Archive for the ‘Awards’ Category

Laurette Beeson wins Fidler Award for contributions to Stanford Student Affairs

May 28th, 2014
Laurette Beeson Photo Laurette Beeson (Photo: Joy Leighton/Student Affairs)

Laurette Beeson won the 2014 Margaret Ann Fidler Award.  Photo Laurette Beeson (Photo: Joy Leighton/Student Affairs)

The nameplate had just been sealed onto her plaque for the Amy J. Blue Award when LAURETTE BEESON learned that she had received another honor last week.

On Tuesday, May 20, Beeson, an assistant dean for graduate life, was awarded the Margaret Ann Fidler Award for Distinguished Service in Student Affairs. The highest honor given in the Division of Student Affairs, the Fidler award honors a staff member who demonstrates an extraordinary dedication to the division and the mission of the university.

Established in 2000 in honor of MARGARET ANN FIDLER, a former associate vice provost for student affairs, the award recognizes individuals who demonstrate extraordinary integrity and a commitment to teamwork.

Each year, the award is a well-guarded secret until it is announced at a May meeting.

Beeson was very surprised when her name was announced by Fidler, who was on hand to personally give the award. KEN HSU, assistant vice provost for student affairs, was sitting at the table with Beeson and said he could not look at her for fear that she would realize she was this year’s honoree.

The awards committee selected Beeson for nearly 25 years of dedicated service in Student Affairs, “continually demonstrating her commitment, collaboration, patience, flexibility, compassion, respect and results,” the citation read.

“These are the tenets of what Laurette continues to demonstrate as she performs her duties and contributes to her many campus engagements with graduate students, undergraduate students, faculty, staff, parents and others. That there is nothing she will not offer to assist with, no task that is too complicated or difficult for her to tackle, and no topic that she will shy away from for the benefit of the Stanford community, was also one of the main factors in her selection for this award,” the citation continued.

— BY ELAINE RAY

 

Graduating senior Kaela Farrise receives Stanford Alumni Association’s Outstanding Achievement Award

May 28th, 2014

dish_kaelaKAELA FARRISE, ‘14 has received the Stanford Alumni Association’s Outstanding Achievement Award for making a significant impact on the campus community.

HOWARD WOLF, vice president for alumni affairs and president of the Stanford Alumni Association, announced the award at a private reception on Friday, May 23.

Farrise has been actively engaged in the Stanford community from the moment she arrived on campus. She has served as a member of the executive cabinet of Associated Students; a leader in the Black Student Union;  chair of the Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education Student Advisory Board and is currently a member of the Senior Gift Committee. One of her nominators described her as “a distinctly talented and motivated young scholar. She is also an activist who combines an unwavering commitment to social justice with exemplary leadership abilities. She is a mature, caring young lady who is organized, dependable, easy to get along with and is committed to being a leader among today’s students.”

The Outstanding Achievement Award was created in 2011 to honor up to three members of the graduating class who have made a significant or unique impact on the Stanford community.

The Stanford Alumni Association also announced the winners of the Class of 2014 Award of Excellence, which recognizes graduating seniors whose undergraduate activities demonstrate the strong potential for continued service to the university and the alumni community. Nominations were submitted by faculty and staff from across campus. This year 150 members of the Class of ’14 received the award and were honored at a reception at the Alumni Association on May 15. Their names will also be listed in the program for the Class Day Lecture, which is hosted by the Alumni Association and takes place during Commencement Weekend.

— BY CARA HANELIN, Stanford Alumni Association

Stanford Professor Jon Krosnick wins lifetime achievement award from public opinion research group

May 27th, 2014
Jon Krosnick

Jon Krosnick

The final tally is in.  JON KROSNICK, a Stanford professor of communication and of political science and, by courtesy, of psychology, has won the 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award by the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR). Bestowed upon Krosnick on May 17 at the association’s annual banquet in Anaheim, Calif., the tribute recognizes outstanding contributions to public opinion research.

