Skip to main content

School of Medicine

Stanford Medicine —

J&J coronavirus vaccine produces low antibody response, study finds

In a head-to-head comparison of the three widely used coronavirus vaccines in the United States, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine yielded a strikingly lower antibody response in a Stanford School of Medicine-led study.

Read More
Stanford Medicine —

Men and women experience brain injuries differently

While analyzing brain trauma data from the Department of Veterans Affairs, neurosurgery Professor Odette Harris realized there was a big gender difference in the aftermath of traumatic brain injuries, and no one was talking about it.

Read More
Stanford Medicine Magazine —

Making a comeback

New ways to prevent – or even reverse – dementia, paralysis and blindness

Read More
Stanford Medicine —

Breast cancer mutations don’t lower survival rates

Newly diagnosed breast or ovarian cancer patients who carry common cancer-associated mutations have similar or better short-term survival rates than those with no mutations, researchers report.

Read More
Stanford Medicine —

Can major surgery increase risk for Alzheimer’s disease?

During cardiac surgery, patients’ blood levels of a substance highly predictive of Alzheimer’s disease jumped more than five-fold.

Read More
Stanford Medicine —

Children born early at risk from too much screen time

Children born very prematurely are at risk for cognitive and behavioral problems linked to excess screen time, a Stanford Medicine-led study shows.

Read More
Stanford Medicine —

Neuroscientist Michelle Monje awarded MacArthur ‘genius grant’

The neuroscientist and pediatric neuro-oncologist is being recognized for her work to understand healthy brain development and create therapies for a group of lethal brain tumors.

Read More
Stanford Medicine —

Karl Deisseroth wins Lasker Award

Discoveries by Deisseroth, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and of bioengineering, and his two co-recipients regarding microbial light-activated molecules led to his development of a way to manipulate selected neurons in living animals to observe changes in their behavior.

Read More
Stanford Medicine —

When can you vaccinate your kids?

Stanford pediatricians helped conduct clinical trials of COVID-19 vaccines for children. Here's what we know as the FDA prepares to consider the data.

Read More
Stanford Medicine —

Allergies to mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines rare, generally mild, Stanford-led study finds

In a study of mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine doses given at Stanford Medicine, vaccine allergies were rare, mild and mostly triggered by a vaccine additive, not the mRNA.

Read More