Stanford scholars named among most influential in education public policy

The American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., put the spotlight on 200 influential scholars it said did the most to shape educational practice and policy in the past year.

Stanford  scholars recognized by the AEI survey  came from a wide range of units and schools, including the Hoover Institution, the Graduate School of Education, the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR), the Department of Political Science, the Department of Psychology and the Department of Economics.

Stanford
Credit: Linda A. Cicero / Stanford News Service

The Stanford researchers delved into varied areas of education, producing research on charter schools, financial aid in higher education, teacher performance, achievement gaps and more. They also spoke at conferences, taught at educator workshops, penned op-eds and met with policymakers.

The survey was compiled by a committee headed by Rick Hess, director of education policy studies at AEI. Scholars are nominated for the recognition and the committee reviews each nominee working with metrics that center on the nominee’s academic body of work and public impact – including mentions in the media and the Congressional Record. AEI started annually recognizing education policy scholars in 2010.

The survey, Hess wrote in Education Week, was “designed to acknowledge scholars who are actively engaged in public discourse and whose work has an impact on practice and policy.”

“For a scholar to be included, education must constitute a substantial slice of their scholarship,” Hess adds.

The Stanford scholars recognized include ERIC BETTINGER, professor of education; JO BOALER, professor of education; MARTIN CARNOY, professor of education; RAJ CHETTY, professor of economics and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR); LARRY CUBAN, professor emeritus of education; LINDA DARLING-HAMMOND, professor emerita of education; THOMAS S. DEE, professor of education and senior fellow at SIEPR; ERIC HANUSHEK, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution; CAROLINE M. HOXBY, professor of economics and senior fellow at SIEPR; MICHAEL KIRST, professor emeritus of education; DAVID F. LABAREE, professor of education; SUSANNA LOEB, professor of education and senior fellow at SIEPR; BRUCE MCCANDLISS, professor of education; TERRY M. MOE, professor of political science and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution; NEL NODDINGS, professor emerita of education; MARGARET RAYMOND, research fellow at the Hoover Institution; SEAN F. REARDON, professor of education and senior fellow at SIEPR; ROB REICH, professor of political science; CLAUDE STEELE, professor emeritus of psychology; and SAM WINEBURG, professor of education.