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Stanford News Service
October 31, 2022

MEDIA ADVISORY: Stanford experts on climate change attending COP27

Not for broadcast or publication.

Stanford’s delegates to the 27th Conference of the Parties of the UNFCCC (COP27) are available to comment before travel and during their time in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. For a schedule of their official speaking engagements visit our COP27 website.

For assistance in connecting with these COP27 attendees in Egypt between Nov. 9 and 13, contact Bodie Cabiyo, at bcabiyo@stanford.edu or (509) 733-8248 (mobile and WhatsApp).

Prior to Nov. 9, email sustainability_media@stanford.edu for assistance. Click on names below for more background.

Chris Field

Field’s research emphasizes field and laboratory studies of impacts of climate change, from the molecular to the global scale. From 2008 to 2015, Field was co-chair of Working Group II of the IPCC. He is the Perry L. McCarty Director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment; founding director of the Carnegie Institution for Science’s Department of Global Ecology; the Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies at Stanford’s School of Humanities and Sciences and the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability; and senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy.

Contact: cfield@stanford.edu, (650) 736-4352

Expertise: Climate change, including impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Global perspective crossing regions and sectors. Special expertise on ecosystems and agriculture.

Arun Majumdar

Majumdar is the inaugural Dean of the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability. He is a former division director for environmental energy technologies at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, founding director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), acting under secretary of energy, vice president for energy at Google, and co-director of the Precourt Institute for Energy. Majumdar is the Jay Precourt Professor at Stanford and a senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy.

Contact: amajumdar@stanford.edu, (650) 725-4016

Expertise: As founding director of the Department of Energy’s ARPA-E program, he can discuss the role of clean-energy technologies in shaping U.S. and global climate and energy policy, as well as energy in the developing world.

Felicia Marcus

Marcus is the William C. Landreth Visiting Fellow at Stanford University’s Water in the West Program, an attorney, consultant, and member of the Water Policy Group. She most recently served as chair of the California State Water Resources Control Board, implementing laws regarding drinking water and water quality and state’s water rights, hearing regional board water quality appeals, settling disputes, and providing financial assistance to communities to upgrade water infrastructure.

Contact: Felicia.Marcus@stanford.edu

Expertise: Water policy, drought.

Kari Nadeau

Nadeau is the director of the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford University, section chief of Allergy and Asthma at the Stanford School of Medicine, and the Naddisy Foundation Professor of Pediatric Food Allergy, Immunology, and Asthma at Stanford University. Nadeau is one of the nation’s foremost experts in adult and pediatric allergy and asthma and holds an MD and PhD from Harvard Medical School. Her work includes investigating the impact of prescribed burns versus wildfires on the immune and cardiovascular systems of children.

Contact: knadeau@stanford.edu, (650) 724-6780

Expertise: Health effects of wildfire smoke, climate change impacts on allergies and respiratory illness.

Josheena Naggea

Naggea is an interdisciplinary scientist whose work focuses on centering blue justice and equity for ocean innovations in small-scale fisheries and aquaculture. Her community-engaged research has focused on climate adaptation, disaster impacts and recovery, marine protected area management, and the valorization of natural and cultural heritage in ocean governance. She has a keen interest in understanding people-ocean connections and how that influences coastal livelihoods, local environmental stewardship, and food security. 

Expertise: Sustainable ocean economies, small-scale fisheries, ocean equity, local environmental stewardship, climate adaptation

Contact: jnaggea@stanford.edu+16504077456

Michelle Tigchelaar

Tigchelaar is an interdisciplinary scientist whose work focuses on the impacts of climate change on food systems, spanning the aquatic and terrestrial and the ecological and human. Her active research involves developing tools for assessing blue-green climate risk, and identifying climate impacts and adaptations for food worker health. Tigchelaar is currently a research scientist with the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions where she coordinates the Blue Food Assessment, a coalition of international researchers working to produce an integrative assessment of the role of aquatic foods (food from marine and freshwater systems) in transformations towards healthy, sustainable and just food systems.

Contact: mtigch@stanford.edu, (808) 724-1392

Expertise: Sustainable food systems, oceans.

