Stanford’s winter quarter guest artists

Stanford in winter is a hotbed of creativity and artistic expression. The extensive roster of guest artists on campus includes actor/alum Sterling K. Brown, recent winner of the Golden Globe for best actor in a TV drama series and the first African-American male in history to do so, with fellow actor/alum Ryan Michelle Bathe performing scenes from August Wilson’s plays and talking about their time at Stanford and subsequent acting careers.

Guest music makers on campus include Cameron Carpenter, playing his revolutionary digital International Touring Organ; Renée Fleming, discussing her work with the National Institutes of Health exploring the connections between music and neurological health before a recital in Bing Concert Hall; and Darlene Love, the best-known unknown in rock history.

Pope.L, a visual artist on several “most influential” lists of late, gives a lecture about his recent work, Louise Glück is in residence as Stanford’s Mohr Visiting Poet, and L.A. Dance Project takes over Memorial Auditorium’s main stage.

Making their Stanford debut is the guerrilla-folk party-punk band Lemon Bucket Orkestra and keyboard/synth/app developer extraordinaire Jordan Rudess. Returning favorites are cellist Yo-Yo Ma and acousmatic composer and sound artist Natasha Barrett. The full roster of 70 guest artists follows.

PERFORMANCE

600 HIGHWAYMEN

Young and innovative theater artists Abigail Browde and Michael Silverstone, together known as 600 HIGHWAYMEN, present a story about a party, just an ordinary party, and request your participation. It is an invitation to be together, to have faith in each other, and to show each other how warm and healing trust among strangers can be.

Performances Feb. 14-16

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

EMANUEL AX

For the love of Brahms, pianist Emanuel Ax, violinist Leonidas Kavakos and cellist Yo-Yo Ma join forces on the Bing stage for an unforgettable performance.

Concert March 1

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

NATASHA BARRETT

Composer Natasha Barrett is in residence at CCRMA, the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, for two weeks in February. Watch for a performance date.

Residency Feb. 7-21

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

THEATER, FILM, TV

RYAN MICHELLE BATHE

Actors Ryan Michelle Bathe, ’98, and Sterling K. Brown, ’98, perform scenes from August Wilson’s plays and talk with Harry J. Elam Jr., Stanford vice president for the arts, about their time at Stanford and subsequent acting careers.

Performance and conversation Feb. 9

Hosted by Office of the Vice President for the Arts, Department of Theater and Performance Studies, Institute for Diversity in the Arts, Black Community Services Center, African & African American Studies Program

CREATIVE WRITING

AIMEE BENDER

Aimee Bender is the author of short fiction and five books: The Girl in the Flammable Skirt (1998), a New York Times Notable Book; An Invisible Sign of My Own (2000) a Los Angeles Times pick of the year; Willful Creatures (2005), nominated by The Believer as one of the best books of the year; The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake (2010), winner of the SCIBA award for best fiction and an Alex Award; and The Color Master (2013), a New York Times Notable Book. After her presentation, Bender will be in conversation with Scott Hutchins, Stanford lecturer in the Department of English. This event is part of the Frankenstein@200 initiative at the Center for Biomedical Ethics.

Conversation March 12

Hosted by McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society

MUSIC

MONTE BOOKER

Monte Booker is a 22-year-old product of Chicago’s South Side who has only been producing music since hearing Kendrick Lamar’s 2012 hit “The Recipe.” His instrumentals released on SoundCloud kickstarted his career. Since then, he’s released five singles and an EP titled Soulection White Label and has been featured on several records. He has also produced tracks for a number of acclaimed artists, including Mick Jenkins and Noname. He performs in Bing Studio.

Concert Jan. 19

Hosted by Stanford Live, Stanford Concert Network

MUSIC

ANGELA BROWER

Rising American mezzo-soprano Angela Brower offers a voice masterclass and performs works by Dvořák, Berlioz, Copland and Alban Berg with pianist Eckart Sellheim as part of the Shenson Recital Series. Raised in Arizona, Brower started her career as a young artist singing at the Glimmerglass Opera Young American Artists Program in 2008. She was then invited to join the Opera Studio at the Bavarian State Opera in Munich, where she later became a member of the ensemble during 2010-16. Her portrayal of Dorabella in Così fan tutte earned her particular attention, leading to her receiving the prestigious Munich Festival Prize in 2009. The 2017-18 season begins with Brower returning to Munich as Dorabella.

Recital Jan. 21, masterclass Jan. 22

Hosted by Department of Music

THEATER, FILM, TV

STERLING K. BROWN

Actors Sterling K. Brown, ’98, and Ryan Michelle Bathe, ’98, perform scenes from August Wilson’s plays and talk with Harry J. Elam Jr., Stanford vice president for the arts, about their time at Stanford and subsequent acting careers.

