Food and agriculture

News articles classified as Food and agriculture

Pollution and crops

New analysis shows crop yields could increase by about 25% in China and up to 10% in other parts of the world if emissions of a common air pollutant decreased by about half.

Mapping risks of labor abuse and illegal fishing

A new modeling approach combines machine learning and human insights to map the regions and ports most at risk for illicit practices, like forced labor or illegal catch, and identifies opportunities for mitigating such risks.

Turning a climate problem into a food solution

Methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, can be captured and transformed into protein-rich feed for farmed fish – an increasingly important food sector. A new analysis shows how to make the approach more cost-effective than current fish feeds.

Growing climate solutions

A bill under debate in Congress would pave the way to verifying and paying for farms’ carbon savings. Stanford scientists explore this and other opportunities for growing climate change solutions on U.S. farms.

Blue food revolution

Hunger, malnutrition and obesity affect billions of people. A first-of-its-kind comprehensive review of the so-called blue foods sector reveals challenges and opportunities for creating a healthier, more sustainable, equitable and resilient global food system.

Small fish in a big pond

Despite their massive economic and nutritional contributions, small-scale fisheries and aquaculture are often overlooked by policymakers. Drawing on profiles from around the world, researchers at Stanford and other institutions provide a blueprint for tailoring effective policy to this diverse sector.

More and different seafood in 2050

Humanity is likely to consume more fish and shellfish in the coming decades. Preparing for that future requires better data on the types of fish that people eat, sustainable expansion of aquaculture and improved understanding of the local context for the food on our plates.

Better health through blue foods

Researchers at Stanford, Harvard and other institutions around the world have developed a first-of-its-kind database highlighting so-called blue food’s nutrient richness, especially relative to the limited variation in land-based animal-source foods.