Winter quarter 2019 guest artists

Dozens of guest artists on campus this quarter grace the stages of multiple performance and lecture venues.

Dozens of guest artists on campus this quarter grace the stages of multiple performance and lecture venues, and some are spending an extended amount of time with students in the classroom.

The Mohr Visiting Artist Program brings acclaimed and emerging artists to campus for a one-term period to teach a credited course and provide a presentation, exhibition or performance for the Stanford community and the public. This quarter the Department of Music hosts Mohr Visiting Artist Joshua Redman, one of the most acclaimed and charismatic jazz artists to have emerged in the decade of the 1990s. The Department of Theater and Performance Studies hosts Mohr Visiting Artist Jonah Bokaer, who has cultivated a new form of both visual art and design. Presidential Artist Kerry Tribe, a visual artist working primarily in film, video and installation, is teaching Art in the Age of Neuroscience and Mohr Visiting Poet in the Department of English Louise Glück is teaching The Occasions of Poetry. The Department of Art and Art History hosts Holt Visiting Artist Sheila Pepe, who is teaching the art studio course Sculpture: Votives, Totems, and Sanctuaries. Other artists are guest lecturing in the classroom and giving career talks to students throughout the quarter.

The full roster of 85+ winter quarter guest artists follows.

Winter quarter guest artists for 2019, inside and outside of the classroom

PERFORMANCE

2b THEATRE COMPANY

A love story about Romanian Jewish refugees arriving in Canada in 1908, Old Stock, A Refugee Love Story might apply to any time, any person who has ever sought refuge from oppression. A music-theater work starring rising actor Ben Caplan and laced with the klezmer music of the Eastern European shtetl, Old Stock illuminates the ability to love even after the horrors of war.

Performances Mar. 16 & 17

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

HANNAH ADDARIO-BERRY

Toward the end of his all-too-brief life, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote some of his greatest works; his final symphonies and operas are well-beloved masterpieces. There are lesser-known masterpieces as well, including the six-movement Divertimento Trio, which transcends its genre with some of Mozart’s most beautiful and dramatic chamber music writing. Continuing Studies presents a guided musical tour of this amazing work, followed by a complete performance by three of the Bay Area’s outstanding chamber musicians: Kay Stern, violin; Ben Simon, viola; and Hannah Addario-Berry, cello. Addario-Berry specializes in chamber music and solo repertoire, particularly music by living composers. She is a member of the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra and the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, and has released two solo albums, Lady in the East and Scordatura.

Performance Feb. 9

Hosted by Continuing Studies

MUSIC

AUSTRALIAN CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

In the Australian Chamber Orchestra, founded in 1975, all the players except the cellists stand, all concert long. They are full of energy and ready to take on anything. The Stanford program, played on period instruments (including priceless Guarneris and Strads), will include the U.S. premiere of Samuel Adams’ Concerto Grosso (a Stanford Live co-commission); Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 12 in A Major, K313 with Paul Lewis, piano; and Brahms’ Sextet in G Major, Op. 36, arranged for string orchestra.

Performance Mar. 31

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

CLARENCE BARLOW

Composer Clarence Barlow will give a talk about his multichannel electroacoustic pieces Five Dodecaphonic Pieces, Approximating Pi and Four ISIS Studies. After the talk, these works will be played in a concert in alternation with Chryssie Nanou performing a selection of preludes and fugues for piano from Barlow’s Ludus Ragalis.

Talk and performance Jan. 18

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

DANCE

BATSHEVA DANCE COMPANY

Batsheva’s artistic director, Ohad Naharin, is widely considered to be one of the great dance pioneers of his generation. In Venezuela, choreographer Naharin and his dancers explore the dialogue and conflict between movement and content through two 40-minute sections performed back to back. Gradually we become aware that the second section is choreographed identically to the first, but everything about it has changed. How? And why? The endless possibilities of a choreographer’s craft are at play, and in turn, Venezuela compels the audience to challenge their own freedom of choice.

Performance Mar. 12

Hosted by Stanford Live

FILM

ARI BINUS

Through intimate interviews and live performances, the documentary They Played for Their Lives artfully portrays how music saved the lives of young Jewish musicians through the nightmare years of the Holocaust. The film’s director, Nurit Jugend, and illustrator, Ari Binus, will be in conversation with radio host Michael Krasny after the screening. Binus studied painting at Boston University’s College of Fine Arts. He has illustrated five children’s books for various publishing houses and has created storyboards and artwork for use in numerous documentaries and short films. He also consults for a wide range of other storytelling and creative communications projects, such as writing song lyrics for video game music and narration scripts for video game cinematics.

Screening and conversation Jan. 27

Hosted by Continuing Studies

DANCE

JONAH BOKAER

Brooklyn-based Tunisian American artist Jonah Bokaer has cultivated a new form of choreography merged with visual art and design. He is the author of 60 original works produced around the world. As a Mohr Visiting Artist, in winter quarter he is teaching DANCE 119: Special Topics: Dance, Architecture, Technology.

Winter teaching residency

Hosted by Department of Theater and Performance Studies

MUSIC

JUSTIN VIVIAN BOND

Mx Justin Vivian Bond is a trans-genre artist living in New York City. As a performer both on- and off-Broadway, Mx Bond has received numerous accolades, including an Obie (2001), a Bessie (2004), a Tony nomination (2007), the Ethyl Eichelberger Award (2007), a Peter Reed Foundation Grant and a Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants to Artists Award. V authored the Lambda Literary Award winning memoir TANGO: My Childhood, Backwards and in High Heels (The Feminist Press, 2011). V performs with pianist Matt Ray.

