Biology

Teaching biology in the bush

Stanford students are traveling through Africa to learn effective mentoring and field techniques, on an expedition designed to provide new perspectives on ethical ecotourism, the applications of novel technology and defining meaningful collaborations in developing countries.

A wearable device measures cortisol in sweat

By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch developed in the lab of Alberto Salleo can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions.

Bacterial armor could be a new target for antibiotics

Boosting efforts to fight antibiotic resistance, Stanford researchers have found that a thin membrane, thought to be just a shrink wrap around some bacterial cell walls, has structural properties critical for survival.

A rare disease inspires a new test for aldehydes

Fanconi anemia is a rare but deadly disease, and there are no good drugs to treat its root cause. Now, Stanford researchers are developing a test that could help kids with the disease and millions more with related conditions.

Testing solutions to overheating in hazmat suits

With help from his students, Professor Craig Heller is keeping people cool and safe in personal protective gear, such as that worn by firefighters and health care workers treating infectious disease.

War, clan structure explain odd biological event

Undergraduates Tian Chen Zeng and Alan Aw worked with Marcus Feldman, a professor of biology, to show how social structure could explain a genetic puzzle about humans of the Stone Age.

Keeping the good effects of drugs, eliminating the bad

By combining computer simulations with laboratory experiments, an international research team revealed something new about a molecular pathway that enables roughly half of all medications to achieve their desired effects – but is also responsible for many side effects.