Performance and conversation Feb. 9

Hosted by Office of the Vice President for the Arts, Department of Theater and Performance Studies, Institute for Diversity in the Arts, Black Community Services Center, African & African American Studies Program

MUSIC

BUMPER JACKSONS

Hot and sweet, the Bumper Jacksons paint America’s story from the seductive sounds of New Orleans to the hollers of the Appalachian Mountains. Bursting at the seams with rich threads of Americana, their playfully creative originals and reimagined roots music earned them Artist of the Year (2015) and Best Folk Band (2013-15) at the Washington Area Music Awards. Their hard-driving energy brings you into the center of a party where everyone’s invited and the dance floor never sleeps.

Concerts Feb. 24

Hosted by Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE ART

NAO BUSTAMANTE

Performance artists Nao Bustamante and Rafa Esparza are the guest artists for the Department of Theater and Performance Studies’ winter installment of Vital Signs, a lecture and performance series that highlights and showcases underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art and body art, among others, by artists from underrepresented communities.

Performance and lecture Feb. 14-15

Hosted by Department of Theater and Performance Studies, Anderson Collection, Department of Art and Art History, Stanford Arts Institute

MUSIC

CAMERON CARPENTER

In a performance that promises to be one of a kind, Carpenter – who will be in residence on campus – plays his revolutionary digital International Touring Organ, custom built by digital organ pioneers Marshall & Ogletree. Known for his fearless reinterpretations of the classics, Carpenter has won international acclaim for his brilliance, not to mention his sartorial style.

Concert Feb. 3

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

CHAHLA CHAFIQ

Chahla Chafiq is an author, researcher and human rights activist. Her writing in Persian and French includes essays, research articles, short stories and novels. She is on campus to discuss her latest book, Ask the Mirror (2015), and to reflect on literature and exile. Her talk is part of the Stanford Festival of Iranian Arts.

Talk March 8

Hosted by the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies

MUSIC

BILL CHARLAP TRIO

It’s no wonder that pianist Bill Charlap loves the music of the Great American Songbook: It’s in his DNA. The son of Broadway composer Moose Charlap and singer Sandy Stewart, Charlap began playing the piano at age 3; his interpretations of American popular songs and jazz standards led to performances with Wynton Marsalis and Barbra Streisand, and a longstanding residency at the legendary Village Vanguard. In 2016, Charlap’s collaboration with Tony Bennett led to a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Pop Album. In Uptown/Downtown, Charlap and his trio take the audience on an exploration of New York’s geography in song, from Berlin and Bernstein’s Broadway to the Harlem stride of Eubie Blake and Fats Waller, to the singular songbook of Duke Ellington, with other exciting stops along the way. Special guests and legendary vocalists Mary Stallings and Freddy Cole join the Bill Charlap Trio on stage.

Concert Feb. 10

Hosted by Stanford Live

Music

KWEKU COLLINS

Kweku Collins is a 21-year-old rapper/producer/songwriter who has been making music for most of his life. In 2015, just shy of his high school graduation, Collins joined Chicago indie rap outfit Closed Sessions and shortly after released his debut EP Say It Here While It’s Safe. The EP received critical praise and landed Collins on Pigeons and Planes’ 20 rappers under 20 list. In 2016, Collins followed up with Nat Love, an LP that garnered an 8.0 Pitchfork review, produced a Pitchfork “best new track” and landed him in publications such as The FADER, Billboard, Chicago Reader and more. He performs in Bing Studio.

Concert Feb. 23

Hosted by Stanford Live, Stanford Concert Network

DANCE

COMPANY WANG RAMIREZ

Monchichi, a fusion of hip-hop and contemporary dance, was created by the duo Wang Ramirez, a couple onstage and off. Wang brings suppleness and Asian musicality to her movement, and Ramirez brings his Mediterranean vivacity. Together, they tackle Monchichi as they construct their life together – in perfect balance between masculine and feminine. Dance is their language, but so are words. Monchichi is a piece full of humor and self-deprecation, a love story in different languages.

Performance Feb. 28

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC/DANCE

ÇUDAMANI

Among the more surprising influences on American composers is the traditional Balinese art of gamelan. The gigantic ensemble of instruments’ resonating tones and rich sound have captivated composers like Canadian Colin McPhee and American composers Lou Harrison, Charles Ives, John Cage and Steve Reich. Experience the inspirational source of these composers in this special performance by the musicians and dancers of Gamelan Çudamani.

