history

Clayborne Carson: Looking back at a legacy

Stanford historian Clayborne Carson reflects on a career dedicated to studying and preserving the legacy of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

War never really ended in Asia

As the 75th anniversary nears of World War II formally ending in Asia, Stanford sociologist Gi-Wook Shin discusses how the conflict was never fully resolved in the region and the problems that still persist today.

History Professor Emeritus Mark Mancall dies

Mancall shaped the lives of generations of students through his research, teaching, mentorship and transformative commitment to undergraduate life and education.

Left out of the vote

As the centennial of the 19th Amendment approaches, Stanford scholar Rabia Belt wants to acknowledge a history often overlooked in discourse about the franchise: people living with disabilities.

Why Confederate monuments are coming down now

As Confederate monuments and memorials are toppled across the United States, Stanford historian James T. Campbell says it is important to think historically not only about the past but also about our own time and what future generations might say about us.

How the meaning of the Declaration of Independence changed over time

When the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, it was a call for the right to statehood rather than individual liberties, says Stanford historian Jack Rakove. Only after the American Revolution did people interpret it as a promise for individual equality.