Sociology

How do people respond to wildfire smoke?

Interviews with Northern California residents reveal that social norms and social support are essential for understanding protective health behaviors during wildfire smoke events – information that could be leveraged to improve public health outcomes.

The long and winding road to the 2020 Tokyo Games

While public support in Japan has been lackluster for the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games, the mood may change once the games start – provided no major public health incidents and other unfortunate accidents occur, says Stanford sociologist Kiyoteru Tsutsui.

Study identifies another explanation for the ‘marriage premium’

Stanford sociologist Florencia Torche uncovers empirical evidence to show that the benefits of marriage to child development derive not just from individual characteristics of spouses and their circumstances. How society views marriage as an institution matters too.

The hidden side of pandemic life

Over the past year, the American Voices Project has documented how Americans are experiencing the COVID-19 crisis – from incapacitating anxiety to extraordinary fortitude even in the most harrowing circumstances.

How diseases and history are intertwined

In an introductory seminar course, students explored how vector-borne diseases have influenced history and found that they often most heavily impacted marginalized communities.

War never really ended in Asia

As the 75th anniversary nears of World War II formally ending in Asia, Stanford sociologist Gi-Wook Shin discusses how the conflict was never fully resolved in the region and the problems that still persist today.

Who moves forward in the hiring process?

People whose employment histories include part-time, temporary help agency or mismatched work can face challenges during the hiring process, according to new research by Stanford sociologist David Pedulla.