Space

Stanford Earth —

Fact or fiction? The science of “Star Wars“

How did those planets form? Could they exist in our universe? Could “Star Wars” really happen? Stanford Earth experts on planetary formation, processes and habitability discuss the science behind the fictional saga.

Introductory seminar shoots for the stars

A freshman course takes students through the process of designing a space mission, ending with a presentation of their own mission designs to NASA scientists.

Walter Vincenti, interdisciplinary engineer, dead at 102

Vincenti’s research laid the foundation for many advances in aeronautics, including supersonic flight and spacecraft reentry. He also co-founded the interdisciplinary Stanford Program in Science, Technology and Society.

A different kind of gravitational wave detector

Stanford physicists are helping develop a device that turns frozen, falling atoms into an exquisitely sensitive gravitational wave detector that could provide a new glimpse into the most energetic and oldest events in the universe.

A radio that searches for dark matter

An “out there” theory inspired the development of the Dark Matter Radio, a device that could explain the mysterious matter that makes up 85 percent of the mass of our universe.

Scientist models exoplanet’s atmosphere

New research using data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has provided a rare glimpse at the surface of a rocky planet outside our solar system.

Being an intern in the Apollo program

From chasing toxic clouds to developing rocket fuels for Mars, Brian Cantwell shares stories of his time working on space exploration technologies – starting with an internship with the Apollo program.

School of Humanities and Sciences —

NASA’s Fermi mission reveals record-setting gamma-ray bursts

Stanford has played a leading role in compiling Fermi’s gamma-ray bursts catalogs ever since the space observatory launched nearly 11 years ago. More than 120 authors contributed to the effort.