Biology

Stanford School of Humanities and Sciences —

Stanford researchers conduct census of cell surface proteins

A new technique systematically surveys proteins on the outer surface of cells that act like molecular social cues to guide cell-cell interactions and assembly into tissues and organs.

Antiviral treatments inspire new kind of cancer drug

An effort to thwart viral diseases like hepatitis or the common cold led Stanford virologist Jeffrey Glenn to a new collaboration and a novel class of cancer drugs that appears effective in mice.

Tracking animals with DNA

Genetic material left behind by animals can provide critical clues to aid conservation and research. New research shows studying DNA in soil samples can be more effective, efficient and affordable than traditional tracking methods, such as camera traps, for assessing biodiversity.

Beyond campus: Photos of Stanford researchers in the field

This year, researchers traveled across the country and around the world, producing work that adds to our understanding of life on Earth and informs potential solutions for improving our health and the health of our planet.

Infant blood markers predict childhood mental health

A newfound link between levels of “bad” cholesterol at birth and subsequent childhood behavior could help identify and treat people who are prone to experiencing depression and other mental difficulties.

First-ever recording of a blue whale’s heart rate

With a lot of ingenuity and a little luck, researchers monitored the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild. The measurement suggests that blue whale hearts are operating at extremes – and may limit the whale’s size.

AI and gene-editing pioneers to discuss ethics

Two pioneering scientists who transformed the fields of artificial intelligence and gene editing discuss the impacts of their technologies and the ethics of scientific discovery leading up to a public talk later this month.

Stanford researchers lay out first genetic history of Rome

Despite extensive records of the history of Rome, little is known about the city’s population over time. A new genetic history of the Eternal City reveals a dynamic population shaped in part by political and historical events.