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Research

Stanford Medicine —

J&J coronavirus vaccine produces low antibody response, study finds

In a head-to-head comparison of the three widely used coronavirus vaccines in the United States, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine yielded a strikingly lower antibody response in a Stanford School of Medicine-led study.

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Stanford Engineering —

Tracking Polynesian exploration

Scientists from Stanford and Mexico developed advanced versions of the algorithms used to reveal people’s ancestries to show how Polynesian mariners crossed a vast ocean.

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Stanford Medicine —

Men and women experience brain injuries differently

While analyzing brain trauma data from the Department of Veterans Affairs, neurosurgery Professor Odette Harris realized there was a big gender difference in the aftermath of traumatic brain injuries, and no one was talking about it.

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Stanford Graduate School of Education —

How to teach data science in‌ K-12 schools

A team of scholars led by education Professor Jo Boaler introduces standards for teaching data science to students from kindergarten to high school.

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Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence —

Stanford researchers build $400 self-navigating smart cane

Incorporating sensing and way-finding approaches from robotics and self-driving vehicles, the cane could reshape life for people with blindness or sight impairment.

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Stanford Medicine —

Breast cancer mutations don’t lower survival rates

Newly diagnosed breast or ovarian cancer patients who carry common cancer-associated mutations have similar or better short-term survival rates than those with no mutations, researchers report.

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Stanford News —

Pollution’s impact on child health

New evidence of the link between air pollution and children’s respiratory health indicates that one industry may play an outsized role in the problem.

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Stanford Medicine —

Children born early at risk from too much screen time

Children born very prematurely are at risk for cognitive and behavioral problems linked to excess screen time, a Stanford Medicine-led study shows.

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Stanford News —

Extinction changes the rules of body size evolution

A sweeping analysis of marine fossils from most of the past half-billion years shows the usual rules of body size evolution change during mass extinctions and their recoveries. The discovery is an early step toward predicting how evolution will play out on the other side of the current extinction crisis.

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Stanford Engineering —

Gels are changing the face of engineering … and medicine

Eric Appel explains why these “Goldilocks” materials are among the most promising areas of research today.

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