Sociology

How gangs use social media

Stanford sociologist Forrest Stuart examines how gang-associated youth on Chicago’s South Side use social media to challenge rivals. He finds that, contrary to common belief, most of these confrontations do not escalate to offline violence and, in some instances, deter it.

What happens to claim-prone physicians?

Stanford researchers find that physicians with poor malpractice liability records are no more likely than physicians who did not experience claims to relocate for a fresh start elsewhere.

How violent protest can backfire

When a protest group with strong public support turns violent, people may perceive them as less reasonable. In turn, this leads people to identify with them less, and ultimately become less supportive, according to a new study by Stanford sociologist Robb Willer.

People plan because it makes them feel free

People’s ability to make rational plans is essential to their sense of personal freedom and autonomy, according to new research from philosophy Professor Michael Bratman.

Why women stay behind the scenes at work

Avoiding backlash, feeling authentic and balancing work with family responsibilities are reasons women shared with Stanford researchers about why they opt to work on the sidelines.

War, clan structure explain odd biological event

Undergraduates Tian Chen Zeng and Alan Aw worked with Marcus Feldman, a professor of biology, to show how social structure could explain a genetic puzzle about humans of the Stone Age.

New approach to reducing gender inequality at work

A new approach for reducing gender inequality in the workplace has shown promise in a pilot project at several companies. It combines existing tools and adds an evaluation of places where biases could creep in to a company’s procedures.