVES

The University Architect/Campus Planning and Design Office sponsors an annual spring lecture series in architecture and landscape architecture. The lectures provide the community an opportunity to hear nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field. This year the theme is volume, and Greg Reaves, principal of Safdie Architects, is a guest speaker. Safdie Architects is an architecture and urban design studio imbued with a spirit of idealism and innovation. The practice is research oriented and forward thinking, drawing upon a depth of experience to solve contemporary building challenges in imaginative and unexpected ways.

Lecture June 7

Hosted by University Architect/Planning Office

MUSIC

SAINT MICHAEL TRIO

The Saint Michael Trio (Robin Sharp, violin; Russell Hancock, piano; Michel Flexer, cello) is hailed as Silicon Valley’s update to the classical music scene. Established in 2007, they are considered California’s premiere piano trio, and their recordings inspire ongoing accolades in the national press. They receive special praise for making their concerts interesting, accessible and often funny. The Mendelssohn F Minor Piano Quartet serves as the focus of an “informance” by the trio that utilizes slides, demonstrations and commentary.

Informance April 14

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Join us for an evening of lyrical chamber music of Johannes Brahms, featuring outstanding contralto Karen R. Clark and San Francisco Chamber Orchestra All-Stars Michael Graham on cello, Karen Rosenak on piano and Ben Simon on viola. The performance includes Two Songs and the autumnal Trio in A Minor, originally written for clarinet but arranged for viola for this performance. This program features a short presentation by host Ben Simon on Brahms’ life and times, as well as a discussion of the music to be presented.

Concert May 12

Hosted by Continuing Studies

MUSIC

SCAPEGOAT

scapegoat is an experimental saxophone and percussion duo. Close creative collaboration and multimedia projects form the basis of their pursuit for artistic innovation and expression. Their programs are designed to broaden and challenge the musical experience of the audience through original works featuring live electronics, performer-controlled sonic and visual amplification, video and lighting design, and improvisation.

Concert April 10

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

CREATIVE WRITING

RUTA SEPETYS

An open-air celebration of literature features three prominent writers who have explored themes of Baltic exile, reckoning and hope in their work. Ruta Sepetys is the author of the riveting novel Between Shades of Gray, which deals with one Lithuanian family’s harrowing journey to Siberia and their daily struggle for survival in a labor camp. Julija Šukys uses letters, documents and oral histories to weave together a compelling portrait of her Lithuanian grandparents in Siberian Exile: Blood, War and a Granddaughter’s Reckoning. In her poetic memoir, Among the Living and the Dead: A Tale of Exile and Homecoming on the War Roads of Europe, Inara Verzemnieks writes about her visit to the Latvian village of her predecessors, exploring the tragic consequences of war and exile.

Readings June 3

Hosted by Stanford University Libraries

 

MUSIC

MARCUS SHELBY

Joined by Marcus Shelby’s 10-piece jazz orchestra, Rob Kapilow continues his explorations of American identity in music, this time focusing on Duke Ellington. Shelby, a preeminent figure on the Bay Area jazz scene, is a bassist, arranger, composer, educator and activist focused on sharing the past, present and future of African-American music.

Concert April 11

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

BEN SIMON

Join us for an evening of lyrical chamber music of Johannes Brahms, featuring outstanding contralto Karen R. Clark and San Francisco Chamber Orchestra All-Stars Michael Graham on cello, Karen Rosenak on piano and Ben Simon on viola. The performance includes Two Songs and the autumnal Trio in A Minor, originally written for clarinet but arranged for viola for this performance. This program features a short presentation by host Ben Simon on Brahms’ life and times, as well as a discussion of the music to be presented. Simon is in his 16th season as music director of the SFCO and he is also the music director of the award-winning youth ensemble Palo Alto Chamber Orchestra, which rehearses and performs down the road from Stanford.

Concert May 12

Hosted by Continuing Studies

DANCE

PRIYA SRINIVASAN

Dancing Through the Diaspora is an interactive multimedia duet between Ramya Harishankar and Priya Srinivasan that explores the ways that performance as research can come alive. Based on Srinivasan’s book Sweating Saris: Indian Dance as Transnational Labor, which examines the history of Indian dance from 1880 to the present in the United States in relation to restrictive anti-Asian immigration policies between 1924 and 1965, the performance features her long relationship with Harishankar, her students and teaching processes while questioning dance as an aesthetic form and its relationship to socio-political, historical, cultural, racialized and gendered forms of power.

Performance April 23

Hosted by Center for South Asia

MUSIC

NANO STERN

Singer and guitarist Nano Stern is riding the crest of the new wave of Chilean Song, with a style that is indie-folk-rock-jazz fusion. His stature has risen to the point of being woven into Chile’s cultural history, and he fills theaters and halls across the country. Since his U.S. debut performances at SXSW in March 2014, Stern has toured across Canada and the United States, with appearances at the Kennedy Center and for Joan Baez’s 75th birthday celebration at New York’s historic Beacon Theatre. His path as an artist follows richly crafted song lines laid by his family and his Chilean musical ancestry, and his sound is utterly fresh and relevant.