Performance Feb. 28

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC

The prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia sends its most promising young students on tour to play alongside faculty and noted alumni. This program pays tribute to Leonard Bernstein (himself a Curtis alum), in celebration of his centenary, with Bernstein’s Clarinet Sonata (with alum, David Shifrin) and songs from West Side Story, alongside pieces by two of his contemporary influences, Aaron Copland and George Gershwin.

Concert Mar. 4

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

JEREMY DENK

Jeremy Denk, American piano virtuoso and a MacArthur Foundation “genius” award winner, visits the Bing with noted violinist Stefan Jackiw and members of the Stanford Chamber Chorale for a performance of all the sonatas of the American modernist composer Charles Ives. Ives drew upon contemporary hymns, songs and marches to eloquently convey the nuances of the American experience. Nobody is better equipped than Denk to demonstrate Ives’ influences and his continuing impact on American music.

Concert Jan. 28

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

CAROL EDGARIAN

As part of the Stanford Writers in Conversation series, writer Carol Edgarian joins Sara Houghteling, former Nancy Packer Lecturer in Continuing Studies, to discuss Edgarian’s writing process and projects, as well as her personal insights into contemporary trends in literary magazines and publishing. Edgarian is the author of Rise the Euphrates and Three Stages of Amazement, which reached the New York Times bestseller list in its first week of publication. She is also the co-founder, editor and publisher of Narrative Magazine, an online literary magazine.

Conversation Feb. 8

Hosted by Stanford Continuing Studies

MUSIC

JOHN DORNENBURG

John Dornenburg, viola da gamba, and Yuko Tanaka, harpsichord, perform selected Pièces de viole suites by Marin Marais, as well as works by Johann Froberger in Memorial Church.

Concert Jan. 10

Hosted by Department of Music

PERFORMANCE ART

RAFA ESPARZA

Performance artists Rafa Esparza and Nao Bustamante are the guest artists for the Department of Theater and Performance Studies’ winter installment of Vital Signs, a lecture and performance series that highlights and showcases underrepresented performance forms such as experimental performance art, durational art and body art, among others, by artists from underrepresented communities.

Performance and lecture Feb. 14-15

Hosted by Department of Theater and Performance Studies, Anderson Collection, Department of Art and Art History, Stanford Arts Institute

MUSIC

PAULA FAN

The Shenson Recital Series presents Paula Fan, piano, and Jeremy Huw Williams, baritone, performing works by George Butterworth, William Walton, Claude Debussy, Grace Williams, Barbara Jazwinski and Paul Phillips. Fan has performed as a soloist and chamber musician on five continents, recorded 17 albums, and broadcast for the BBC, NPR, Radio Television China and other international stations.

Concert March 7

Hosted by Department of Music

DANCE

KATIE FAULKNER

Katie Faulkner is a choreographer, performer and teacher artist. In 2006 she founded the little seismic dance company. Since its inception, Faulkner has received support in the form of numerous grants, commissions, residencies and awards. She has been an active educator since 2002 and is currently on faculty at the University of San Francisco; University of California, Berkeley; and ODC in San Francisco. Faulkner is on campus to teach a masterclass open to Stanford students followed by a public discussion.

Masterclass and discussion Feb. 23

Hosted by the Department of Theater and Performance Studies

Katie Faulkner

MUSIC

JULIAN FLEISHER

Singer-songwriter-bandleader-producer-actor-former-writer Julian Fleisher is a genuine multi-hyphenate – the kind of restless creative spirit that people used to call a Renaissance Man. His roof-raising, barn-burning concert for the Bing Studio Cabaret is devoted to the proposition that 1975 was the very best year in American popular music. With his full Rather Big Band behind him, Fleisher takes the audience to church where the gospel is the music of the 1970s. Baby, we were born to run!

Concerts Jan. 26-27

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC, MEDICINE

RENÉE FLEMING

Renée Fleming is one of the most beloved and acclaimed sopranos of all time, captivating audiences with her magnificent voice and indelible artistry. In 2013, President Obama awarded her the National Medal of Arts, America’s highest honor for an individual artist. For years, Fleming has graced the world’s greatest opera stages and concert halls – now extending her reach to jazz clubs, Broadway and even the Super Bowl (the first classical artist to do so).

Prior to her Jan. 31 Bing Concert Hall recital, Fleming speaks about her work with the National Institutes of Health exploring the connections between music and neurological health, joined by Dr. Charles Limb, chief of otology, neurotology and skull base surgery at the University of California, San Francisco.