The award plaque describes Krosnick as an “academic polymath with a restless intellect and boundless energy” whose scholarship is elite and groundbreaking. According to the AAPOR, “His work during the past three decades has produced essential insights into questionnaire design and survey research methods.”

Krosnick’s career has been devoted to understanding and improving survey research. His focus on accuracy is aimed at making policymakers educated consumers of available data. In particular, AAPOR states, his 15-year exploration of public attitudes on climate change has been “path-breaking and influential.”

Krosnick later described the award banquet as a “bear hug” by a peer group that he considers family. “I am stunned by this award because it is profoundly meaningful to me,” he said. The survey researchers that fill the ranks of AAPOR are “my go-to people,” said Krosnick, who is the director of the Political Psychology Research Group.

“AAPOR has inspired me, validated me, nurtured me and taught me,” he added.

For Krosnick, it has been both a meaningful and challenging career. “Doing the above has not always been popular, and the process has involved its share of frustrations and disappointments.”

GARY LANGER, who served on the award committee, said Krosnick’s contributions to survey research were “unparalleled.”

“By my lights, he’s the most imaginative, most ethical, widest ranging, deepest thinking and hardest working survey researcher of our times,” said Langer, president of Langer Research Associates and former longtime director of polling at ABC.Krosnick, in his acceptance speech, applauded a “big team of collaborators” over the years.

“The most important of these have been the super-talented students I’ve been able to work with: graduate students, undergrads and postdocs here at Stanford. I am deeply thankful to Stanford for giving me the opportunity to work with such great people and to provide such a supportive and vibrant intellectual environment,” he said.

Krosnick is the author of six books and more than 150 articles and chapters. He has also conducted surveys on voter decision-making, passionate attachment to political issues, the influence of the news media, Americans’ attitudes toward climate change and the environment, and many other topics.

Krosnick graduated from Harvard University in 1980 with a BA in psychology. He received both an MA in 1983 and a PhD in social psychology in 1986 from the University of Michigan, and came to work at Stanford in 2004.

A native of Philadelphia with a mother who was an opera singer and a father who was an opera aficionado, he learned to play piano at age 6 and continued playing percussion instruments from elementary school on. Today he is a drummer in the electric jazz band Charged Particles.

 

—CLIFTON B. PARKER

Stanford Professor Jo Boaler wins math education prize

May 22nd, 2014
Jo Boaler

Jo Boaler

JO BOALER, professor of mathematics education at Stanford Graduate School of Education, has been awarded the Kay Gilliland Equity Award  by the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM).

The international organization, made up of leaders in the field of mathematics education, cited Boaler for her contributions to equity in mathematics education and leadership in attacking current problems in mathematics curriculum and supervision. Her work examines how traditional math instruction methods, which emphasize drilling and memorization, deter many students from excelling in the field. Known for her efforts to champion more collaborative approaches, she gave a presentation at the organization’s recent annual meeting titled, “Cutting through the smoke screen: Erasing mathematics inequality through research and action.”

According to the NCSM website, the award was established in 2013 to honor Kay Gilliland, a California math teacher who served as the group’s president and was a founding member of the professional development program, EQUALS, at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley. Boaler, the author of seven books including What’s Math Got To Do With It? and The Elephant in the Classroom, has started offering courses online to present more interactive and hands-on approaches to teaching and learning mathematics. In addition to offering an online course for teachers and parents, she is also preparing to offer an online course for students called “How to Learn Math: For Students.”

Read the original story on the Stanford Graduate School of Education’s website.

 

 

Rodgers wins Ben Hogan Award as the best colleagiate golfer

May 21st, 2014
Patrick Rodgers

Stanford golfer Patrick Rodgers

Junior PATRICK RODGERS has been named winner of the 2014 Ben Hogan Award by the Colonial Country Club, the Friends of Golf and the Golf Coaches Association of America.

The Ben Hogan Award is presented annually to the top men’s NCAA Division I, II or III, NAIA or NJCAA college golfer, taking into account all collegiate and amateur competitions during the 12-month period dating from the previous award’s banquet. The Ben Hogan Award selection committee is made up of 24 leaders and experts in amateur, college and professional golf.

