history

Returning home during Age of Mass Migration

New research by Stanford economist Ran Abramitzky studies Norwegian immigrants to the U.S. during the late 19th and early 20th centuries who chose to return to Europe.

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies —

Why we should start worrying about nuclear fallout

In a Q&A, nuclear security scholar Gabrielle Hecht discusses the consequences of nuclear war, what radioactive contamination would look like today and what damage nuclear activities have already caused.

Sophomore examines how Italy became democracy after WWII

Italy, a previously fascist country, became a democracy shortly after World War II ended. That transition and the country’s 1948 election are still sources of debate, and led Stanford undergraduate Anatole Schneider to search for answers.

Stanford Teaching Festival course examines WWI

A new professional development course at Stanford for middle and high school teachers highlights the importance of teaching the history of the First World War in a global context.

Ancient Rome and its influence on USA examined in new class

Stanford Humanities Institute offered a new course to its latest cohort of high school students on the rise and fall of ancient Rome and its legacies in order to underline the importance of studying the classical world.

Stanford scholar examines international institutions

Rising nations such as China and India are seeking to play a greater role in the world’s most influential international organizations. How these organizations accommodate rising powers is at the heart of Stanford Professor Phillip Lipscy’s new book.