Performances Mar. 8 & 9

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ROBI BOTOS

Multi-instrumentalist Robi Botos is one of several musicians performing in A Tribute to the Late Oscar Peterson, hosted by Peterson’s daughter Céline. Oscar Peterson was one of the finest pianists of the 20th century. It was not widely known that this man Duke Ellington dubbed “the maharajah of the keyboard,” beloved by jazz and classical audiences alike, was also a prolific composer. During the course of the year in 2015, 17 jazz greats were gathered by Kelly Peterson, the pianist’s widow, to change this. The result is this unique program and the recording Oscar, With Love. Botos will be joined by Benny Green, Bill Charlap, Renee Rosnes, Gerald Clayton, Justin Kauflin and Dave Young.

Performance Mar. 22

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

BRANFORD MARSALIS QUARTET

New Orleans native and National Endowment of the Arts Jazz Master Branford Marsalis got his professional start with Clark Terry and brother Wynton Marsalis in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. In 1986, Branford formed the Branford Marsalis Quartet, adding guest vocalist Kurt Elling. Their first album, Upward Spiral, was nominated for a 2017 Grammy. After the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Marsalis partnered with Harry Connick Jr. to found the Musicians’ Village in New Orleans – a place where artists work to preserve and reconstruct their beloved community.

Performance Jan. 16

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MARNIE BRECKENRIDGE

The Stanford Symphonic Chorus performs Vaughan Williams’ A Sea Symphony with the Stanford Symphony Orchestra, featuring Marnie Breckenridge, soprano soloist, and Kenneth Goodson, baritone soloist.

Performance Mar. 1

Hosted by Department of Music, Associated Students of Stanford University

MUSIC

BRENTANO STRING QUARTET

From the acclaimed Brentano String Quartet comes Lamentations, a stunning compendium of songs and compositions that represent catharsis during times of heartbreak. Stories within the works can help give form to grief, so that it becomes a distinct entity instead of occupying the bereaved’s whole being. At the Bing, Brentano performs Purcell’s “Dido’s Lament,” Bartók’s Second Quartet, Shostakovich (from his Lady Macbeth of Mtensk) and Haydn’s Seven Last Words.

Performance Feb. 8

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

YEFIM BRONFMAN

One of the world’s most acclaimed pianists, Yefim Bronfman has a career as a concert artist that is matched only by his accomplishments as a soloist. He debuted at Carnegie Hall in 1989 and Avery Fisher Hall in 1993, having won its prestigious Avery Fisher Prize in 1991. That year, he and violinist Isaac Stern gave a series of joint recitals in Russia in Bronfman’s first public performance there since age 15, when he emigrated with his  family from Tashkent to Israel and then to the United States.

Performance Jan. 26

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

LAWRENCE BROWNLEE

Acclaimed artists Lawrence Brownlee (tenor) and Eric Owens (bass-baritone) share the stage in arias and duets by Bizet, Mozart and Verdi alongside American songs and spirituals. Brownlee, an exemplary bel canto artist, sang at the Met as Almaviva in The Barber of Seville and Tonio in The Daughter of the Regiment. Owens won the prestigious Metropolitan Opera Auditions in 1996 and went on to create the role of General Leslie Groves in John Adams’ Dr. Atomic at San Francisco Opera. He sang the role of Alberich in the Met’s new production of Wagner’s Ring cycle.

Performance Feb. 15

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

THOMAS BUCKNER

New Music baritone Thomas Buckner performs Songs Without Words, for voice (no text) and electronics written by some of the most pioneering composers in experimental music.

Performance Mar. 14

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

MUSIC

BEN CAPLAN

Ben Caplan is a songwriter, performer and entertainer in the most time-honored sense of the word. You can feel Caplan’s comfort and ease as he strides in front of a crowd and begins a controlled collective descent into chaos. In his latest project, Caplan explores themes of immigration, loss, darkness, love, sex and God. This late night set takes place after Caplan’s performance of Old Stock: A Refugee Love Story.

Performance Mar. 16

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

CHA WA

From funk-laced beats and bass-heavy sousaphone blasts to the gritty warmth of singer J’Wan Boudreaux’s voice, New Orleans brass band-meets-Mardi Gras Indian outfit Cha Wa radiates the fiery energy of the Crescent City’s street culture. Cha Wa’s debut album, Funk ’N’ Feathers, explored contemporary riffs on the traditional music Boudreaux grew up singing alongside his grandfather, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, in the Golden Eagles Mardi Gras tribe.

Two performances Jan. 25

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

BILL CHARLAP

Jazz pianist Bill Charlap is one of several musicians performing in A Tribute to the Late Oscar Peterson, hosted by Peterson’s daughter Céline. Oscar Peterson was one of the finest pianists of the 20th century. It was not widely known that this man Duke Ellington dubbed “the maharajah of the keyboard,” beloved by jazz and classical audiences alike, was also a prolific composer. During the course of the year in 2015, 17 jazz greats were gathered by Kelly Peterson, the pianist’s widow, to change this. The result is this unique program and recording Oscar, With Love. Charlap will be joined by Benny Green, Robi Botos, Renee Rosnes, Gerald Clayton, Justin Kauflin and Dave Young.

Performance Mar. 22

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MINDY ELLA CHU

The Stanford Chamber Chorale presents Duruflé’s elegant and evocative Requiem in collaboration with soloists Mindy Ella Chu, mezzo soprano, and Nikolas Nackley, baritone; the St. Lawrence String Quartet and their visiting guests in the Emerging String Quartet Program, the Omer Quartet; and University Organist Robert Huw Morgan. Also on the program will be Duruflé’s a cappella choral works, Quatre Motets sur des thèmes grégoriens and Notre Père. This performance will be in preparation for recording sessions of this repertoire that will take place the following week.

Performance Feb. 15

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

GERALD CLAYTON

Jazz pianist Gerald Clayton is one of several musicians performing in A Tribute to the Late Oscar Peterson, hosted by Peterson’s daughter Céline. Oscar Peterson was one of the finest pianists of the 20th century. It was not widely known that this man Duke Ellington dubbed “the maharajah of the keyboard,” beloved by jazz and classical audiences alike, was also a prolific composer. During the course of the year in 2015, 17 jazz greats were gathered by Kelly Peterson, the pianist’s widow, to change this. The result is this unique program and recording Oscar, With Love. Clayton will be joined by Benny Green, Robi Botos, Renee Rosnes, Bill Cherlap, Justin Kauflin and Dave Young.

