Meet the new Stanford Humanities Center fellows for 2020-21

Humanities

The Stanford Humanities Center has announced that 33 humanities scholars have been awarded fellowships for the upcoming academic year.

The Stanford scholars and their areas of interest are:

Keith Baker, the Violet Andrews Whittier Faculty Fellow, Department of History, Jean-Paul Marat: Prophet of Terror
Ksenia Ershova, the Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Participant Encoding in West Circassian
Denise Gill, Internal Faculty Fellow, Department of Music, Aurality and the Craft of Deathwork
Usha Iyer, Internal Faculty Fellow, Department of Art & Art History (Film & Media Studies), Indian Cinema and the Caribbean: Rhythmic Flows and Cultural Migrations Between South Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean
Elizabeth Jacob, Stanford Humanities Center Dissertation Prize Fellow, Department of History, Gender, Family, and the Politics of Public Motherhood in Côte d’Ivoire
Seungyeon Gabrielle Jung, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Toward a Utopia Without Revolution: Globalization, Developmentalism, and Design
Marci Kwon, Internal Faculty Fellow, Department of Art & Art History, American Art and Anthropology
Sangyop Lee, Stanford Humanities Center Dissertation Prize Fellow, Department of Religious Studies, The Soteriology of the Soul: The ‘Shen bumie’ Discourse and the Impact of Indigenous Buddhism in Early Medieval China
Daisy Leigh, Stanford Humanities Center Dissertation Prize Fellow, Department of Linguistics, Style in Time: The Online Perception of Sociolinguistic Style
Nick Mayhew, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Queer Traditions in Early Modern Russia
Bernadette Meyler, Ellen Andrews Wright Faculty Fellow, Law School, Common Law Originalism: The Constitution’s Contested Meanings
Carlos Alonso Nugent, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of English, Imagined Environments: Mediating Race and Nature in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

Michelle K. Oing, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of Art and Art History, Puppet Potential: Visual and Kinetic Mimesis in Late Medieval Sculpture, 1300-1525

Rhodes Pinto, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of Philosophy, The Treatment of Motion in Presocratic Philosophy

James Reichert, Internal Faculty Fellow, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Wages of History: Media, Ideology, and Popular Historical Fiction in Japan, 1913–1940

Amanda Reid, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of Theater and Performance Studies, To Own Ourselves: Dancing Caribbean Radicalism in Independent Jamaica

Veronica Shi, Stanford Humanities Center Dissertation Prize Fellow, Department of Classics, Writing and the Origins of Greek Intellectual Influence

Kathryn Starkey, Donald Andrews Whittier Fellow, Department of German Studies, The Stuff of Epic Poetry: Textiles and Poetics in Medieval German Literature

Alice Staveley, Internal Faculty Fellow, Department of English, Virginia Woolf: Making Books, Building Networks
John Tennant, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of Classics, Proverbial Plato: Proverbs, Gnômai, and the Reformation of Discourse in Plato’s Republic

Kerem Ussakli, Stanford Humanities Center Dissertation Prize Fellow, Department of Anthropology, Trust, Sovereignty and Social Lives of Displacement in Iraq

Leonardo Velloso-Lyons, Stanford Humanities Center Dissertation Prize Fellow, Department of Comparative Literature, Inventing the Hinterlands: Africa in the Sixteenth-Century Transatlantic Imaginary

JNese Williams, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of History, The Texture of Empire: Botanic Gardens, Science, and Governance in the British Empire, Late 18th and Early 19th Centuries

Matthew Wormer, Stanford Humanities Center Dissertation Prize Fellow, Department of the History, A Most Bewitching Luxury: Opium, Economic Thought, and the Making of Britain’s Free Trade Empire, 1773-1839

Adrien Zakar, Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in the Humanities, Department of History, Framing Perception: Landscape Images and the Politics of Geographical Information in Syria and Lebanon (1900-1946)

Read more on the Stanford Humanities website.