Victim of attack on American University of Afghanistan was former Stanford fellow

Naqib Ahmad Khpulwak
Naqib Ahmad Khpulwak

NAQIB AHMAD KHPULWAK, who studied at Stanford as a visiting fellow at Stanford Law School, was apparently killed in the attack on the American University of Afghanistan, where he was teaching law.

On Thursday, Aug. 25, national and international media reported his death, but misidentified him as a Stanford alumnus and/or a Stanford faculty member. Naqib was, in fact, a visiting fellow at Stanford Law School for six months in 2013.

The university issued the following statement to members of the media asking about his relationship to Stanford:

We are devastated to learn that Naqib Ahmad Khpulwak, who for a short time studied at Stanford as a visiting fellow at Stanford Law School, was apparently killed in the attack on the American University of Afghanistan, where he was teaching law. No Stanford students or employees were at the university at the time.

Naqib Ahmad Khpulwak was a full-time law faculty member at AUAF until last year, when he took a position managing rule of law programs at the U.S. Institute of Peace, based in Kabul. Then Naqib, a teacher at heart committed to the next generation of Afghans, moved to adjunct status on the AUAF law faculty. Naqib was a visiting fellow with us at Stanford Law School for six months in 2013, a Fulbright scholar and an extraordinarily charismatic and courageous young leader. Naqib delivered the opening prayer at the AUAF graduation ceremony last May.

Stanford Law School, with support from the U.S. Department of State, developed and continues to work with the law program for the American University of Afghanistan to educate and strengthen rule of law in Afghanistan. Stanford applauds the efforts of the faculty, students and staff at AUAF to make a difference in their country and hopes that this terrorist attack will not slow their noble efforts to educate, change and bring peace to Afghanistan. Our sympathies and best wishes go out to all of those affected by this terrible act and to all those who had worked closely with Naqib. It is a heartbreaking loss.

“Naqib was always emphatic that we — Afghans who care about the future of the country — cannot back down to insurgents and criminals who threaten a future of possibility. His death is an enormous loss to AUAF and to Afghanistan. My thoughts are with his family,” said ERIK JENSEN, professor of the practice of law at Stanford Law School and a member of the board of AUAF.

Read more on the Stanford Law School webpages.