Performance Mar. 22

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

WILLIAM CORDOVA

Born in Lima, Peru, and now working in the U.S., William Cordova creates artwork that deals with his real-life issues of transition and displacement. He investigates the differences in culture, language and economics through his installations, drawings and sculptures that combine discarded materials and ephemera – such as old shoes, tires and books – to withdraw and reconsider their cultural and historical significance. He is participating in a symposium on the art of Michael Richards titled Flight, Diaspora, Identity, & Afterlife.

Symposium Feb. 8

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History

FILM

CARLTON CUSE

Carlton Cuse is an Emmy, Peabody and Golden Globe winning television creator, writer and showrunner. His credits include Lost, Bates Motel, Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan and the upcoming show Locke & Key for Netflix. He joins students for an Art is My Occupation (AiMO) roundtable luncheon.

Roundtable lunch Feb. 28

Hosted by Office of the Vice President for the Arts

MUSIC

CUT CIRCLE

“To love another – would humiliate my heart,” sings the devoted lover in the famous song “D’ung aultre amer,” evoking the power of love to captivate, nourish and, on occasion, destroy. Love can be earthly and sensual; it can also be spiritual and divine, as when a biblical figure is cast as the object of desire. In this program, led by Jesse Rodin, Stanford associate professor of music, Cut Circle performs music of both romantic and spiritual intensity by Du Fay, Ockeghem, Josquin and their contemporaries.

Performance Feb. 10

Hosted by Stanford Live

DANCE

DANCENORTH

Part ritual, part trance, part dance party, Attractor is a collaboration between DanceNorth with the music duo Senyawa, as well as choreographers Lucy Guerin and Gideon Obarzanek. Senyawa reinterprets Javanese trance-dance and music to give it a contemporary spin, borrowing from metal bands such as Black Sabbath, Metallica and Iron Maiden. Come experience the power of music and dance to break boundaries and create heightened states of energy.

Performances Jan. 24 & 25

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

FRED HERSCH TRIO

A select member of jazz’s piano pantheon, Fred Hersch is a pervasively influential creative force who has shaped the music’s course over more than three decades as an improviser, composer, educator, bandleader, collaborator and recording artist. He has been proclaimed “the most arrestingly innovative pianist in jazz over the last decade” by Vanity Fair, “an elegant force of musical invention” by the Los Angeles Times and “a living legend” by The New Yorker. In his memoir, Good Things Happen Slowly, the 12-time Grammy nominee describes his experiences as one of the first openly gay, HIV-positive musicians in the cloistered jazz world.

Two performances Jan. 18

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ULI GEISSENDOERFER

Uli Geissendoerfer is a Grammy-nominated  jazz and world music pianist and composer. Together, Alicia Svigals and Geissendoerfer perform the melodies rescued by Jewish scholar Moshe Beregovski, in settings that both recreate the lost world which gave them birth and re-contextualize them for the 21st century.

Performance Feb. 19

Hosted by Taube Center for Jewish Studies

CREATIVE WRITING

LOUISE GLÜCK

Louise Glück is the author of 11 books of poetry, including Averno, The Seven Ages, Vita Nova, Meadowlands, The Wild Iris, Ararat and The Triumph of Achilles. Her awards include the Pulitzer Prize, the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Bollingen Prize in Poetry, the Lannan Literary Award for Poetry and the MIT Anniversary Medal. For her collection of essays, Proofs and Theories: Essays on Poetry, Glück won the PEN/Martha Albrand Award for Nonfiction, and she received the 2008 Wallace Stevens Award for “outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry.” Glück was U.S. Poet Laureate for 2003-04. She is the Mohr Visiting Poet in the Department of English and is teaching The Occasions of Poetry winter quarter.

Winter teaching residency

Hosted by Creative Writing Program

MUSIC

BENNY GREEN

Jazz pianist Benny Green is one of several musicians performing in A Tribute to the Late Oscar Peterson, hosted by Peterson’s daughter Céline. Oscar Peterson was one of the finest pianists of the 20th century. It was not widely known that this man Duke Ellington dubbed “the maharajah of the keyboard,” beloved by jazz and classical audiences alike, was also a prolific composer. During the course of the year in 2015, 17 jazz greats were gathered by Kelly Peterson, the pianist’s widow, to change this. The result is this unique program and recording Oscar, With Love. Green will be joined by Bill Cherlap, Robi Botos, Renee Rosnes, Gerald Clayton, Justin Kauflin and Dave Young.

Performance Mar. 22

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

HALF STRADDLE

A theatrical pop song cycle that shifts expectations of theater and live music, Ghost Rings burrows and soars through the layers of love among best friends and a family band of yesteryear to create a feminist reclamation of what makes a rock star. With text and lyrics by Tina Satter and music by Chris Giarmo and Erin Markey, the narrative contrasts romantic memories of two friends with Satter’s real-life relationship to her estranged sister. She plays in an invented band with her Half Straddle collaborators in this vulnerable and harrowingly funny melodic reckoning.

Performances Feb. 14-16

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

TAMMY HALL

Two wonderful Bay Area artists – the dynamic duo of vocalist Kim Nalley and pianist Tammy Hall – honor the one and only Aretha Franklin.

Two performances Mar. 23

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

DAWN HARMS

From Bach to the Orange Blossom Special, Dawn Harms presents a family music show to delight children – who might find themselves playing a violin for the first time, or composing a piece right before your very eyes and ears. There is something for everyone that is both entertaining and educational.

Two performances Feb. 25

Hosted by Department of Music, Friends of Music at Stanford

MUSIC

IMAMYAR HASANOV

Imamyar Hasanov, master-musician, performs with music Professor Denise Gill and the students of MUSIC 187: Music and Culture from the Land of Fire: Introduction to Azerbaijani Mugham. The program is titled “Spiritual Sounds of Central Asia.”