The first honoree in Stanford history, Rodgers is the world’s top-ranked amateur golfer, according to both the World Amateur Golf Ranking and the Scratch Players World Amateur Ranking. Teammate CAMERON WILSON was a finalist for the award.

In 11 tournaments this year, Rodgers, the Pac-12 Player of the Year, boasts nine top-10 finishes and a stroke average of 69.41. On the amateur circuit, he was a member of the winning United States Walker Cup and Palmer Cup teams in 2013 and finished with a 5-1-2 record. Last summer, he was the medalist at the Western Amateur and reached the round of 16 in match play at both the Western Amateur and the United States Amateur. In addition, he tied for 15th place at the PGA Tour’s John Deere Classic last July.

Visit the GoStanford website to learn more and to watch a video in which Rodgers offers a few tips for succeeding on the challenging Stanford Golf Course.

Stanford graduating seniors Hunter Kodama, Chiney Ogwumike, win Alumni Association’s Sterling Award

May 16th, 2014
Howard Wolf, director of the Stanford Alumni Association with Hunter Kodama, '14, a 2014 Sterling Award winner.

Howard Wolf, president of the Stanford Alumni Association, with Hunter Kodama, ’14, a 2014 Sterling Award winner. He shared the award with Chiney Ogwumike ’14.

Graduating seniors HUNTER KODAMA and CHINEY OGWUIMKE have received the Stanford Alumni Association’s 2014 J.E. Wallace Sterling Award for outstanding service to Stanford.
HOWARD WOLF, president of the Alumni Association and vice president for alumni affairs, presented the awards at the SAA Board Meeting on Thursday, May 15.
Kodama, who will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in public policy, has been actively involved in campus life. He was a Junior Class President, a Freshman Transition Coordinator, a four-year member of the Dance Marathon planning team, the 2014 Associated Students elections commissioner and is currently a Senior Gift co-chair.
“He’s both an individualist and entrepreneurial. He is the definition of what it is to be a student leader at Stanford,” one of his nominators wrote. Other references commented on his warmth and humility, compassion, work ethic, genuine nature and enthusiasm for Stanford.
The Sterling Award cites Hunter“…For the deep level of respect and trust afforded him by his classmates, due not only to the countless ways he has served them and his university, but also to the gracious sincerity and generous spirit he brought to this work.
Ogwumike, who will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in international relations, has been a stand-out student-athlete. She was a member of the varsity women’s basketball team for four years and received numerous honors on the conference and national levels. She was a captain of the team for two years, a member and committee co-chair of the Cardinal Council and was  an active participant in community volunteer engagements. She was the driving force behind Nerd Nation.
One of her nominators described some of the ways in which Chiney is a stand-out leader: “Chiney has a magnetic personality that makes people want to be around her.  Not only does she have high standards for herself, but also she helps make others around her better.  She is selfless, encouraging, motivating, inspiring and most of all, a person with unquestioned integrity.”
The Sterling Award cites Chiney for being an “incredible role model to young girls,” and “for teaching us all that life is about playing hard, working hard….And for saying with unmitigated love and pride ‘I am Stanford!’ while everyone everywhere agrees unanimously, ‘Yes, you are Stanford.’”
Ogwumike was unable to attend the May 15 dinner becasue she is busy training with the Connecticut Sun, the WNBA team that selected her as the Number One draft pick in April.
The Alumni Association presents the Sterling Award annually to a graduating senior whose undergraduate activities have made an impact on campus and who demonstrates the strong potential for continued service to the university and the alumni community. This is the first time since 1999 that the award has been presented to two seniors.
The award is named for the late J.E. Wallace Sterling, who served as Stanford’s president from 1949 to 1968.

 — BY CARA HANELIN, Stanford Alumni Association

Julie Kennedy wins award for excellence in teaching

May 15th, 2014
Julie Kennedy

Julie Kennedy (Photo: Linda A. Cicero)

Environmental Earth System Science professor JULIE KENNEDY has been awarded the 2014 Excellence in Teaching Award by the Northern California Association of Phi Beta Kappa. She is one of four teachers honored this year and the 12th Stanford professor to win the award.

