Biology

Guide for science outreach

Science outreach efforts can encourage trust and interest in science, benefiting everyone involved. A guide produced by plant biologists from several institutions aims to make science outreach better and more effective.

Illuminating a sea turtle mystery

North Pacific loggerhead turtles’ years-long oceanic journeys remain poorly understood. Using data from satellite tracking and other techniques, scientists reveal a unique phenomenon that may explain the endangered migrants’ pathway.

An artful study of cellular development in leaves

Researchers tracked 20,000 cells to find out what made each unique and to learn how the cells coordinate to build a leaf. Collaboration with a visual artist added dimension to the work.

Aquaculture’s promise and peril

Twenty years ago, a Stanford-led analysis sparked controversy by highlighting fish farming’s damage to ocean fisheries. Now a follow-up study takes stock of the industry’s progress and points to opportunities for sustainable growth.

New technique reveals genes underlying human evolution

In separate studies, researchers compared gene regulation related to brain and face development in humans and chimpanzees using a new technique. In both cases, they discovered new genetic differences between these species.

How diseases and history are intertwined

In an introductory seminar course, students explored how vector-borne diseases have influenced history and found that they often most heavily impacted marginalized communities.

How soil fungi respond to wildfire

When wildfires swept through the North Bay in 2017, graduate student Gabriel Smith saw a unique opportunity to study how fire affected his research subject: soil fungi.

Could kelp help relieve ocean acidification?

A new analysis of California’s Monterey Bay evaluates kelp’s potential to reduce ocean acidification, the harmful fallout from climate change on marine ecosystems and the food they produce for human populations.