Performance Mar. 16 

Hosted by the Department of Music

VISUAL ART

LONNIE HOLLEY

Contemporary artist and musician Lonnie Holley will be in conversation with Aleesa Alexander, assistant curator of American art at the Cantor Arts Center. Holley will perform selections from his new album, MITH.

Conversation and performance Mar. 8

Hosted by Cantor Arts Center

MUSIC

JACK QUARTET

The acclaimed St. Lawrence String Quartet, a beloved linchpin of Stanford and Stanford Live, presents its Sundays with the St. Lawrence series, a matinee array of chamber outings in many modes. The acclaimed modern JACK Quartet joins in for a lively series of new works played by great musicians.

Performance Jan. 20

Hosted by Department of Music, Stanford Live

MUSIC

INGRID JENSEN

Michael Galisatus directs the Stanford Jazz Orchestra’s program, featuring guest artist Ingrid Jensen, the Canadian trumpet player who has been nominated for several Juno awards, winning one for her first album, Vernal Fields.

Performance Feb. 20

Hosted by Department of Music, Associated Students of Stanford University

MUSIC

JOHN SANTOS SEXTET

Grammy nominee and Bay Area mainstay John Santos and his stellar band are experts on the historical and cultural significance of Latin jazz. At the Bing, Santos reflects on sacred traditions from Cuba that have birthed and influenced popular music and dance in Afro-America and around the world. This ancestral ritual of rhythm, melody and movement is the thread that connects us to peace, to joy, to family—and to the sweet memories that represent a home for which we all yearn.

Performance Feb. 9

Hosted by Stanford Live

FILM

NURIT JUGEND

Through intimate interviews and live performances, the documentary They Played for Their Lives artfully portrays how music saved the lives of young Jewish musicians through the nightmare years of the Holocaust. The film’s director,  Nurit Jugend, and illustrator, Ari Binus, will be in conversation with Michael Krasny after the screening.

Screening and conversation Jan. 27

Hosted by Continuing Studies

MUSIC

JUSTIN KAUFLIN

Jazz pianist, composer, producer and educator Justin Kauflin is one of several musicians performing in A Tribute to the Late Oscar Peterson, hosted by Peterson’s daughter Céline. Oscar Peterson was one of the finest pianists of the 20th century, beloved by jazz and classical audiences alike. It was not as widely known that this man Duke Ellington dubbed “the maharajah of the keyboard” was also a prolific composer. During the course of the year in 2015, 17 jazz greats were gathered by Kelly Peterson, the pianist’s widow, to change this. The result was this unique program and recording, Oscar, With Love. Kauflin will be joined by Benny Green, Robi Botos, Renee Rosnes, Gerald Clayton, Bill Charlap and Dave Young.

Performance Mar. 22

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

HABIB KOITE

Habib Koité and Bassekou Kouyate exemplify responsibility and shared experience associated with the historical, cultural and unifying properties of Malian music. One of Africa’s most recognized musicians, Koité is a modern troubadour with extraordinary appeal because Koité‘s musicianship, wit and wisdom translate across cultures. Hailing from the musically prolific West African nation of Mali, the guitarist and composer has been named the biggest pop star of the region by Rolling Stone. In a collaboration that differs from any in today’s industry, Koité will be performing with fellow Malian Bassekou Kouyate, a master of the olden lute known as the Ngoni.

Two performances Feb. 23

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

BASSEKOU KOUYATE

Habib Koité and Bassekou Kouyate exemplify responsibility and shared experience associated with the historical, cultural, and unifying properties of Malian music. In a collaboration that differs from any in today’s industry, Koité will be performing with fellow Malian Kouyate, a master of the olden lute known as the Ngoni. The effortlessly talented, Grammy-nominated “Ngoni virtuoso Bassekou Kouyate can make notes bend like light rays in the desert heat (Time Out magazine).”

Two performances Feb. 23

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

JOYCE KOZLOFF

Joyce Kozloff was a co-founder of the Pattern and Decoration movement of the 1970s and was also a founding member of the Heresies collective. Her interest in decorative arts, craft and ornamentation provided an alternative to the minimalist “high art” being produced by men during this period. Her latest cartographic works continue to explore the themes of place, gender and power. In her public conversation with Peggy Phelan, director of Stanford Arts Institute, professor of theater and performance studies, and of English, Kozloff will show her decorative work in high art and craft media from the early 70s to the present.

Conversation Jan. 31

Hosted by Stanford Arts Institute

MUSIC

BERNIE KRAUSE

Soundscape ecologist, musician and author Bernie Krause has recorded and archived the sounds of the natural world for more than fifty years. Working at the research sites of Jane Goodall, Biruté Galdikas and Dian Fossey, he identified the acoustic niche hypothesis (ANH) as each organism establishes frequency and/or temporal bandwidth in order to vocalize unimpeded within a given habitat.  Through the prism of ecoacoustics, Krause summarizes the current state of sound from its inception, during the first four billion years of the earth’s formation, through the evolution of biological sound and its profound late-phase impact on culture, to the special human acoustic contributions that have a direct bearing on the planet’s wildlife.

Lecture and performance Jan. 17

Hosted by Continuing Studies

MUSIC

JESSICA LÁ REL

Jessica Lá Rel is a Stanford Institute for Diversity in the Arts alum and recording artist from Chicago by way of the Bay Area. Building from her debut album, War Love, she and producer Tyler Brooks will weave together story, creative practice, and song to dialogue with audiences on emergent themes of personal and political trauma, the spirit, and soul.

Workshop Feb. 1

Hosted by Institute for Diversity in the Arts

MUSIC

THOMAS LAUDERDALE

Featuring a century-spanning repertoire and a mischievous, white-hot wit, the saucy tragi-comedienne chanteuse Meow Meow lights up the stage in a sublimely subversive performance with Pink Martini founder and pianist Thomas Lauderdale.

