Sociology

People plan because it makes them feel free

People’s ability to make rational plans is essential to their sense of personal freedom and autonomy, according to new research from philosophy Professor Michael Bratman.

Why women stay behind the scenes at work

Avoiding backlash, feeling authentic and balancing work with family responsibilities are reasons women shared with Stanford researchers about why they opt to work on the sidelines.

War, clan structure explain odd biological event

Undergraduates Tian Chen Zeng and Alan Aw worked with Marcus Feldman, a professor of biology, to show how social structure could explain a genetic puzzle about humans of the Stone Age.

New approach to reducing gender inequality at work

A new approach for reducing gender inequality in the workplace has shown promise in a pilot project at several companies. It combines existing tools and adds an evaluation of places where biases could creep in to a company’s procedures.

Reputation can offset social bias

In a study involving nearly 9,000 Airbnb users, Stanford scholars propose that implementing features that emphasize a user’s reputation can offset harmful social bias.

Stanford sociologist flips assimilation formula

In his new book, sociologist Tomás Jiménez turns the conventional analysis of assimilation on its head and dissects the phenomenon from the perspective of Silicon Valley’s established population.