robotics

Becoming an exoskeleton expert

New research shows that the benefits people could reap from exoskeletons rely heavily on having time to train with the device.

‘Gecko gripper’ tested aboard ISS

A robotic gripper, developed by Stanford engineers, was tested aboard the ISS. Equipped with grippy but not sticky gecko-inspired adhesives, the gripper could be particularly well-suited for tasks such as collecting debris and servicing satellites.

Ankle exoskeleton enables faster walking

In lab tests, researchers found that an optimized ankle exoskeleton system increased participants’ walking speed by about 40 percent compared with their regular speed. The researchers hope someday to help restore walking speed in older adults.

Perseverance will seek signs of life on Mars

According to Stanford University Mars experts, NASA’s latest Martian rover will drive a wave of exciting discoveries when it lands on the Red Planet – and possibly alter scientists’ understanding of the blue one it launches from.

Squishy, shape-changing bot roams untethered

A new type of robot combines traditional and soft robotics, making it safe but sturdy. Once inflated, it can change shape and move without being attached to a source of energy or air.

Autonomous DeLorean drives sideways to move forward

Engineers in Stanford’s Dynamic Design Lab are teaching a driverless DeLorean to steer with the agility and precision of a human driver with a goal of improving how autonomous cars handle in hazardous conditions.

New algorithm trains AI to avoid bad behaviors

Robots, self-driving cars and other intelligent machines could become better-behaved thanks to a new way to help machine learning designers build AI applications with safeguards against specific, undesirable outcomes such as racial and gender bias.