Two performances Mar. 20

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

GERMAN LOPEZ

The duo formed by timple player Germán López and guitarist Antonio Toledo perfectly fuses the classic music of the Canary Islands. With only two instruments, López and Toledo transport you to the famed archipelago, shining light on Canarian music’s influences from around the world. Expect great originality and an amazing live show, where the improvisations and the interaction of these two musicians make each concert uniquely special.

Two performances Mar. 15

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

HUNG LIU

Hung Liu was born in Changchun, China, in 1948, growing up under the Maoist regime. Initially trained in the Socialist Realist style, Liu studied mural painting as a graduate student at the Central Academy of Fine Art in Beijing, before immigrating to the U.S. in 1984 to attend the University of California, San Diego. She currently lives in Oakland, California, and is a professor emerita at Mills College, where she has taught since 1990. Liu shares her development as an artist over the course of five decades, from China to her current studio practice, as part of the Studio Lecture Series.

Lecture Feb. 21

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History

MUSIC

LEYLA MCCALLA

Deeply influenced by traditional Creole, Cajun and Haitian music as well as by American jazz and folk, Leyla McCalla’s music vibrates with three centuries of history, yet also feels strikingly fresh. She rose to fame during her two years as cellist of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, and in 2013 left to pursue a solo career. Experience McCalla’s soulful style in the intimate Bing Studio cabaret.

Performance Feb. 8

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

JOSIAH MCELHENY

Josiah McElheny’s monumental installation Island Universe, made of brilliantly polished chromed metal, handblown glass and radiating lights, is an attempt to visualize something impossible to see—the big bang. Working at the unexpected intersection of physics, the history of Modernism, and art, McElheny imagines a multiverse scenario, where five separate universes occupy the same space, frozen in their individual moments of expansion. McElheny will be in conversation with David Weinberg, distinguished university professor and chair of the Department of Astronomy at Ohio State University. McElheny collaborated with Weinberg to make the necessary calculations and conceptualize his installation’s forms.

Conversation Mar. 2

Hosted by Cantor Arts Center

MUSIC

BOBBY MCFERRIN

To some people, Bobby McFerrin will always be the guy who sang “Don’t Worry Be Happy,” epitomizing joy in music-making, creativity and spontaneity. At the Bing with the ensemble Gimme5, Bobby will take audiences on a life-changing musical adventure. Experience call-and-response vocals, global rhythms, soaring melodies, lush harmonies, invented language, silence, prayers and laughter.

Performance Jan. 18

Hosted by Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE

MEOW MEOW

Named one of the top performers of the year by The New Yorker, the spectacular crowd-surfing tragi-comedienne has been called “Sensational” (The Times), “diva of the highest order” (New York Post), “The Queen of Chanson” by the Berliner Zeitung, and “a phenomenon” by the Australian press. Featuring a century-spanning repertoire and a mischievous, white-hot wit, this saucy tragi-comedienne chanteuse lights up the stage in a sublimely subversive performance with Pink Martini founder and pianist Thomas Lauderdale.

Two performances Mar. 20

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MULLER CHAMBER CHOIR

As part of its upcoming U.S. tour in 2019, the Müller Chamber Choir will be performing in beautiful Stanford Memorial Church.

Performance Feb. 25

Hosted by Office for Religious Life

MUSIC

NIKOLAS NACKLEY

The Chorale presents Duruflé’s elegant and evocative Requiem in collaboration with soloists Mindy Ella Chu, mezzo soprano, Nikolas Nackley, baritone, the St. Lawrence String Quartet and their visiting guests in the Emerging String Quartet Program the Omer Quartet, and University Organist Robert Huw Morgan. Also on the program is Duruflé’s a cappella choral works, Quatre Motets sur des thèmes grégoriens and Notre Père. This performance is in preparation for recording sessions of this repertoire that will take place the following week.

Performance Feb. 15

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

KIM NALLEY

Two wonderful Bay Area artists—the dynamic duo of vocalist Kim Nalley and pianist Tammy Hall—honor the one and only Aretha Franklin. Awarded “Most Influential African American in the Bay Area” in 2005 and “Best Jazz Group” in 2013, Nalley is already being called “legendary” and a “San Francisco institution.” With an international reputation as one of world’s best jazz & blues vocalists, she has graced concert halls from Moscow to Lincoln Center.

Two performances Mar. 23

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

CHRYSSIE NANOU

Composer Clarence Barlow will give a talk about his multichannel electroacoustic pieces Five Dodecaphonic Pieces, Approximating Pi and Four ISIS Studies. After the talk, these works will be played in a concert in alternation with Chryssie Nanou performing a selection of preludes and fugues for piano from Barlow’s Ludus Ragalis.

Talk and performance Jan. 18

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

CREATIVE WRITING

MAGGIE NELSON

Maggie Nelson is a poet, critic and the author of five books of non-fiction and four collections of poetry. In 2016 she was awarded the MacArthur Genius fellowship. She is on campus for a reading as part of the Lane Lecture Series and a colloquium.

Reading Jan. 28
Colloquium Jan. 29

Hosted by Creative Writing Program

MUSIC

NEW BREED BRASS BAND

New Breed Brass Band lives and breathes the culture of New Orleans, infusing funk, rock, jazz and hip-hop into a custom-made enhancement of second-line brass band tradition. With a founding core of five New Orleans natives, New Breed Brass Band made its street debut as a nine-man unit in November 2013 at the Nine Times Second Line. Since then, they have showcased their originality opening for such diverse bands as The Fray, Red Baraat, Dr. John, The Waterboys and Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue.

Two performances Jan. 19

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ODEYA NINI

Evolving over the last seven years, A Solo Voice, composed and performed by Odeya Nini, is an investigation of resonance, extended vocal techniques, performance and pure expression, exploring the relationship between mind and body and the various landscapes it can yield. The work is a series of malleable compositions and improvisations that include field recordings and theatrical elements, aiming to dissociate the voice from its traditional attributes and create a new logic of song that is not only heard but seen through movement and action.

