Sociology

War never really ended in Asia

As the 75th anniversary nears of World War II formally ending in Asia, Stanford sociologist Gi-Wook Shin discusses how the conflict was never fully resolved in the region and the problems that still persist today.

Who moves forward in the hiring process?

People whose employment histories include part-time, temporary help agency or mismatched work can face challenges during the hiring process, according to new research by Stanford sociologist David Pedulla.

A more holistic way to measure economic fallout from earthquakes

Officials know how to account for deaths, injuries and property damages after the shaking stops, but a new study, based on a hypothetical 7.2 magnitude quake near San Francisco, describes the first way to estimate the far greater financial fallout that such a disaster would have, especially on the poor.

How immigration in Seattle is driving urban change

A Stanford sociologist found that recent Asian immigrants moving to neighborhoods with more Asians explains the lack of redevelopment in these areas and contributes to the gentrification of areas with a higher African American population.

Online dating is the most popular way couples meet

Matchmaking is now done primarily by algorithms, according to new research from Stanford sociologist Michael Rosenfeld. His new study shows that most heterosexual couples today meet online.

Analyzing the tweets of Republicans and Democrats

New research by Dora Demszky and colleagues examined how Republicans and Democrats express themselves online in an attempt to understand how polarization of beliefs occurs on social media.

How toxic economic trends have impacted millennials

A new report by Stanford scholars lays out the problems U.S. millennials face as a result of decades-long rising inequality. Problems they experience include rising mortality rates and increased poverty among those without college degrees.