robotics

Perseverance will seek signs of life on Mars

According to Stanford University Mars experts, NASA’s latest Martian rover will drive a wave of exciting discoveries when it lands on the Red Planet – and possibly alter scientists’ understanding of the blue one it launches from.

Squishy, shape-changing bot roams untethered

A new type of robot combines traditional and soft robotics, making it safe but sturdy. Once inflated, it can change shape and move without being attached to a source of energy or air.

Autonomous DeLorean drives sideways to move forward

Engineers in Stanford’s Dynamic Design Lab are teaching a driverless DeLorean to steer with the agility and precision of a human driver with a goal of improving how autonomous cars handle in hazardous conditions.

New algorithm trains AI to avoid bad behaviors

Robots, self-driving cars and other intelligent machines could become better-behaved thanks to a new way to help machine learning designers build AI applications with safeguards against specific, undesirable outcomes such as racial and gender bias.

How can robots land like birds?

Birds can perch on a wide variety of surfaces, thick or thin, rough or slick. But can they find stable footing if a branch is covered in Teflon? In the interest of making better robots, Stanford researchers found out.

Seeing moving objects around corners

By analyzing single particles of light, this camera system can reconstruct room-size scenes and moving objects that are hidden around a corner. This work could someday help autonomous cars and robots see better.

Inexpensive chip-size satellites orbit Earth

A swarm of 105 tiny satellites the size of computer chips, costing under $100 each, recently launched into Earth’s orbit. Stanford scientist Zac Manchester, who dreamed up the ChipSats, said they pave the way for cheaper and easier space exploration.