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Health & wellness

Stanford Medicine —

Wearables data point to premature birth risk

Normal pregnancy is characterized by progressive changes in sleep and activity. When those don’t happen on a typical trajectory, it can be a warning sign for premature delivery.

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Flu shot clinics open this week

Stanford flu clinics open this week. Rich Wittman, the medical director of Stanford’s Occupational Health Clinic in Environmental Health & Safety, explains what to expect from this year’s influenza season.

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Stanford Medicine Children's Health —

What to expect at your child’s yearly well visit

It’s a chance to check in about everything from developmental milestones and social-emotional well-being to sports, nutrition, and sleep, says Stanford Medicine’s Patty Sabey.

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Stanford Engineering —

Treating mental health in the context of faith

Rania Awaad, who studies mental health in U.S. Muslim communities, says Islamic approaches offer lessons that can be applied in other religious and spiritual communities.

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Stanford Children’s Health —

A pediatric trauma nurse’s lessons from Lahaina

A pediatric trauma nurse who was evacuated from the Maui wildfires shares the plans that helped keep her family safe.

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Stanford Medicine Children's Health —

Going to school in the metaverse

For Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital patients too sick to learn in person, virtual reality lessons offer a reassuring sense of routine and unlimited field trips.

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Stanford Medicine —

Migraine 101

Neurology fellow Sheena Pillai breaks down “one of the most befuddling human conditions.”

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Stanford Medicine —

Handle with care

Stanford Medicine’s Maya Adam creates entertainment-education on topics related to maternal and child health, nutrition, and disease prevention. Her latest short film provides simple and important reminders for effectively coping with stress.

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Stanford Engineering —

The future of longevity

On The Future of Everything, David Rehkopf explains the science of longevity – and why people born in certain regions are more likely to make it to 90 or beyond.

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Stanford Medicine —

Bringing addiction care ‘inside the house of medicine’

Keith Humphreys argues that addiction should be treated as a naturally occurring health condition, and not as a human failing – particularly given that medicine was the root from which the opioid crisis grew.

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