Stanford junior receives Shultz fellowship for research on Israel

Stanford junior Yisroel Quint with former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz. (Photo credit: Hillel@Stanford) George Shultz
Stanford junior Yisroel Quint with former U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz. (Photo credit: Hillel@Stanford) George Shultz

Hillel@Stanford has awarded Stanford junior YISROEL QUINT the George and Charlotte Shultz Fellowship in Modern Israel Studies.

Quint, a junior from New York, who is majoring in Slavic languages and literatures, will use his fellowship to support research on Israel’s 2006 disengagement from the Gaza Strip.

The fellowship was established five years ago in honor of former U.S. Secretary of State GEORGE SHULTZ and his wife, CHARLOTTE, by New York Times columnist THOMAS FRIEDMAN and his wife, ANN, a Stanford alumna. It provides a monetary award to support a two- to four-week research trip to Israel, including travel, accommodations and amenities. Shultz, a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, has matched the original gift.

Quint’s proposed research will focus on why the three main actors in the disengagement – Israel, the Palestinian Authority and the United States – failed to prevent Hamas from taking over the Gaza Strip. Specifically, he will focus on the elections in the Palestinian Territories in 2006, the sanctions and economic boycott of the Gaza Strip and the Battle for Gaza in June 2007. His fellowship research will support his senior thesis.

“My primary aim is to meet with the Israeli politicians, military people, academics and journalists covering Gaza to get their views on exactly what happened after the disengagement,” Quint said. “I would not have been able to go to Israel and meet with these leaders without this fellowship.”

The award, which is open to Stanford students in all fields with an interest in conducting research on issues related to modern Israel, encourages applications from those of all backgrounds and religions and in all disciplines. Students must have attended Stanford for a minimum of two years, currently be enrolled at Stanford and complete a cohesive research project to be presented on campus at the conclusion of the research term.

“We are deeply grateful to the Friedmans and the Shultzes for their generosity, and for helping Hillel@Stanford to encourage student travel to Israel to advance scholarly pursuits,” said Rabbi SERENA EISENBERG, executive director of Hillel@Stanford.