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School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences

Stanford News Service —

Bellwether for a drying delta

Downstream of hydroelectric dams and Alberta’s oil sands, one of the world’s largest freshwater deltas is drying out. New Stanford University research suggests long-term drying is making it harder for muskrats to recover from massive die-offs. It’s a sign of threats to come for many other species.

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School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences —

Rosemary Knight honored by Society of Exploration Geophysicists

Geophysics professor Rosemary Knight has received the highest honor of the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG), the Maurice Ewing Medal, for her contributions to the advancement of the science and profession of exploration geophysics.

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Stanford Earth —

Floods may be nearly as important as droughts for future carbon accounting

In a 34-year global analysis, researchers found that photosynthesis – an important process for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it in soil – was controlled by extreme wet events nearly as often as droughts in certain locations.

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Stanford News Service —

Venus mission

Much about Earth’s closest planetary neighbor, Venus, remains a mystery. Algorithms and techniques pioneered by Stanford Professor Howard Zebker’s research group will help to guide a search for active volcanoes and tectonic plate movements as part of a recently announced NASA mission to Venus.

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Stanford Earth —

Summer reads for saving the planet

This year’s informal survey of faculty and senior staff at Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences yielded 29 suggestions for summer reading that may inspire new reflections on the living world, spark conversations about environmental justice, or fuel critical thinking about sustainability.

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Stanford News Service —

What causes earthquake foreshocks?

Because foreshocks precede larger quakes, they have long presented the tantalizing prospect of warning of potentially damaging earthquakes. But to date, they have only been recognized in hindsight, and scientists for decades have sought to understand the physical processes that drive them. Computer modeling by Stanford geophysicists finds answers in the complex geometry of faults.

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School of Earth, Energy, & Environmental Sciences —

Stanford Earth graduates: Make your own future

Dean Stephan Graham expressed his congratulations online to the 2021 graduates of the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences (Stanford Earth), as well as his confidence in their ability to solve problems.

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School of Earth, Energy, & Environmental Sciences —

Elizabeth Miller, Sibyl Diver receive Excellence in Teaching Awards

Recipients of the school’s annual Excellence in Teaching Awards are selected based on nominations from students, faculty, and alumni.

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Stanford News Service —

Finding the ‘sweet spots’ for replenishing depleted aquifers

Rapidly worsening drought and a mandate to bring aquifer withdrawals and deposits into balance by 2040 have ignited interest in replenishing California groundwater through managed aquifer recharge. Stanford scientists demonstrate a new way to assess sites for this type of project using soil measurements and a geophysical system towed by an all-terrain vehicle.

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Stanford News —

Reinventing concrete

As the most-used building material on the planet and one of the world’s largest industrial contributors to global warming, concrete has long been a target for reinvention. Stanford scientists say replacing one concrete’s main ingredients with volcanic rock could slash carbon emissions from manufacture of the material by nearly two-thirds.

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