computing

Fine-tuning the color of light

A new sort of optical device allows engineers to change the frequencies of individual photons, putting new capabilities in engineers’ hands.

Can extreme melt destabilize ice sheets?

Researchers have deciphered a trove of data that shows one season of extreme melt can reduce the Greenland Ice Sheet’s capacity to store future meltwater – and increase the likelihood of future melt raising sea levels.

Jeffrey Ullman receives ACM Turing Award

Ullman shares the prize with long-time collaborator Alfred Aho of Columbia University. They are recognized for their influential work on compilers and algorithms, including their co-authorship of widely popular textbooks on these topics.

Famous Stanford coding course free online

Stanford tries a new model for online learning. A free version of a popular intro to coding course is being offered for the second time this spring. The secret ingredient was the largest group of teachers for a single class. You can teach too! Applications are open.

Assessing regulatory fairness through machine learning

Applying machine learning to a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiative reveals how key design elements determine what communities bear the burden of pollution. The approach could help ensure fairness and accountability in machine learning used by government regulators.

Stanford Today —

New StageCast tool facilitates online performances

Stanford theater directors, computer scientists and electrical engineers created a new tool to help performers who are located in different spaces come together in online performances.

Hybrid chips can run AI on battery-powered devices

In traditional electronics, separate chips process and store data, wasting energy as they toss data back and forth over what engineers call a “memory wall.” New algorithms combine several energy-efficient hybrid chips to create the illusion of one mega–AI chip.

Undersea origins of Earth’s mysterious Love waves

Supercomputer simulations of planetary-scale interactions show how ocean storms and the structure of Earth’s upper layers together generate much of the world’s seismic waves. Decoding the faint but ubiquitous vibrations known as Love waves could yield insights about Earth’s storm history, changing climate and interior.

Computer model can predict COVID-19’s spread

A study of how 98 million Americans move around each day suggests that most infections occur at “superspreader” sites that put people in contact for long periods, and details how mobility patterns help drive higher infection rates among minority and low-income populations.