Kennedy said that while she is delighted to be honored, it is the nomination by a former student that she finds to be most gratifying.

“The deepest honor is to have been nominated, to have a student say that what you did, the way you put yourself out there as a teacher and as a friend really mattered to me, and I want others to know about it,” she said. “That’s what really hits my heart.”

On its website, Phi Beta Kappa states that winners of the award “are those who have taught an especially memorable course, or who have had a special impact on the education, career, life, or who have been found inspiring or particularly admirable by a PBK member.”

ROSS FEEHAN, a Phi Beta Kappa member and a Stanford alumnus (2013, B.S. and M.S. in Earth Systems), said he nominated Kennedy for the teaching award because of her deep impact on him as a teacher, benefactor and mentor. “Julie is irreplaceable,” Feehan said. “The talent, vigor and commitment she brings to each of her roles at Stanford are astounding.”

As part of his senior seminar, Feehan worked with Kennedy to help a nonprofit organization in East Palo Alto build a sustainable business model for a farmer’s market in the city. “Julie became intimately involved in the project to ensure that it was mutually beneficial for the organization and my group,” Feehan said. “She attended our off-campus, 8 a.m. meetings and encouraged the students to recognize the complexity of challenges.”

Kennedy, who is also a co-director of the Haas Center for Public Service and a senior fellow at Stanford’s Woods Institute for the Environment, said that as a teacher, she doesn’t try to pull her students into her world.

“I try to meet them where they are and then ask ‘How am I going to help you become the best and most effective version of you that you can become?’” she said. “The steps we take toward figuring that out are not a quarter-long adventure, it’s a years-long adventure together.”

 — BY KER THAN,  associate director of communications for the School of Earth Sciences

 

Steven Chu, Stanford Nobel physicist, former U. S. energy secretary, elected to Royal Society

May 14th, 2014
Steven Chu (Photo: U.S. Department of Energy)

Steven Chu (Photo: U.S. Department of Energy)

Physicist STEVEN CHU, Stanford professor and Nobel laureate, has been elected as a foreign member of the Fellowship of the Royal Society, one of the world’s most prominent groups of scientists.

Chu is the William R. Kenan Jr. Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences. He is a professor of physics and of molecular and cellular physiology. The Royal Society is the world’s oldest scientific academy in continuous existence, and is made up of the most eminent scientists, engineers and technologists from the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth. Past fellows and foreign members have included Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein.

Outstanding scientists, including pioneers in molecular biology, biomedicine and solar cell technology, make up the 50 new fellows and 10 new foreign members announced by the Royal Society. Chu shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in physics for the development of methods to use lasers to cool and trap atoms. From January 2009 to April 2013 he was the 12th U.S. Secretary of Energy under President Barack Obama and has sought new solutions to energy and climate challenges throughout his career.

During his first turn as a professor of physics and applied physics at Stanford, Chu helped launch the Stanford Bio-X program and the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology. Now, Chu plans to engage students and faculty from across campus to develop ways to facilitate addressing the country’s energy problems, with a focus on new pathways to sustainable, carbon dioxide-neutral energy. The Chu Group will also continue its efforts in applying new biophysical techniques to the study of biological systems, with an eye toward disease research.

BY BJORN CAREY

Three Stanford alums are national finalists for 2014 Student Academy Awards for their thesis films

May 13th, 2014

Three of the 35 films selected as national finalists in the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ 41st Student Academy Awards competition are from Stanford students in the MFA in Documentary Film and Video class of 2013.

LESLIE TAI is a finalist in the alternative category for The Private Life of Fenfen, a documentary film experiment in which a feisty young Chinese migrant worker’s tragic love story is broadcast to migrant workers across China. In the documentary category, finalists are HELEN HOOD SCHEER for The Apothecary, about the sole pharmacist in a 4,000 square mile region in the American Southwest and the profound divide between his public and private life, and J. CHRISTIAN JENSEN for White Earth, a winter portrait of North Dakota’s oil boom seen through unexpected eyes.