Additional Stanford experts on climate change

(Available on Pacific Time)

For assistance in locating these faculty members, contact

Carbon Accounting

Rob Jackson

Jackson studies the effects of climate change and droughts on forest mortality and grassland ecosystems. He chairs the Global Carbon Project, which compiles data on fossil fuel emissions and deforestation, and previously chaired the Department of Energy’s National Institute for Climate Change Research in the southeastern U.S. His recent work has focused on what window of time is left to limit warming to below 2 degrees Celsius. Jackson is the Michelle and Kevin Douglas Provostial Professor at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability; senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment; and senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy.

Contact: rob.jackson@stanford.edu, (650) 497-5841

Expertise: Climate change, drought, land use, full life-cycle carbon accounting, effects of climate and drought on forest mortality, fracking, and drinking water quality, and urban natural gas leaks.

Alicia Seiger

Seiger is a lecturer at Stanford Law School and leads sustainability and energy finance initiatives at Stanford Law, Graduate School of Business, and the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability. She has served as an advisor to the Governors of California and New York, the New York State Comptroller, and numerous pension fund, endowment, and family office CIOs on the topics of climate risk, opportunity, and resiliency. Her first book, “Settling Climate Accounts: Navigating the Road to Net Zero” considers the rise of carbon accounting in the context of the last three decades of global climate action, examines the rough edges of Net Zero in practice, and makes recommendations for the road ahead.

Contact: aseiger@stanford.edu, (415) 215-0716

Expertise: Carbon accounting, climate risk and disclosure, climate finance, carbon credits, carbon markets, blended finance, ESG, innovation, climate policy, venture capital, and climate philanthropy.

Freshwater and Drought

Noah Diffenbaugh

Diffenbaugh studies the climate system, including the processes by which climate change could increase extreme weather events such as drought and impact agriculture, water resources, and human health. He has served as a lead author for Working Group II of the IPCC and has provided testimony and scientific expertise to the White House, the Governor of California, and U.S. congressional offices. Diffenbaugh is the Kara J Foundation Professor of Earth System Science at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability and the Kimmelman Family Senior Fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact: diffenbaugh@stanford.edu, (650) 223-9425

Expertise: The climate system, including the processes by which climate change could impact agriculture, water resources, extreme weather events, and human health.

Conservation

Jim Leape

A 30-year veteran of conservation work on every continent, Leape is the former director of WWF International and leader of the global WWF Network, one of the world’s largest conservation organizations. Leape is the co-director of the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions and the William and Eva Price Senior Fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact: jleape@stanford.edu, (650) 498-0916

Expertise: Climate change, conservation, and natural resource management; Chinese environmental policy, forest protection, marine conservation, water resources management, and sustainability in global commodity markets.

Economics

Charles Kolstad

Kolstad is an internationally known environmental economist with a focus on environmental economics, climate change, and energy. He has been a convening lead author for the IPCC (economics and ethics). His research interests are in information, uncertainty, and regulation, with much of his applied work in the area of climate change and energy markets. He is a professor, by courtesy, of economics; senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy; senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment; and a senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.

Contact: ckolstad@stanford.edu, (805) 699-6899

Expertise: Economics of greenhouse-gas mitigation, adaptation, and regulation, risk and uncertainty, international agreements, and decarbonization policies.

Marshall Burke

Burke’s research focuses on social and economic impacts of climate change. He has recently published on the past and future global economic impacts of climate change, and on the relationship between high temperatures and human conflict, including armed violence and civil wars. Ongoing work estimates the magnitude of loss and damage estimates potentially owed by large emitters. Burke is the Deputy Director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment; an associate professor of Global Environmental Policy at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability; a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact: mburke@stanford.edu, (650) 721-2203

Expertise: Food security, climate change, economic development.

Energy

Mark Z. Jacobson

Jacobson’s research focuses on understanding air pollution and global warming and developing large-scale clean, renewable energy solutions. He has developed and applied three-dimensional atmosphere-biosphere-ocean computer models to simulate air pollution, weather, climate, and renewable energy. He has also developed roadmaps to transition countries, states, cities, and towns to 100% clean, renewable energy and computer models to examine grid stability in the presence of high penetrations of renewable energy. His work forms the scientific basis for the energy portion of the U.S. Green New Deal. Jacobson is a professor of civil and environmental engineering in Stanford’s School of Engineering; director of Stanford’s Atmosphere/Energy program; a senior fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy; and a senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact: Jacobson@stanford.edu, (650) 723-6836

Expertise: Renewable energy, atmospheric science.

