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School of Engineering

Stanford Engineering —

Better computer simulation can build faster, cleaner planes

Faster supercomputers and better modeling are being paired with optimized wind tunnels and flight testing to design faster, cheaper commercial planes.

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Stanford Engineering —

Tracking Polynesian exploration

Scientists from Stanford and Mexico developed advanced versions of the algorithms used to reveal people’s ancestries to show how Polynesian mariners crossed a vast ocean.

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Stanford Engineering —

Gels are changing the face of engineering … and medicine

Eric Appel explains why these “Goldilocks” materials are among the most promising areas of research today.

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Stanford Engineering —

A better way to burn methane

A surprise discovery could lead to new types of catalytic flares and cleaner-burning car engines that would keep tons of the heat-trapping gas out of the skies.

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Stanford Engineering —

How computer chips get speedier through specialization

Electrical engineer Priyanka Raina explains how we’re moving toward faster, more efficient computer chips for every task in this episode of The Future of Everything.

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Stanford Engineering —

New research looks to lower the high cost of desalination

A suite of analytical tools makes it easier for innovators to identify promising research directions in making saltwater potable.

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Stanford Engineering —

Measuring earthquakes through the internet

New technologies that detect motion in the Earth’s crust are emerging in surprising places and reshaping our understanding of earthquakes.

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Stanford News Service —

Bubbles pop like blooming flowers, new study finds

Researchers at Stanford and the University of Naples studying how bubbles form and eventually burst use high-speed cameras and analytical modeling to reveal a new popping process.

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Stanford Engineering —

Can Stanford University help solve the global semiconductor crisis?

With the U.S. poised to invest $50 billion in chip technologies, researchers prepare to create an infrastructure to accelerate how lab discoveries become practical technologies.

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Stanford Engineering —

Using nature’s miracle bugs to help feed the world

It takes massive energy to make nitrogen fertilizer – temperatures of 1,000 degrees Fahrenheit at extremely high pressure. Now, researchers at Stanford have developed a way to leverage nature’s own processes to produce plant-ready nitrogen at room temperature.

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