Performance Jan. 24

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

MUSIC

OMER QUARTET

The Chorale presents Duruflé’s elegant and evocative Requiem in collaboration with soloists Mindy Ella Chu, mezzo soprano; Nikolas Nackley, baritone; the St. Lawrence String Quartet and visiting guest in the Emerging String Quartet Program the Omer Quartet; and University Organist Robert Huw Morgan. Also on the program is Duruflé’s a cappella choral works, Quatre Motets sur des thèmes grégoriens and Notre Père. This performance is in preparation for recording sessions of this repertoire that will take place the following week.

Performance Feb. 15

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

ERIC OWENS

Acclaimed artists Lawrence Brownlee, tenor, and Eric Owens, bass-baritone, share the stage in arias and duets by Bizet, Mozart and Verdi alongside American songs and spirituals. Brownlee, an exemplary bel canto artist, sang at the Met as Almaviva in The Barber of Seville and Tonio in The Daughter of the Regiment. Owens won the prestigious Metropolitan Opera Auditions in 1996 and went on to create the role of General Leslie Groves in John Adams’ Dr. Atomic at San Francisco Opera and sang the role of Alberich in the Met’s new production of Wagner’s Ring cycle.

Performance Feb. 15

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

SHEILA PEPE

Visual artist Sheila Pepe is known for her large-scale, ephemeral installations and sculptures made from domestic and industrial materials. She is the Holt Visiting Artist for AY19 at Stanford, and is in residence in the Department of Art and Art History for the winter term teaching the course Sculpture: Votives, Totems, and Sanctuaries. She will give a public lecture on her recent mid-career survey Hot Mess Formalism.

Winter teaching residency
Lecture Mar. 7

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History

 

MUSIC

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA

For the first time, Philharmonia brings PBO SESSIONS to Stanford with a program that showcases the synergies between old and new music. Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and performer Caroline Shaw presents several of her acclaimed compositions with Philharmonia Baroque Chamber Players, alongside works by Baroque and classical composers that directly influenced her writing. Countertenor Daniel Moody will perform music old and new and composers Bálint Karosi and Grace-Evangeline Mason will contribute their new works as well in a historically informed program that will captivate the ears of early music enthusiasts as much as those who crave contemporary cadence. PBO’s Nicholas McGegan and star mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter will join in discussion of new music for old instruments.

Performance Mar. 7

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA, LONDON

Esa-Pekka Salonen leads the Philharmonia Orchestra, London in celebrating immigrants old and new. From collaborators Jimmy Lopez and Nilo Cruz comes Dreamers, featuring soprano Ana Mariá Martinez. Co-commissioned with Cal Performances, the piece explores the experience of undocumented individuals brought to this country as children—and what it means for cities to provide sanctuary. From the Russian-born Igor Stravinsky comes The Firebird, created in 1910 for the Ballets Russes.

Performance Mar. 18

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

QUEBE SISTERS

When the Quebe Sisters from Texas take a stage, and the triple-threat fiddle champions start playing and singing in multi-part close harmony, audiences are usually transfixed, then blown away. It’s partly because the trio’s vocal and instrumental performances are authentic all-Americana, all the time, respectful of the artists that inspired them the most. And whether the Quebes (rhymes with “maybe”) are decked out in denims and boots or fashionably dressed to the nines in makeup, skirts and heels, the fresh-faced, clean-cut sisters, all in their 20s, look as good as they sound.

Performance Mar. 21

Hosted by Stanford Live

Quebe Sisters Performing Band

PERFORMANCE

QUOTE UNQUOTE COLLECTIVE

Mouthpiece follows one woman, for one day, in the wake of her mother’s death, as she tries to find her voice. Interweaving a cappella harmony, dissonance, text and physicality, two performers express the inner conflict that exists within one modern woman’s head: the push and the pull, the past and the present, progress and regression. Both a heart-wrenching and humorous journey into the female psyche, Mouthpiece has been hailed for its engrossing and unforgettable performance.

Performances Jan. 31-Feb. 2

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MATT RAY

Jazz pianist, vocalist and arranger Matt Ray takes us through an evening highlighting the music of one of the essential architects of the classic American Songbook. Along with a top-notch local band Ray warms up the room with personal favorites from Hoagy Carmichael’s vast catalog, which includes “Stardust,” “The Nearness of You” and “Georgia on My Mind.” A veteran of the New York jazz and cabaret scenes and a co-winner of the 2017 Kennedy Prize for Drama, Ray’s superb piano playing, smooth vocals and inventive song arrangements bring to life the music of this great American songwriter.

Performances Mar. 8 & 9

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

JOSHUA REDMAN

Mohr Visiting Artist Joshua Redman is one of the most acclaimed and charismatic jazz artists to have emerged in the 1990s. Born in Berkeley, California, he is the son of legendary saxophonist Dewey Redman and dancer Renee Shedroff. In 1991, Redman graduated from Harvard College summa cum laude and had already been accepted by Yale Law School, but he deferred entrance for what he believed was only going to be one year. Moving to New York, he immediately found himself immersed in that city’s burgeoning jazz scene. Since then, Redman has worked and played with a vast array of jazz luminaries, released 21 albums for Warner and Nonesuch, been nominated for a Grammy six times, and garnered top honors in critics and readers polls of DownBeat, Jazz Times, The Village Voice, and Rolling Stone.

Winter teaching residency

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

RENEE ROSNES

Jazz pianist and composer Renee Rosnes is one of several musicians performing in A Tribute to the Late Oscar Peterson, hosted by Peterson’s daughter Céline. Oscar Peterson was one of the finest pianists of the 20th century. beloved by jazz and classical audiences alike. It was not as widely known that this man Duke Ellington dubbed “the maharajah of the keyboard” was also a prolific composer. During the course of the year in 2015, 17 jazz greats were gathered by Kelly Peterson, the pianist’s widow, to change this. The result was this unique program and recording, Oscar, With Love. Rosnes will be joined by Benny Green, Robi Botos, Justin Kauflin, Gerald Clayton, Bill Charlap and Dave Young.