Environmental Law

Michael Wara

Wara’s research focuses on climate policy and regulation, both domestically and internationally. His current scholarship addresses the performance of the emerging global market for greenhouse gases and mechanisms for reducing emissions, especially in developing countries after the expiration of the Kyoto Protocol. Wara is the director of the Climate and Energy Research Program and senior research scholar at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment; a research fellow at the Program in Energy and Sustainable Development in Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies; and a research fellow at the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance.

Contact: michael.wara@stanford.edu

Expertise: Environmental and energy law and policy.

Food Security

David Lobell

Lobell was a lead author for Chapter 7, Food Production Systems and Food Security, of the report issued in March 2014 by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group II. His research focuses on identifying opportunities to raise crop yields in major agricultural regions, with a particular emphasis on adaptation to climate change. He is the Gloria and Richard Kushel Director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment; a professor of Earth System Science at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability; and William Wrigley Senior Fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

Contact: dlobell@stanford.edu, (650) 721-6207

Expertise: Food security, crop yields, and climate change.

IPCC Processes, Climate Resilience, and Adaptation

Michael Mastrandrea

Mastrandrea is an interdisciplinary scientist whose work focuses on climate risks and resilience and the design and implementation of energy and climate policy. He helped lead development of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and has also served as an author for the Fourth U.S. National Climate Assessment and as an associate editor for California’s Fourth Climate Change Assessment. He is the research director of the Climate and Energy Policy Program and a senior research scholar at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. He also serves as Chief Advisor for Energy and Climate Research at the California Energy Commission.

Contact: mikemas@stanford.edu, (650) 224-2070

Expertise: Climate change risks and resilience, climate, and energy policy implementation, scientific assessment.

Jenny Suckale

Suckale focuses on understanding disaster risk and resilience by exploring the processes that govern extreme events in different natural systems and working with private and public partners to increase community resilience using a scientific co-production approach. She leads the Stanford Future Bay Initiative, a partnership committed to co-production of actionable intelligence to shape a more equitable, resilient, and sustainable urban future for Bay Area communities. Her group’s research priorities span natural climate hazards, such as ice-sheet instability and permafrost disintegration, and hazards that arise from the interaction between natural processes and human interventions, such as flooding in urban areas and induced earthquakes. Suckale is an assistant professor of geophysics at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability; assistant professor, by courtesy, of civil and environmental engineering; and center fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact: jsuckale@stanford.edu, (650) 497-6456

Expertise: Climate hazards, community impacts and resilience, physical processes of extreme events.

Oceans

Stephen Palumbi

Palumbi is an internationally recognized expert on climate change impacts on marine life. His current work focuses on how coral reefs can adapt to climate change and the genetics of marine reserves designed for conservation and fisheries enhancement, with projects in the Philippines, Bahamas, and U.S. West Coast. Palumbi is the Jane and Marshall Steel Jr. Professor of Marine Sciences at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability, and an affiliate of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact: spalumbi@stanford.edu, (831) 655-6210

Expertise: Climate change and ocean acidification.

Psychology and Human Behavior

Gabrielle Wong-Parodi

Wong-Parodi is a psychologist who applies social, behavioral, and decision science approaches to understand how people react and are affected by global environmental change in order to develop interventions to improve adaptive capacity and resiliency. Her recent work has focused on the impacts of natural hazards and extreme events on individuals and communities coping with hurricanes and floods. Wong-Parodi is an assistant professor of Earth System Science at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability and a center fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact: gwongpar@stanford.edu, (650) 725-6457

Expertise: Natural disaster psychological and behavioral impacts, climate risk, and adaptation

Sea-Level Rise, Ice Sheets, and Glaciers

Dustin Schroeder

Schroeder’s research focuses on the subsurface processes and conditions that govern the stability of continental ice sheets, such as Antarctica, and their contribution to the rate of sea-level rise. Schroeder uses airborne ice-penetrating radar to measure the thickness of ice sheets, bed conditions underneath glaciers, and ice melt from underneath the glacial surface. Schroeder is an associate professor of geophysics at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability and a senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment.

Contact: Dustin.M.Schroeder@stanford.edu, (650) 725-7861

Expertise: Sea-level rise, ice sheets, Antarctica, Greenland, glaciers.

Additional Stanford climate experts can be found at

https://news.stanford.edu/expertise/climate-change/

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