Research

Is our universe one of many?

This five-part series tells the story of how theoretical physicists at Stanford helped develop the String Theory Landscape – and in the process sparked a fierce and still ongoing debate about what science is and what it should be.

Head and neck positioning affects concussion risk

The way our head and neck are positioned during a head-on impact may significantly affect the risk of concussion – but tensed up neck muscles seem to offer far less protection.

Teaching biology in the bush

Stanford students are traveling through Africa to learn effective mentoring and field techniques, on an expedition designed to provide new perspectives on ethical ecotourism, the applications of novel technology and defining meaningful collaborations in developing countries.

Stanford Medicine —

Gut bacteria byproduct protects against salmonella

A molecule called propionate inhibits the growth of Salmonella in mice and may be a promising new treatment for people sickened by the pathogen, according to a new Stanford study.

Widespread groundwater contamination risk from chromium

Natural sources of the toxic form of chromium appear in wells that provide drinking water to a large population in California, offering a new perspective on California’s groundwater management challenges.

A wearable device measures cortisol in sweat

By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch developed in the lab of Alberto Salleo can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions.

Liquid-metal, high-voltage flow battery

Stanford scientists have developed a new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal; it more than doubled the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power.