Research

A wearable device measures cortisol in sweat

By drawing in a bit of sweat, a patch developed in the lab of Alberto Salleo can reveal how much cortisol a person is producing. Cortisol is known as the stress hormone but is involved in many important physiological functions.

Liquid-metal, high-voltage flow battery

Stanford scientists have developed a new type of flow battery that involves a liquid metal; it more than doubled the maximum voltage of conventional flow batteries and could lead to affordable storage of renewable power.

Finding the pulse of the polar vortex

A new analysis of how air moves between two layers of Earth’s atmosphere reveals a deep system that could enable long-term weather forecasts and better climate models.

AI predicts drug pair side effects

Millions of people take upwards of five medications a day, but testing the side effects of such combinations was impractical – until now.

How emotions may result in hiring, workplace bias

Stanford study suggests that the emotions American employers are looking for in job candidates may not match up with emotions valued by jobseekers from some cultural backgrounds – potentially leading to hiring bias.

Learning through sound

The audible world contains vast amounts of information about the world around us. Scholars from across Stanford are exploring this invisible landscape as a research tool and as a way of understanding each other.