Biology

In search of flatworms’ regenerative powers

No one knows exactly how flatworms can rebuild their entire bodies from the tiniest sliver. Now, bioengineers and materials scientists are building new tools to study the worms’ awesome regenerative powers.

Conservation clues from scant DNA

A new approach promises cheap, rapid analysis of genetic clues in degraded and left-behind material, such as hair and commercial food products.

Tunas, sharks and ships at sea

Researchers combine maps of marine predator habitats with satellite tracks of fishing fleets to identify regions where they overlap – a step toward more effective wildlife management on the high seas.

Linking bacterial populations with health

Two people may have different bacteria living on and in them, but the challenge is knowing which differences matter for health. Statistician Susan Holmes thinks she might have some answers.

Stanford School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences —

Species evolve ways to back up life’s machinery

A new analysis of biological data reveals that every species from bacteria to primates has developed ways to bypass breakdowns in the networks of proteins vital to sustaining life.

Plant biologist Winslow Briggs dies at 90

A global leader in plant genetics and physiology, Briggs published landmark research on the molecular mechanisms that plants and other organisms use to sense and respond to light.

Worms and plants could help reveal how neurological drugs work

Humans have relied on plants for millennia to treat a variety of neurological ailments. Now, researchers are using microscopic worms to better understand how plant molecules shape behavior – and perhaps develop better new drugs.

Biodiversity research at Stanford

Truly grasping the importance of biodiversity means diving down into the microscopic organisms in our soils and out to human social relationships affecting our ecosystems. The more we know, the better we can address threats to species diversity.

To save native grasslands, study invasive species

The order of arrival determines which invasive grasses predominate, according to a combination of experiments and computational modeling. The results could help in efforts to preserve the native plants that remain.