Conversation Jan. 30 and recital Jan. 31

Hosted by Stanford Live, Medicine & the Muse Program

MUSIC

ANA GASTEYER

Audiences fell in love with Ana Gasteyer on six seasons of Saturday Night Live, where she unabashedly played, and often sang, at full tilt. When she steps up to the mic, she evokes the swagger of an era when a lady ruled a nightclub and an audience knew they were in for a good time. The patter is real, the lyrics are timeless, and the music swings.

Concerts Jan. 26-27

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

LOUISE GLÜCK

Louise Glück is in residence during winter quarter as Stanford’s Mohr Visiting Poet. She is teaching an undergraduate course, English 192V, The Occasions of Poetry, and will give a public reading. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Glück is a former Poet Laureate of the United States and the author of a dozen widely acclaimed books. Her work is noted for its emotional intensity and technical precision; her language, staunchly straightforward, is clear and refined, so much so that one does “not see the intervening fathoms.” Glück’s most recent collection, Faithful and Virtuous Night, won the 2014 National Book Award for Poetry. Other books include A Village Life (2009), which was shortlisted for the International Griffin Poetry Prize, and Averno (2006), which was nominated for the National Book Award and won the L.L. Winship/PEN New England Award, and was listed by The New York Times Book Review as one of the 100 Notable Books of the Year.

Winter residency, reading Jan. 31

Hosted by Creative Writing Program

MUSIC

JACK QUARTET

The JACK Quartet present a concert of works by Stanford graduate composers and faculty as part of Music 541 on the CCRMA stage. The program includes pieces by Constantin Basica, Julie Herndon, Jessie Marino, Charlie Sdraulig, Davor Branimir Vincze, Nick Virzi and Mark Applebaum. Deemed “superheroes of the new music world” (Boston Globe), the JACK Quartet is “the go-to quartet for contemporary music, tying impeccable musicianship to intellectual ferocity and a take-no-prisoners sense of commitment.” And the Washington Post declares, “They are a musical vehicle of choice to the next great composers who walk among us.”

Concert Jan. 19

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

MUSIC

STEFAN JACKIW

Noted violinist Stefan Jackiw visits the Bing with Jeremy Denk, American piano virtuoso and a MacArthur Foundation “genius” award winner, and members of the Stanford Chamber Chorale for a performance of all the sonatas of the American modernist composer Charles Ives. Ives drew upon contemporary hymns, songs and marches to eloquently convey the nuances of the American experience.

Concert Jan. 28

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ROB KAPILOW

Rob Kapilow looks at the story behind Leonard Bernstein’s songs from West Side Story. Bernstein in the 1960s was himself a popular advocate of classical music, conducting and narrating the New York Philharmonic Young People’s Concerts live on television for a national audience. As an American composer and conductor, Bernstein crossed genres, lending his gifts to Broadway, the opera house and the concert hall. Two vocalists will join Kapilow at the piano.

Concert Feb. 7

Hosted by Stanford Live

PHOTOGRAPHY, FILM

ED KASHI

Ed Kashi is a photojournalist and filmmaker dedicated to documenting the social and political issues that define our times. In the digital age, we are deluged with visual information and an overabundance of images. What distinguishes Kashi’s work is the intimacy and complexity of his storytelling. His Stanford lecture spans a range of stories, issues and approaches representing the frontiers of visual storytelling, from smartphone photography to short documentary films. Kashi discusses his work with Syrian refugees and the traumatic impact of oil in the Niger Delta, as well as stories closer to home about immigration and aging.

Lecture March 1

Hosted by Stanford Continuing Studies

MUSIC

LEONIDAS KAVAKOS

For the love of Brahms, violinist Leonidas Kavakos, pianist Emanuel Ax and cellist Yo-Yo Ma join forces on the Bing stage for an unforgettable performance.

Concert March 1

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

MARI KIMURA

Virtuoso violinist, composer and live electronics expert Mari Kimura is a featured artist at CCRMA’s winter open house event. She will perform new and recent works written by and for her.

Performance March 2

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

DANCE

L.A. DANCE PROJECT

Former Paris Opera Ballet Artistic Director Benjamin Millepied, who choreographed the movie Black Swan, founded the L.A. Dance Project, an artist collective, in 2012 with composers Nico Muhly and Nicholas Britell, art consultant Matthieu Humery and producer Charles Fabius. The Project aims to make new work for a small group of dancers in collaboration with visual artists, musicians and composers to perform in both traditional and unconventional spaces. The Stanford program includes Murder Ballades (2013), choreography by Justin Peck and original score by Bryce Dessner; Second Quartet (2017), choreography by Noé Soulier and music by Tom De Cock (Ictus Ensemble) and Noé Soulier; and Hearts & Arrows (2015), choreography by Millepied and music by Philip Glass.

