Climate change

Hopeful signs despite growing carbon emissions

An international research team reports that the increase in global carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels has resumed after a 3-year respite and may increase again next year. Despite the findings, improved energy efficiency and a booming renewables market provide signs of hope.

Ocean monuments face possible loss of protection

Federal regulators have indicated they may open some marine national monuments to commercial fishing. Researchers who have studied these and adjacent areas discuss their value and the potential impacts of a change in protected status.

New techniques for removing carbon from the atmosphere

As the world continues to burn 100 million barrels of oil a day – a rate that is expected to continue for the next 50 years – Stanford Earth researchers are developing greener ways of extracting the oil and mitigating the resulting greenhouse gases.

Animal biodiversity key part of carbon cycle

With abundant data on plants, large animals and their activity, and carbon soil levels in the Amazon, Stanford research suggests that large animal diversity influences carbon stocks and contributes to climate change mitigation.

Future of energy: Efficiency

With less demand from efficient buildings, transportation and appliances, the energy we make can go further.

Stanford researchers advance the future of energy

Research into renewable energy, batteries, carbon capture and storage, the electric grid and natural gas have sprung up around campus, helping to move the world to a more sustainable future.

Future of energy: Renewables

Advances in materials and technology are improving the cost and efficiency of renewable sources of energy.

Soil holds potential to slow global warming

The land under our feet and the plant matter it contains could offset a significant amount of carbon emissions if managed properly. More research is needed to unlock soil’s potential to mitigate global warming, improve crop yields and increase resilience to extreme weather.