“These three 2013 thesis films are contributing to a proud tradition,” said JAN KRAWITZ, professor and director of the MFA program in documentary film and video. “The Stanford graduate program has garnered more Student Academy Awards in the documentary category than any other school. In 2011, two MFA thesis films were awarded a bronze and a silver medal. We hope that the documentaries produced by Christian, Helen, and Leslie will achieve the same degree of recognition.”

It was gratifying for Jensen to see his name listed among all the nominees, but he said that moment was made even sweeter when he saw the names of his two good friends Leslie and Helen listed as well. “The MFA documentary program only graduates seven to eight students a year so we become very close. These nominations are definitely a testament to the quality of Stanford’s program that really puts you and your films through the refiner’s fire over the course of two unforgettable years.”

Scheer said, “It’s an honor to be selected as a national finalist, regardless of whether we win or not. It will likely help us get into more film festivals, share our work with broader audiences, and stand out a bit more on the job market. I came to Stanford’s documentary program hoping to gain more fluency in dealing with complex storytelling and I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to do so.”

Per the Academy’s press release, the Student Academy Awards were established in 1972 to support and encourage excellence in filmmaking at the collegiate level. Past Student Academy Award® winners have gone on to receive 46 Oscar® nominations and have won or shared eight awards. They include JOHN LASSETER, PETE DOCTER, ROBERT ZEMECKIS, TREY PARKER and SPIKE LEE.

Academy members will now vote to determine up to three winning films in each category. The winners, but not their medal placements, will be announced later this month. The winning students will be brought to Los Angeles for a week of industry activities and social events that will culminate in the awards ceremony on Saturday, June 7, in Hollywood, at which time the gold, silver and bronze medalists will be revealed.

White Earth — [Trailer] from J. Christian Jensen on Vimeo.

The Private Life of Fenfen (Trailer) from Leslie Tai on Vimeo.

— BY ROBIN WANDER

Stanford University recognized for contributions to U.S.-China relations

May 8th, 2014
Stanford University President John Hennessy (center) during the Committee of 100 gala in San Francisco

Stanford President John Hennessy, center, during the Committee of 100 gala in San Francisco in April. (Photo courtesy Committee of 100)

The Committee of 100, an international organization dedicated to making cultural connections between the United States and Asia, honored Stanford University with its Common Ground Award for the Advancement in U.S.-China Relation

During a recent gala in San Francisco, Stanford President JOHN HENNESSY accepted the award, which recognized Stanford’s contributions and commitment to fostering U.S.-China relations over time.

As President Hennessy noted, Stanford has engaged in scientific and academic exchanges with Chinese colleagues over many years. Recently, the Stanford Center at Peking University has played a role in forging these relations. Administered by the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), the research and education center in Beijing has become the headquarters for Stanford students and faculty conducting research or organizing events in China.

The gala featured a video about the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project, as an example of how Stanford research is bridging a historical divide in Chinese and American relations.

Led by two Stanford professors, more than 100 scholars in North America and Asia are searching for information – seeking out descendents and traversing archives and museums – about the thousands of Chinese migrants who labored on the Transcontinental Railroad. The rail line helped shape the American West and culminated with Leland Stanford driving the Golden Spike at its completion on May 10, 1869.

“Chinese workers were here on [Leland Stanford's Palo Alto Stock] Farm and then the university as workers from the beginning,” says GORDON CHANG, the project’s co-director.

Recognition by an organization like the Committee of 100, Chang says, emphasizes the importance and timeliness of a project such as the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America. He believes the project “has hit a chord here and in China. Chinese workers labored to complete one of the iconic projects of America, yet we know so very little about them and they have never been given their due.”

The award also acknowledges that the United States and China have been intertwined for over 150 years, says English Professor SHELLEY FISHER FISHKIN, co-director on the project and director of the Program in American Studies. “Recognizing our shared past can be an important step in forging a positive future for U.S.-China relations.”

—VERONICA MARIAN, the Humanities at Stanford