Energy

What does the future of energy look like?

Stanford experts agree that the world needs to be less reliant on fossil fuels for energy. Getting there will remake the world’s largest economic sector – energy – into one that is more sustainable, secure and affordable for everyone.

New plant tests energy-saving way to treat wastewater

A new wastewater treatment plant under construction in Redwood Shores will be the largest to test Stanford-developed technology that significantly reduces the cost of cleaning water. The key: bacteria that eschew oxygen while producing burnable methane.

New water-based battery offers large-scale energy storage

Stanford scientists have developed a manganese-hydrogen battery that could fill a missing piece in the nation’s energy puzzle by storing wind and solar energy for when it is needed, lessening the need to burn carbon-emitting fossil fuels.

Students explore the complexities of creating energy

Students who joined the Sophomore College course Water and Power in the Pacific Northwest: The Columbia River traveled to the Columbia River valley to understand the interplay between water, energy and human populations.

New credits make carbon capture profitable

With recent tax credits and other policies, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it underground is not only possible but profitable for U.S. biofuel refineries.

California contemplates expansion of offshore oil drilling

If federal plans move forward, most U.S. coastal waters would be open to offshore oil drilling. Stanford Professors Deborah Sivas and Alexandria Boehm look at related legal and marine issues from the perspective of the California coastline, which has been protected from new drilling since 1969.

New method for waking up devices

A device that’s turned off doesn’t suck battery life, but it also doesn’t work. Now a low-power system that’s always on the alert can turn devices on when they are needed, saving energy in the networked internet of things.

Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energy

Researchers propose three separate ways to avoid blackouts if the world transitions all its energy to electricity or direct heat and provides the energy with 100 percent wind, water and sunlight. The solutions reduce energy requirements, health damage and climate damage.

New map profiles induced earthquake risk

A map created by Stanford geophysicists can help predict which parts of West Texas and New Mexico may be at risk of fracking-induced earthquakes. The map could guide oil discovery efforts in the region.