Performances Jan. 26-27

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

K.D. LANG

A hot ticket who may just be, as Tony Bennett said, “the best singer of her generation,” k.d. lang pulls into the Bing for one night only to celebrate the 25th anniversary of her platinum selling Ingénue album. A little bit country, a little bit alt, a little bit rock ’n’ roll, lang keeps changing, growing, amazing. Experience lang live as she brings her singular singing style to classics from her 30-year repertoire.

Concert March 2

Hosted by Stanford Live

THEATER, PLAYWRITING

YOUNG JEAN LEE

Playwright and director Young Jean Lee is this year’s Visiting Artist in Playwriting with the Department of Theater and Performance Studies. Lee has been called “hands down, the most adventurous downtown playwright of her generation” by the New York Times.

Visiting faculty 2017-18

Hosted by Department of Theater and Performance Studies

MUSIC

YANKY AND SHULEM LEMMER

Yanky and Shulem Lemmer present a Jewish musical journey followed by a conversation with ethnomusicologist Mark L. Kligman, the Mickey Katz Endowed Chair in Jewish Music at UCLA, and Jeremiah Lockwood, Stanford PhD candidate in education and Jewish studies.

Concert and discussion Jan. 31

Hosted by Department of Music, Stanford Live, Taube Center for Jewish Studies, Institute for Diversity in the Arts

MUSIC, THEATER

LEMON BUCKET ORKESTRA

A sensation at the 2016 Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Counting Sheep, a Ukrainian folk opera created by Mark and Marichka Marczyk (featuring Toronto’s Lemon Bucket Orkestra, a guerrilla-folk party-punk band), recounts the 2013 outbursts, violence and sniper fire of Ukraine’s Maidan Revolution, as witnessed by the Marczyks, who emigrated to Canada soon after. Through traditional choral songs, it explores the human condition in times of violent upheaval and evokes the yearning for a better tomorrow.

Performances Feb. 7-10

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

UTE LEMPER

Sultry German chanteuse Ute Lemper joins her countrymen the Vogler Quartet and clarinetist/pianist Stefan Malzew for a collection of songs that takes listeners on a journey through time via Europe and Argentina. Crossing national and stylistic boundaries alike, Paris Days, Berlin Nights present an extraordinary portrait of the cultural melting pot of 1920s Europe, featuring chansons of Édith Piaf, Kurt Weill, Hanns Eisler, Astor Piazzolla, Chava Alberstein and Jacques Brel.

Concert March 17

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

DARLENE LOVE

For more than 50 years, singer Darlene Love has been making rock ’n’ roll’s world go ’round. In the early 1960s, she was part of Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound for “He’s a Rebel,” doing backing (as well as uncredited lead) vocals for “Da Doo Ron Ron,” “Be My Baby” and scores of other hits. With the 2013 documentary Twenty Feet from Stardom, she became the best-known unknown in rock history. Joined for part of the program by the Stanford Symphony Orchestra, Love will fill the house with nostalgia and her timeless, soaring voice.

Concert Feb. 9

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

YO-YO MA

For the love of Brahms, cellist Yo-Yo Ma, violinist Leonidas Kavakos and pianist Emanuel Ax join forces on the Bing stage for an unforgettable performance.

Concert March 1

Hosted by Stanford Live

PERFORMANCE

MACHINE DE CIRQUE

Even as big circuses are folding their tents, intimate circuses are on the rise. The Quebec City–based Machine de Cirque is a prime example: just five guys existing in a postapocalyptic world without women or computers. How will they survive? Watch and see. Machine de Cirque was founded in 2013 with the aim of engaging imaginations in their community. It adroitly blends acrobatics, juggling, music, dance, clowning and derring-do.

Performances March 16-17

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

STEFAN MALZEW

Clarinetist and pianist Stefan Malzew joins sultry German chanteuse Ute Lemper and her countrymen the Vogler Quartet for a collection of songs that takes listeners on a journey through time via Europe and Argentina. Crossing national and stylistic boundaries alike, Paris Days, Berlin Nights present an extraordinary portrait of the cultural melting pot of 1920s Europe, featuring chansons of Édith Piaf, Kurt Weill, Hanns Eisler, Astor Piazzolla, Chava Alberstein and Jacques Brel.