Performance Mar. 22

Hosted by Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE

RICHARD SCHECHNER

Richard Schechner comes to Stanford for the 2019 Carl Weber Memorial Lecture. This Event is Free + Open to the Public. Exact Time TBA.

Richard Schechner, one of the founders of Performance Studies, is a performance theorist, theater director, author, editor and educator. He combines his work in performance theory with innovative approaches to the broad spectrum of performance including theatre, play, ritual, dance, music, popular entertainments, sports, politics and performance in everyday life in order to understand performative behavior not just as an object of study, but also as an active artistic-intellectual practice. He founded The Performance Group and East Coast Artists. He delivers the 2019 Carl Weber Memorial Lecture.

Lecture Mar. 7

Hosted by Department of Theater & Performance Studies

VISUAL ART

DANA SCHUTZ

Visual artist Dana Schutz lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Her paintings depict darkly humorous narratives, hypothetical situations and impossible physical feats, such as swimming while smoking and crying or a manically refracted self- exam. Vibrant and tactile, Schutz’s oddly compelling images simultaneously engage the unique capabilities of the medium while conjuring a world both urgent and harrowing. She will be in conversation with Hamza Walker, director of LAXART.

Conversation Mar. 4

Hosted by Office of the Vice President for the Arts

VISUAL ART

DREAD SCOTT

Dread Scott makes revolutionary art to propel history forward. His work is exhibited across the U.S. and internationally. In 1989, his art became the center of national controversy over its transgressive use of the American flag, while he was a student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Scott became part of a landmark Supreme Court case when he and others defied the law by burning flags on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. He is participating in a symposium on the art of Michael Richards titled Flight, Diaspora, Identity, & Afterlife.

Symposium Feb. 8

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History

VISUAL ART

CAMILLE SEAMAN

Camille Seaman is a photographer whose work focuses on the fragile environments, extreme weather, and stark beauty of the natural world—from the deep grays of supercell storm clouds to the shocking blue of icebergs. She strongly believes in capturing photographs that articulate that humans are not separate from nature. Her work has been featured globally in publications, including National GeographicTime, and The New York Times. She has received many awards, including a National Geographic Award and the Critical Mass Top Monograph Award.

Lecture Feb. 28

Hosted by Continuing Studies

MUSIC

SENYAWA

Fusing folk, doom metal and improv noise, the Indonesian duo Senyawa is unlike any other band. Wukir Suryadi plays the bambuwukir, an instrument he designed. It’s an amplified zither, wild in nature and fashioned out of bamboo, and does the work of many instruments, from plucky guitar to weighty percussion. As for Rully Shabara, he sings, he shrieks, he growls, and he evokes the boundaries of what it means to be human.

Performance Jan. 26

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

BENJAMIN SIMON

Toward the end of his all-too-brief life, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote some of his greatest works; his final symphonies and operas are well-beloved masterpieces. There are lesser-known masterpieces as well, including the six-movement Divertimento Trio, which transcends its genre with some of Mozart’s most beautiful and dramatic chamber music writing. Continuing Studies presents a guided musical tour of this amazing work, followed by a complete performance by three of the Bay Area’s outstanding chamber musicians: Kay Stern, violin; Benjamin Simon, viola; and Hannah Addario-Berry, cello. Simon is a former member of the Stanford String Quartet. He has been teaching Continuing Studies music courses since 1996 and has also organized popular winter celebrations of Mozart, Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Schubert and Bernstein.

Performance Feb. 9

Hosted by Continuing Studies

CREATIVE WRITING

ZADIE SMITH

Since she burst spectacularly into view with her debut novel almost two decades ago, Zadie Smith has established herself not just as one of the world’s preeminent fiction writers and a brilliant essayist. She contributes regularly to the New Yorker and the New York Review of Books on a range of subjects, and each piece of hers is a literary event in its own right. Her acclaimed first novel, White Teeth (2000), is a vibrant portrait of contemporary multicultural London, told through the stories of three ethnically diverse families. Smith delivers the Presidential Lecture in the Humanities and Arts.

Lecture Mar. 7

Hosted by Humanities Center

MUSIC

LAETITIA SONAMI

Laetitia Sonami, composer, sound installation artist and technologist, discusses her 40-year musical trajectories and encounters. Sonami studied with Eliane Radigue, Robert Ashley, David Behrman and Joel Chadabe. She moved from France to the U.S. in the late 1970s to pursue her interest in electronic music, away from the more conservative French institutions of the time.

Lecture Jan. 22

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

FILM

WES STUDI

From small-town Oklahoma native to internationally acclaimed actor and musician, Wes Studi credits his passion and multi-faceted background for his powerful character portrayals that forever changed a Hollywood stereotype. Drawing from his rich life experience, Studi has moved audiences with unforgettable performances in Dances with WolvesThe Last of the Mohicans, Geronimo: An American Legend, and Heat, as well as James Cameron’s Avatar and Paul Weitz’s Being Flynn. Most recently Studi starred opposite Christian Bale in the critically acclaimed Hostiles, directed by Scott Cooper, with whom he is collaborating on another project this fall. Breaking new ground, Studi has brought fully developed Native American characters to the screen, and then took his craft a step further, highlighting the success of Native Americans in non-traditional roles. He will be in conversation with Alexander Nemerov, Carl and Marilyn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities and chair of the Department of Art and Art History.

Conversation Jan. 29

Hosted by Department of Art & Art History

MUSIC

ALICIA SVIGALS

Alicia Svigals is the world’s foremost klezmer fiddler and a founder of the Grammy-winning Klezmatics. Together, Svigals and Uli Geissendoerfer perform the melodies rescued by Jewish scholar Moshe Beregovski, in settings that both recreate the lost world which gave them birth and re-contextualize them for the 21st century.

