Climate change

Interactive map shows nature’s contributions to people

The researchers set out to understand where nature contributes the most to people and how many people may be affected by future changes. By 2050, up to 5 billion people could be at higher risk of water pollution, coastal storms and underpollinated crops.

Archaea hold clues to ancient ocean temperatures

Scientists at Stanford have identified molecules that tough microbes use to survive in warming waters, opening a window more broadly into studying conditions in ancient seas.

Ensuring coastal resilience for the Bahamas

A new Stanford-led study provides information on how to invest in natural coastal ecosystems that the Bahamian government, community leaders and development banks are applying in post-disaster recovery and future storm preparation in the Bahamas.

Stanford Law School —

Q&A: Proposed rollback of key climate change regulations

Law Professor Deborah Sivas explains how a rollback of several key environmental regulations, including fuel efficiency/vehicle pollution standards and energy-efficient light bulbs, might impact climate change.

Seeking solutions to climate change

Stanford faculty study the causes and effects of climate change, and investigate new ways of reducing carbon emissions through green energy technologies and policy decisions.

New ways to find natural gas leaks quickly

Finding natural gas leaks more quickly and at lower cost could reduce methane emissions. Ten promising technologies mounted on drones, trucks and airplanes were tested last year. The results are in.

Satellites reveal peatland fire susceptibility

Fires in Southeast Asian peatlands release huge amounts of carbon, along with deadly smoke. Now, new satellite measurements of soil moisture may offer a promising approach to reducing those fires and their widespread haze.

Vintage film reveals Antarctic glacier melting

Newly available archival film has revealed the eastern ice shelf of Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is melting faster than previous estimates, suggesting the shelf may collapse sooner than expected.