Concert March 17

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

JOHN MAUCERI

Guest conductor John Mauceri, “a doyen of musical theatre” (Gramophone), leads the Stanford Symphony Orchestra in composer Danny Elfman’s new Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (Eleven Eleven). The work, which premiered in June at the Prague Proms, was jointly commissioned by the Czech National Symphony Orchestra, Stanford Live and the Royal Scottish National Orchestra. Works by Bernstein and William Walton round out the program.

Concerts March 10-11

Hosted by Stanford Live, Department of Music

MUSIC

MARIN MAZZIE

The career of three-time Tony Award nominee Marin Mazzie spans symphony halls, cabaret and concert venues, the Broadway stage, and London’s West End. She recently starred as Anna Leonowens in The King and I at Lincoln Center Theater and received Tony and Drama Desk nominations and an Outer Critics Circle Award for her performance as Lilli/Katharine in the hit revival of Kiss Me, Kate. She’s been seen with the New York Philharmonic in two of their PBS specials: Sondheim: The Birthday Concert and as Guenevere in their Live at Lincoln Center performance of Camelot. Join the Broadway diva for an intimate evening of cabaret in the Bing Studio.

Concerts March 23-24

Hosted by Stanford Live

CREATIVE WRITING

CLAIRE MESSUD

Claire Messud is a recipient of Guggenheim and Radcliffe fellowships and the Strauss Living Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Author of six previous works of fiction, her most recent novel is The Burning Girl. Her reading in Cubberley Auditorium is part of the Lane Lecture Series.

Reading Jan. 22

Hosted by Creative Writing Program

MUSIC

WESTON OLENCKI

Composer/performers Weston Olencki and Eric Wubbels present two new works written by – and for – the duo: Olencki’s recasting (2016-18, premiere) for prepared piano, transducers, synthesizers, electronics and objects; and Wubbels’ contraposition (2016-17) for trombone and prepared piano. These works explore shared concerns of virtuosity, synchronization and hybridization using languages developed through intensive long-term collaboration and friendship.

Concert Jan. 13

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

THEATER, DANCE

JOE ORRACH

Versatile performer Joe Orrach, actor, tap sensation and former USAF welterweight boxing champ, embodies four dynamic and passionate characters in an emotionally charged play titled In My Corner. Accompanied by his jazz trio and a lively original score by jazz pianist Matt Clark, Orrach blends the rhythms of tap, boxing, salsa and rock ’n’ roll into an energetic and intimate narrative. The original play, written by Lizbeth Hasse and Orrach, and directed by Jeremiah Chechik (Benny and Joon, Diabolique), is a father-son story of a street-smart, wise guy Puerto Rican–Italian kid from the Bronx who comes of age in the ring and on the dance floor.

Performance Jan. 11

Hosted by Stanford Arts Institute, Department of Comparative Literature, Humanities Center, Department of Theater and Performance Studies, Department of Music, ITALIC

MUSIC

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA AND CHORALE

The orchestra pays tribute to perhaps the best known of the Baroque composers, Arcangelo Corelli, who influenced not only his generation of composers but the next. Organist Richard Egarr conducts and also solos in the Handel Organ Concerto No. 15 in D Minor, HWV 304. Also benefiting from PBO’s expert musicianship and period instruments are concerti grossi by Corelli and Handel and a Georg Muffat sonata.

Concert March 9

Hosted by Stanford Live

VISUAL ART

POPE.L

Pope.L delivers a lecture about about his recent works. He is a visual artist and educator whose multidisciplinary practice uses binaries, contraries and preconceived notions embedded within contemporary culture to create art works in various formats, for example, writing, painting, performance, installation, video and sculpture. Building upon his long history of enacting arduous, provocative, absurdist performances and interventions in public spaces, Pope.L applies some of the same social, formal and performative strategies to his interests in language, system, gender, race and community. The goals for his work are several: joy, money and uncertainty – not necessarily in that order.

Lecture Jan. 18

Hosted by Department of Art and Art History

MUSIC

RADCLIFFE CHORAL SOCIETY

Since its inception in 1899, the Radcliffe Choral Society from Harvard University has gained a reputation as one of the leading women’s choruses in the United States. Under the direction of Andrew Clark, these 40 undergraduates and graduate students present a richly varied recital of historical and contemporary repertoire in the stunning acoustic of Stanford Memorial Church. The ensemble is joined by the Stanford Chamber Chorale for a portion of the program.

Concert Jan. 13

Hosted by Department of Music

PHOTOGRAPHY

REZA

REZA is an acclaimed photojournalist whose work has been featured in National Geographic, Time, Stern, Newsweek, El País and Paris Match, as well as a series of books, exhibitions and documentaries made for the National Geographic Channel. He discusses the importance of using images to serve social change, by training younger generations to become the actors of the future. His lecture is part of the Stanford Festival of Iranian Arts.