Performance Feb. 19

Hosted by Taube Center for Jewish Studies

DANCE

AMARA TABOR-SMITH

Amara Tabor-Smith is an Oakland-based choreographer/performance maker who describes her work as Afro Futurist Conjure Art. Her dance-making practice utilizes Yoruba spiritual ritual to address issues of social and environmental justice, race, gender identity and belonging. She is a 2018 USA Artist Fellow, a 2017 UBW Choreographic Center Fellow, and is a 2016 recipient of the Creative Capital Grant along with collaborator Ellen Sebastian Chang. Tabor-Smith is the artistic director of Deep Waters Dance Theater and was the co-artistic director of Headmistress with Sherwood Chen. She is speaking at the Clayman Institute’s Winter Artist’s Salon. In her talk, she will share excerpts from her dance theater works and discuss why she calls her performance work “Conjure Art.”

Talk Feb. 5

Hosted by Clayman Institute for Gender Research, Stanford Humanities Center, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

MUSIC

TAFELMUSIK BAROQUE ORCHESTRA

Founded in 1979, Tafelmusik, the acclaimed Toronto-based Baroque orchestra and chamber choir, is Canada’s most-toured musical group. In Tales of Two Cities, Tafelmusik takes the audience along on a tour of two coffeehouses in 18th-century Leipzig and Damascus, when both cities were on ancient trading routes. Conceived by Alison Mackay, the tales embrace works by Bach, Telemann, and Handel, as well as classical Arabic music, in a stunning cross-cultural caffeination of music, images, and words.

Performance Mar. 8

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

TAK

TAK is a quintet that delivers energetic and virtuosic performances of contemporary classical music. Dedicated to the commissioning of new works and direct collaboration with composers and other artists, TAK promotes ambitious programming at the highest level, fostering engagement both within the contemporary music community and the artistic community at large. The ensemble performs work by Hassan Estakhrian, Julie Herndon, Doug McCausland, Nick Virzi and Julie Zhu.

Performance Feb. 9

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

BRIAN THORSETT

Brian Thorsett, tenor, is excelling in opera, oratorio and recital across the world. Since taking to the operatic stage, he has been seen and heard in over 100 diverse operatic roles, ranging from Monteverdi to Britten, back to Rameau and ahead again to works composed specifically for his talents. He and Laura Dahl, faculty pianist, perform an intimate recital as part of the long-running Shenson Recital Series.

Performance Mar. 10

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

ANTONIO TOLEDO

The duo formed by timple player Germán López and guitarist Antonio Toledo perfectly fuses the classic music of the Canary Islands. With only two instruments, López and Toledo will transport you to the famed archipelago, shining light on Canarian music’s influences from around the world. Expect great originality and an amazing live show, where the improvisations and the interaction of these two musicians make each concert uniquely special.

Two performances Mar. 15

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

KERRY TRIBE

Kerry Tribe is a Los Angeles-based video and performance artist. Her performance piece, Critical Mass (2010), was staged at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2010, the Tate Modern in 2012 and several other museums. Tribe’s most recent film, Standardized Patient (2017), premiered at SFMOMA in fall 2017. She describes her work as “documentary adjacent.” Tribe is a 2018-19 visiting artist with the Stanford Presidential Residencies on the Future of the Arts program.

Yearlong residency

Hosted by Stanford Arts Institute

MUSIC

UNIVERSITY OF THE PACIFIC WIND ENSEMBLE

The Stanford Wind Symphony and the University of the Pacific Wind Ensemble present a joint concert directed by Russell Gavin.

Performance Mar. 10

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

RAY VEGA

The acclaimed Stanford Afro-Latin Jazz Ensemble will take important repertoire from American jazz and re-arrange it with a “Latin tinge” to illustrate the key connections between the music of North and Latin America. Special guest Ray Vega, trumpet, joins the ensemble for this program.

Performance Mar. 3

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

ANNE SOFIE VON OTTER

Megastar mezzo-soprano Anne Sofie von Otter plies her singular burnished-silver style to an eclectic program of old and new, sacred and secular. Handel duets with rising countertenor Daniel Moody harken back to von Otter’s early breakthrough Baroque performances, while Arvo Pärt’s otherworldly devotionals and Caroline Shaw’s soulful PBO commissions channel her crossover versatility. Nic McGegan steers this voyage through far-ranging soundscapes.

Performance Mar. 6

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

WOODEN FISH ENSEMBLE

San Francisco-based Wooden Fish Ensemble presents concerts of music and musicians from a variety of cultural and national backgrounds. The ensemble performs works by Hyo-shin Na along with Japanese and Korean folk songs.

Performance Feb. 9

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

DAVE YOUNG

Jazz bassist Dave Young is one of several musicians performing in A Tribute to the Late Oscar Peterson, hosted by Peterson’s daughter Céline. Oscar Peterson was one of the finest pianists of the 20th century, beloved by jazz and classical audiences alike. It was not as widely known that this man Duke Ellington dubbed “the maharajah of the keyboard” was also a prolific composer. During the course of the year in 2015, 17 jazz greats were gathered by Kelly Peterson, the pianist’s widow, to change this. The result was this unique program and recording, Oscar, With Love. Young will be joined by Benny Green, Robi Botos, Justin Kauflin, Gerald Clayton, Bill Charlap and Renee Rosnes.

Performance Mar. 22

Hosted by Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE

JENNY ZIGRINO

With the sweetness of the Midwest and the razor-sharp wit of the East Coast, Jenny Zigrino is a comedian who packs a punch of truly original humor. She’s charmed audiences across the country with her wit, keen observations, embarrassing anecdotes and brilliant honesty for a compelling performance you can’t ignore. She made her late night debut on Conan O’Brien and was a recent guest on the hit shows @Midnight and Adam DeVine’s House Party Season 3 on Comedy Central. She’s been featured on TBS, Oxygen, TruTV, MTV Fox, and IFC.

Two performances Feb. 21

Hosted by Stanford Live