Artificial intelligence

Hybrid chips can run AI on battery-powered devices

In traditional electronics, separate chips process and store data, wasting energy as they toss data back and forth over what engineers call a “memory wall.” New algorithms combine several energy-efficient hybrid chips to create the illusion of one mega–AI chip.

Studying trust in autonomous products

Stanford engineers investigated how people’s moods might affect their trust of autonomous products, such as smart speakers. They uncovered a complicated relationship.

Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence —

When algorithms compete, who wins?

Over time, prediction algorithms become specialized for an increasingly narrow slice of the population, and the average quality of their predictions declines.

Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence —

AI improves control of robot arms

Algorithms developed by Stanford researchers could one day help disabled people fluidly and intuitively control robot arms to help with everyday tasks.

AI detects hidden earthquakes

Tiny movements in Earth’s outermost layer may provide a Rosetta Stone for deciphering the physics and warning signs of big quakes. New algorithms that work a little like human vision are now detecting these long-hidden microquakes in the growing mountain of seismic data.

Stanford HAI —

The geographic bias in medical AI tools

Patient data from just three states trains most AI diagnostic tools. Raising questions about the validity of the algorithms for patients in other areas.

Stanford launches AI-powered TV news analyzer

The Stanford Cable TV News Analyzer is an interactive tool that uses AI to search transcripts and calculate the screen time of public figures appearing on cable TV news.