Lecture March 13

Hosted by the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies

VISUAL ART, MUSIC

MANUEL ROCHA ITURBIDE

In this lecture, composer and artist Manuel Rocha Iturbide talks about his different works (composition, sound sculpture and sound installation, conceptual art, graphics, etc.) in the fields of visual art and music, focusing his attention on leading concepts that drive his ideas such as complexity, deconstruction, emptiness and chance, and giving utterance to the different elements that conform a transdisciplinary work or art, like context, time, space and intermediality.

Lecture Feb. 15

Hosted by Department of Art and Art History

MUSIC

MASUMI PER ROSTAD

In a concert with guest viola player Masumi Per Rostad, the St. Lawrence String Quartet performs Mozart and Tchaikovsky alongside a new work by Stanford composer Mark Applebaum.

Concert Feb. 11

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

JORDAN RUDESS

Keyboard/synth/app developer Jordan Rudess is in residence at CCRMA, the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics, for the winter quarter, which includes a public performance in Memorial Church. Voted “Best Keyboardist of All Time” by Music Radar Magazine, Rudess is best known as the keyboardist/multi-instrumentalist extraordinaire for the platinum-selling Grammy-nominated prog rock band Dream Theater.

Winter residency, concert Feb. 22

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

MUSIC

JOHN SANTOS

John Santos, one of the foremost exponents of Afro-Latin music in the world today, appears with the Stanford Afro-Latin Jazz Ensemble. Santos is a seven-time Grammy-nominated percussionist and a U.S. Artists Fontanals Fellow. He was the 2013-14 SFJazz resident artistic director.

Concert March 10

Hosted by Department of Music

THEATER

DOMINIQUE SERRAND

Paris native Dominique Serrand is the artistic director and co-founder of the Tony Award-winning Theatre de la Jeune Lune, where he has acted, conceived, directed and designed (sets/lights/video) for most Jeune Lune productions for over 30 years, concentrating primarily on directing. Serrand directs Stanford students in a production of Life Is a Dream, a drama by Pedro Calderón de la Barca. Considered one of the greatest plays of the Spanish Golden Age, its themes have to do with the mutability of life and the illusory nature of the world.

Performances Feb. 22-24 and March 1-3

Hosted by Department of Theater and Performance Studies

MUSIC

ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY

The St. Louis Symphony – second oldest in the nation – is both venerable and forward-looking, with a broad musical range and diverse repertory. The Bing program includes Thomas Adès’ “Dances” from the opera Powder Her Face, Benjamin Britten’s Violin Concerto with Grammy-winning violinist Augustin Hadelich and Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 1. Under David Robertson, now in his 12th and final year as maestro, the orchestra has toured extensively in the United States and across the globe.

Concert Jan. 19

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

ST. OLAF CHOIR

The St. Olaf Choir, with 75 mixed voices, is the premier a cappella choir in the United States. For over a century, the choir has set a standard of choral excellence and remained at the forefront of choral artistry. Conducted since 1990 by Anton Armstrong, the St. Olaf Choir continues to develop the tradition that originated with its founder, F. Melius Christiansen.

Concert Feb. 7

Hosted by Office for Religious Life

MUSIC

STEW AND THE NEGRO PROBLEM

Singer-songwriter Stew pays homage to the art and activism of James Baldwin in Notes of a Native Song, an irreverent and spirited rock ’n’ roll song-cycle. With his band The Negro Problem, Stew – known for his 2008 Tony winner Passing Strange, developed on the Stanford campus – explores Baldwin’s trailblazing legacy with music, video and spoken word that captures the essence of the man who spoke uncomfortable truths about gender, race and class division.

Concerts Feb. 2-3

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

TAKÁCS QUARTET

Blessed with a nigh-otherworldly gift for chamber artistry, the Takács Quartet, in the latest of its highly anticipated visits to the Bing, partners with Canadian piano virtuoso MarcAndré Hamelin for the Dohnányi Piano Quintet No. 1. Beethoven’s Opus 131 Quartet and Schubert’s Quartettsatz are also on the program for this Boulder, Colorado–based quartet.

Concert Feb. 23

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

YUKO TANAKA

Yuko Tanaka, harpsichord, and John Dornenburg, viola da gamba, perform selected Pièces de viole suites by Marin Marais, as well as works by Johann Froberger in Memorial Church.

