Category: Heard on Campus

Ted Koppel

Fake news takes center stage at Stanford's third Cardinal Conversations event

by Melissa De Witte on April 10, 2018 4:02 pm
Fake news and the “toxic” influences of opinion, ideology and propaganda in journalism were topics of a lively conversation at Stanford University on April 9 among journalists Anne Applebaum, Ted Koppel and Jessica Lessin. Moderated by Stanford political scientist MICHAEL MCFAUL, the discussion was part of the Cardinal Conversations initiative, a series of talks sponsored… Read more Fake news takes center stage at Stanford's third Cardinal Conversations event
Jane Kessner (left) and Kelsey Woodford

Stanford’s Religious Liberty Clinic leads two Ninth Circuit appeals

by By Stanford Law School on March 14, 2018 3:41 pm
This winter term, Religious Liberty Clinic students have represented clients in two high-profile cases pending before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. The first case involves a challenge to a state prison’s mistreatment of an inmate’s right to religious observance; the second concerns the denial of a full-time job to a retail… Read more Stanford’s Religious Liberty Clinic leads two Ninth Circuit appeals
Gretchen Carlson

Stanford alumna Gretchen Carlson returns to encourage others to 'Be Fierce'

by Stanford Libraries on March 12, 2018 2:07 pm
Former Fox News anchor and Stanford alumna GRETCHEN CARLSON returns to The Farm on Tuesday, March 13, at 6 p.m. to discuss her recently released book, “Be Fierce: Stop Harassment and Take Your Power Back.” Carlson won the 1989 Miss America pageant and graduated from Stanford with honors. After Stanford, she pursued a distinguished journalism career.  In 2016,… Read more Stanford alumna Gretchen Carlson returns to encourage others to 'Be Fierce'
Art & Feminism poster

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon focuses on making a difference

by Stanford Libraries on March 6, 2018 2:28 pm
The Bowes Art & Architecture Library will host an Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon on Thursday, March 8, which is also International Women’s Day. Students, faculty, staff and community members are encouraged to drop in anytime between 9:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. to participate. Turns out that less than 10 percent of Wikipedia contributors identify as women, according… Read more Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon focuses on making a difference
Steve Denning

What matters to Steve Denning and why

by Kate Chesley on February 8, 2018 2:46 pm
People and institutions have shaped STEVEN DENNING’s life – so much so that he feels compelled out of gratitude to give back where he can. Denning, a Stanford MBA alumnus who served as chair of the Stanford Board of Trustees until July 2017, recently spoke as part of the popular “What Matters to Me and… Read more What matters to Steve Denning and why
Syrian refugee camp

New campus-wide initiative to address Syrian refugee crisis

by Stanford School of Medicine on January 29, 2018 12:15 am
A team of Stanford researchers has launched an initiative to explore how universities can best respond to the large and growing number of Syrian refugees. Based at the Stanford Center for Innovation in Global Health, the Stanford Refugee Research Project aims to create a campus-wide collaborative of organizations and individuals committed to improving the health and well-being of… Read more New campus-wide initiative to address Syrian refugee crisis
Greg Walker

Resisting tyranny with humor: Timely lessons from the 1500s

by Tanu Wakefield on January 26, 2018 12:15 am
GREG WALKER is the Bliss Carnochan International Visitor and a professor of English literature at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. He studies late medieval and early Tudor literature and drama. His numerous books include, most recently, Imagining Spectatorship: From the Mysteries to the Shakespearian Stage (Oxford, 2016), co-authored with John J. McGavin, and Textual Distortion: Essays and… Read more Resisting tyranny with humor: Timely lessons from the 1500s
Bill Koski, Michael Wald

Homeschooling, the law and state oversight

by William S. Koski Michael S. Wald Q&A with Sharon Driscoll on January 22, 2018 10:43 am
This week, law enforcement officials in Riverside County discovered 13 siblings, malnourished and allegedly held captive, living in squalid circumstances in their parents’ home. The father had registered his home as a school and the children were reportedly homeschooled. The case raises questions about state oversight of children in alternative schooling and how cases of… Read more Homeschooling, the law and state oversight
Fake alert

‘This is not a drill’: Those 38 minutes of nuclear false alarm

by Melinda Sacks on January 16, 2018 4:00 pm
The following is from Stanford senior writer MELINDA SACKS, who was in Hawaii when the missile alert came across her phone. This is what she went through. This Saturday morning at 8:10 a.m., I was lying in bed, about to meditate. I try to do this most days. This time, I was on vacation in… Read more ‘This is not a drill’: Those 38 minutes of nuclear false alarm
Stanford

Stanford scholars named among most influential in education public policy

by Pamela Moreland on January 11, 2018 5:00 pm
The American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., put the spotlight on 200 influential scholars it said did the most to shape educational practice and policy in the past year. Stanford  scholars recognized by the AEI survey  came from a wide range of units and schools, including the Hoover Institution, the Graduate School of Education, the… Read more Stanford scholars named among most influential in education public policy