Biology

Miniature droplets could solve an origin-of-life riddle

Before life could begin, something had to kickstart the production of critical molecules. Chemistry Professor Richard Zare says that something may have been as simple as a mist made up of tiny drops of water.

Animal biodiversity key part of carbon cycle

With abundant data on plants, large animals and their activity, and carbon soil levels in the Amazon, Stanford research suggests that large animal diversity influences carbon stocks and contributes to climate change mitigation.

An algorithm for how ants create trail networks

Observing ants in the trees of a tropical forest, Professor Deborah Gordon recorded how, without a plan, the ants make and maintain their networks – and how they repair the network when it is ruptured.

Microbes in flower nectar affect pollination

Stanford’s community ecology lab has found that microbes in nectar can affect bird and insect interactions with the flowers and, as a result, whether they get pollinated.

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies —

New biosecurity initiative launched at FSI

A new biosecurity initiative at FSI is designed to protect public health from accelerating biological risks, both natural and manmade.

Engineering students help geneticists study coral bleaching

Tiny devices could help scientists study coral bleaching, parasites, molecular biology and more, but few scientists know how to use them. A new course aimed to change that by pairing students with labs looking for help.

Epiphany in the fish lab

Studying the brains of fish led undergraduate Danielle Katz in an unexpected direction – a degree in mechanical engineering.