Concert Jan. 10

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

QUEENIE VAN DE ZANDT

In BLUE: The Songs of Joni Mitchell, Australian chanteuse Queenie van de Zandt, along with musical director Max Lambert and a live band, explore her love of all things Joni. Using voiceovers and intimate storytelling, van de Zandt affectionately reinterprets Mitchell’s melancholy music, revealing the stories behind some of her most haunting songs such as “A Case of You,” “Both Sides Now” and “Little Green.”

Concerts March 23-24

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

VOGLER QUARTET

Sultry German chanteuse Ute Lemper joins her countrymen the Vogler Quartet and clarinetist/pianist Stefan Malzew for a collection of songs that takes listeners on a journey through time via Europe and Argentina. Crossing national and stylistic boundaries alike, Paris Days, Berlin Nights present an extraordinary portrait of the cultural melting pot of 1920s Europe, featuring chansons of Édith Piaf, Kurt Weill, Hanns Eisler, Astor Piazzolla, Chava Alberstein and Jacques Brel.

Concert March 17

Hosted by Stanford Live

MUSIC

KENNY WASHINGTON

Michael Galisatus directs the Stanford Jazz Orchestra’s program, featuring guest Kenny Washington. A native of New Orleans, Washington grew up singing and performing gospel in church, developing a deep love for music at a very young age. He began performing with the school band, and later studied various styles of music ranging from traditional and contemporary jazz, classical, rhythm and blues, and pop at Xavier University. He performed and toured throughout the U.S., Asia, Russia and Australia with the U.S. Navy Band and then made his home in the San Francisco Bay Area, performing in jazz clubs and working with other well-known artists. With Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Stevie Wonder and Donny Hathaway among his influences, Kenny has a four-octave range, and his scatting is rapid-fire, passionate, melodious and inventive. His intonation is so precise that it becomes noticeable if the piano wasn’t tuned that day.

Concert March 7

Hosted by Associated Students of Stanford University, Department of Music

MUSIC

ZACHARY JAMES WATKINS

Oakland-based Zachary James Watkins performs an evening of solo music for guitar, electronics and devices. Watkins studied composition with Janice Giteck, Jarrad Powell, Robin Holcomb and Jovino Santos Neto at Cornish College. He earned an MFA in electronic music and recording media in 2006 from Mills College, where he studied with Chris Brown, Fred Frith, Alvin Curran and Pauline Oliveros. He has been an artist in residence at the Espy Foundation, Djerassi and the Headlands Center for the Arts.

Concert Jan. 31

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

MUSIC

JEREMY HUW WILLIAMS

The Shenson Recital Series presents Jeremy Huw Williams, baritone, and Paula Fan, piano, performing works by George Butterworth, William Walton, Claude Debussy, Grace Williams, Barbara Jazwinski and Paul Phillips. The Welsh baritone studied at St John’s College, Cambridge, at the National Opera Studio and with April Cantelo. He made his debut with the Welsh National Opera as Guglielmo (Così fan tutte) and has since appeared in 60 operatic roles. Before the Shenson Recital, he will give a masterclass to Stanford students

Masterclass March 5, concert March 7

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

ERIC WUBBELS

Composer/performers Weston Olencki and Eric Wubbels present two new works written by – and for – the duo: Olencki’s recasting (2016-18, premiere) for prepared piano, transducers, synthesizers, electronics and objects; and Wubbels’ contraposition (2016-17) for trombone and prepared piano. These works explore shared concerns of virtuosity, synchronization and hybridization using languages developed through intensive long-term collaboration and friendship.

Concert Jan. 13

Hosted by Department of Music, CCRMA

MUSIC

ZEPHYROS WINDS

Zyphyros Winds, one of America’s most distinguished chamber ensembles, conducts an afternoon masterclass for wind students followed by an evening program drawn from the wide spectrum of chamber music for winds: György​ ​Ligeti’s Six​ ​Bagatelles​ ​for​ ​Wind​ ​Quintet​ and Ten​ ​Pieces​ ​for​ ​Wind​ ​Quintet; Mozart’s Quintet​ ​in​ ​C​ ​Minor​; and Endre Szervánszky’s Fúvósötös​​–Wind ​Q​uintet.

Masterclass and concert Feb. 7

Hosted by Department of Music

MUSIC

ZURICH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Since its founding in 1945, the Zurich Chamber Orchestra has covered a lot of ground, performing on Baroque-style bows and traditional gut strings in recent years while also looking to the new in its performance of jazz and folk repertoire. Conducting from the violin, Daniel Hope, succeeding his countryman Sir Roger Norrington, leads the ensemble in an unusual pairing of The Four Seasons with minimalist composer Max Richter’s Recomposed, an exciting reimagining of Antonio Vivaldi’s Baroque classic.

Concert March 18

Hosted by Stanford Live