Concert April 28

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

JULIJA ŠUKYS

An open-air celebration of literature features three prominent writers who have explored themes of Baltic exile, reckoning and hope in their work. Ruta Sepetys is the author of the riveting novel Between Shades of Gray, which deals with one Lithuanian family’s harrowing journey to Siberia and their daily struggle for survival in a labor camp. Julija Šukys uses letters, documents and oral histories to weave together a compelling portrait of her Lithuanian grandparents in Siberian Exile: Blood, War and a Granddaughter’s Reckoning. In her poetic memoir, Among the Living and the Dead: A Tale of Exile and Homecoming on the War Roads of Europe, Inara Verzemnieks writes about her visit to the Latvian village of her predecessors, exploring the tragic consequences of war and exile.

Readings June 3

Hosted by Stanford University Libraries

MUSIC

KEVIN SUN

The cello and piano duo of Melanie Goldstein and Kevin Sun perform works of Beethoven, Brahms and others.

Concert April 14

Hosted by Department of Music

VISUAL ART

SARAH SZE

Sarah Sze is the Bobbie and Mike Wilsey Distinguished Lecturer for 2018. Since the late 1990s, Sze (b. 1969) has developed a signature visual language that challenges the static nature of sculpture. Drawing from modernist traditions of the found object, she dismantles their authority with dynamic constellations of materials that are charged with flux, transformation and fragility. Sze represented the United States at the Venice Biennale in 2013. She was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 2003 and a Radcliffe Fellowship in 2005.

Lecture May 10

Hosted by Cantor Arts Center

MUSIC

AKIRA TANA

Spend an evening with the music of James Bond films. Bay Area jazz drummer Akira Tana and his Secret Agent Band – including vocalist Annie Sellick with James Mahone, sax; Jeff Massanari, guitar; and Midori Ono, organ – delve into the world of Bond, shaken and stirred, with lush arrangements that reimagine “Nobody Does It Better,” “Live and Let Die,” “Goldfinger” and more.

Concerts April 14

Hosted by Stanford Live

ARCHITECTURE

ERIK TELLANDER

The University Architect/Campus Planning and Design Office sponsors an annual spring lecture series in architecture and landscape architecture. The lectures provide the community an opportunity to hear nationally and internationally renowned experts in the field. This year the theme is volume, and Erik Tellander, senior associate at William Rawn Associates, Architects, Inc., of Boston, is one of the speakers. William Rawn Associates is committed to buildings participating in the civic or public realm – buildings in the city or buildings in important public landscape settings.

Lecture May 23

Hosted by University Architect/Planning Office

MUSIC

WILFRIDO TERRAZAS

For Alta: Flute Music from Mexican Composers in California, Wilfrido Terrazas performs his own composition for flute and recent works by Carmina Escobar, Guillermo Galindo, Iván Naranjo, Mauricio Rodriguez and Pablo Rubio, offering a vivid picture of contemporary Mexican composers based in California. Pure and fresh forms of musical expression come together to broaden the musical map of a most uncompromising acoustic art.

Concert May 10

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

PERFORMANCE ART

KEIJAUN THOMAS

Keijaun Thomas (New York City) creates live performance and multimedia installations that oscillate between movement and materials that function as tools, objects and structures, as well as a visual language that can be read, observed and repeated within spatial, temporal and sensorial environments. Their work investigates the histories, symbols and images that construct notions of black identity within black personhood.

Performances May 3 & 4

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History, Department of Theater & Performance Studies, Stanford Arts, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education

CREATIVE WRITING

INARA VERZEMNIEKS

An open-air celebration of literature features three prominent writers who have explored themes of Baltic exile, reckoning and hope in their work. Ruta Sepetys is the author of the riveting novel Between Shades of Gray, which deals with one Lithuanian family’s harrowing journey to Siberia and their daily struggle for survival in a labor camp. Julija Šukys uses letters, documents and oral histories to weave together a compelling portrait of her Lithuanian grandparents in Siberian Exile: Blood, War and a Granddaughter’s Reckoning. In her poetic memoir, Among the Living and the Dead: A Tale of Exile and Homecoming on the War Roads of Europe, Inara Verzemnieks writes about her visit to the Latvian village of her predecessors, exploring the tragic consequences of war and exile.

Readings June 3

Hosted by Stanford University Libraries

FILM

JOHN WATERS

John Waters has been called the Sultan of Sleaze, the Prince of Puke and the King of Schlock – all titles he wears proudly. For 50 years, the Baltimore-born director has been shocking and delighting audiences with his hilariously transgressive cult films (Hairspray, Pink Flamingos, Serial Mom) that subvert nostalgic visions of American suburbia. Waters went from a local boy making cheap underground movies – finding talent at local bars, getting arrested and being thrown out of college – to making counterculture comedies in the Hollywood system. SFFILM Executive Director Noah Cowan interviews the iconic filmmaker.

Conversation April 18

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

QIU ZHIJIE

Nearly a decade ago, Qiu Zhijie began to plot out intricate maps of the relationships among his various artworks. It was from this synthesis of research, writing, imagination and action that the Mapping the World Project was born. In the hundreds of maps that have followed, the ink and brushwork of landscape painting outlines a coordinate system which condenses ideas, individuals, objects, incidents and situations, weaving them together and offering a possibility for understanding them in relation to each other.

Lecture April 26

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History