Sociology

How immigration in Seattle is driving urban change

A Stanford sociologist found that recent Asian immigrants moving to neighborhoods with more Asians explains the lack of redevelopment in these areas and contributes to the gentrification of areas with a higher African American population.

Online dating is the most popular way couples meet

Matchmaking is now done primarily by algorithms, according to new research from Stanford sociologist Michael Rosenfeld. His new study shows that most heterosexual couples today meet online.

Analyzing the tweets of Republicans and Democrats

New research by Dora Demszky and colleagues examined how Republicans and Democrats express themselves online in an attempt to understand how polarization of beliefs occurs on social media.

How toxic economic trends have impacted millennials

A new report by Stanford scholars lays out the problems U.S. millennials face as a result of decades-long rising inequality. Problems they experience include rising mortality rates and increased poverty among those without college degrees.

Strategies to secure American elections

Stanford scholars outline a detailed strategy for how to protect the integrity of American elections – including recommendations such as requiring a paper trail of every vote cast and publishing information about a campaign’s connections with foreign nationals.

In political messages, values matter more than policy

When progressive candidates talk about how their policies are aligned with values commonly associated with conservative ideals – as opposed to liberal ones – they receive greater support from conservatives and moderates.

How gangs use social media

Stanford sociologist Forrest Stuart examines how gang-associated youth on Chicago’s South Side use social media to challenge rivals. He finds that, contrary to common belief, most of these confrontations do not escalate to offline violence and, in some instances, deter it.

How violent protest can backfire

When a protest group with strong public support turns violent, people may perceive them as less reasonable. In turn, this leads people to identify with them less, and ultimately become less supportive, according to a new study by Stanford sociologist Robb Willer.