Geology

Geomathematician John W. Harbaugh dies at 92

Harbaugh, former chair of the Department of Geology, was a foundational figure in mathematical geology and active in campus leadership. He died July 28 at age 92.

Vintage film reveals Antarctic glacier melting

Newly available archival film has revealed the eastern ice shelf of Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is melting faster than previous estimates, suggesting the shelf may collapse sooner than expected.

Ancient die-off greater than dinosaur extinction

When significant oxygen entered the atmosphere, ancient life multiplied. But after a few hundred million years, Earth’s oxygen plummeted, resulting in a die-off likely greater than the extinction of the dinosaurs.

Scientist models exoplanet’s atmosphere

New research using data from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has provided a rare glimpse at the surface of a rocky planet outside our solar system.

Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences —

How the weathering of rocks cooled the Earth

Earth’s climate entered a long phase of cooling 15 million years ago, resulting in an ice age. A team of researchers has now found new indications as to what initiated this cooling and kept it going.

Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences —

Atmospheric rivers getting warmer along U.S. West Coast

New research shows that atmospheric rivers – plumes of moisture that deliver much of the west’s precipitation – have gotten warmer over the past 36 years.

Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences —

Modeling Earth’s chemistry: Making the invisible visible

Researchers use computer modeling to better understand the chemical reactions in Earth’s subsurface that affect water supplies, energy waste storage, climate change and more.

Solving geothermal energy’s earthquake problem

A geothermal energy project triggered a damaging earthquake in 2017 in South Korea. A new analysis suggests flaws in some of the most common ways of trying to minimize the risk of such quakes when harnessing Earth’s heat for energy.

Stanford School of Engineering —

Can a drone reveal the murky secrets of San Francisco Bay?

Measurements of suspended sediment concentrations reveal a lot about the health of a waterway, but information has been difficult to obtain. A new approach uses a drone to take high-resolution photos to reveal turbidity.