sustainability

Could kelp help relieve ocean acidification?

A new analysis of California’s Monterey Bay evaluates kelp’s potential to reduce ocean acidification, the harmful fallout from climate change on marine ecosystems and the food they produce for human populations.

Predicting urban water needs with Zillow and census data

New Stanford research uses Zillow and census data combined with machine learning to identify residential water consumption based on housing characteristics. The approach could help cities better understand water use and design water-efficient communities.

Cape Town’s ‘Day Zero’ drought a sign of things to come

Using new high-resolution simulations, researchers conclude that climate change made the Cape Town ‘Day Zero’ drought five to six times more likely and suggest extreme drought events could become common in southwestern South Africa by the end of the 21st century.

Belize’s economy gets a boost from nature

Drawing on research by Stanford scientists, countries like Belize are finding new ways to supplement their devastated ecotourism-driven economies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Why laughing gas is a growing climate problem

Stanford scientist Rob Jackson explains why emissions of nitrous oxide, also known as “laughing gas,” are rising faster than expected and what it will take to reverse the trend.

Stanford continues working toward a more sustainable and resilient future

In an annual report, Stanford’s Office of Sustainability highlights the ways the university reduced its collective resource footprint and demonstrated sustainability in action in 2019-20, and discusses the key themes that will guide campus sustainability efforts this year.

Indigenous conservationist wins 2020 Bright Award

Maria Azhunova, winner of the 2020 Bright Award, supports the intergenerational transfer of traditional knowledge and biocultural approaches to nature conservation through her work at the Baikal Buryat Center for Indigenous Cultures.