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Health & medicine

Stanford Medicine —

Drug limits allergic reactions

Accidental exposure to allergy-triggering foods can have life-threatening consequences for children with food allergies. A new treatment reduces the risk.

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Stanford News —

Can providers be trained to shape patient mindsets?

What people think, believe, or expect about their health care can influence outcomes. Can providers be trained to shape patient outlooks?

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Stanford Medicine —

A new look at ketamine

Ketamine is “a very weird drug” – and providers should be cautious in their excitement to prescribe it for a wide variety of conditions, the authors of a new Stanford Medicine study say.

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Stanford Medicine —

A precision health approach to preventing early births

A new study explains why progesterone injections to prevent prematurity only work for some women, setting the stage for more targeted interventions.

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Stanford Medicine —

Rooting out systemic racism in maternity care

California has the lowest rate of preventable maternal deaths in the U.S., but it’s still unacceptably high, says Stanford Medicine’s Amanda Williams. “And way too many of these women look like me.”

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Stanford Medicine —

Alexa, how much insulin do I need today?

An AI app that runs on smart speakers can help patients manage their Type 2 diabetes by telling them the correct insulin dose to take.

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Stanford Medicine —

Psychoactive drug treats PTSD

A plant-based psychoactive compound safely led to improvements in depression, anxiety, and functioning among military veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

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Stanford Medicine —

Engineered human heart tissue shows mechanics of tachycardia

Stanford Medicine researchers engineered stem cell-derived heart tissues to study how tachycardia affects the heart and to uncover the inner workings of our body’s engine.

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Stanford News —

New research reveals metastasis on/off switch

New research from Stanford and the Arc Institute could lead to a new and more effective immunotherapy and help clinicians better predict patient response to existing medicines.

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Stanford Medicine —

Smartwatches detect abnormal heart rhythms in kids

Apple Watches have some advantages over traditional cardiac diagnostic devices for detecting arrhythmias in children, who may go months between episodes.

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