Seven university scholars elected fellows of eminent learned society

Mark Granovetter

Mark Granovetter

Philip C. Hanawalt

Philip C. Hanawalt

Mark Horowitz

Mark Horowitz

Mark Kelman

Mark Kelman

Herbert Lindenberger

Herbert Lindenberger

Jim Plummer

Jim Plummer

Scott D. Sagan

Scott D. Sagan

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS), one of the country's oldest honorary learned societies, announced on Monday the election of 190 new fellows and 22 new foreign honorary members, including seven scholars from Stanford University: Mark Granovetter, Philip C. Hanawalt, Mark A. Horowitz, Mark Gregory Kelman, Herbert S. Lindenberger, James D. Plummer and Scott Sagan.

Founded in 1780 by John Adams, James Bowdoin, John Hancock and other scholar-patriots, the academy "honors excellence by electing to membership remarkable men and women who have made preeminent contributions to their fields, and to the world," academy President Emilio Bizzi said in a statement. "We are pleased to welcome into the Academy these new members to help advance our founders' goal of 'cherishing knowledge and shaping the future.'"

An independent policy research center, the academy undertakes studies of complex and emerging problems. The election of this year's class brings the number of living Stanford scholars in the academy to 244.

Following is a list of Stanford's newly elected fellows:

Mark Granovetter, the Joan Butler Ford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, is perhaps best known for two papers, "The Strength of Weak Ties," which argues that weak social relationships between acquaintances are better for social networking because they can bridge gaps between more closely knit social groups, and "Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness," which argues that all economic activity is intertwined in critical ways with networks of social relationships. He has been on the faculty of Stanford's Sociology Department since 1995 and served as the department chair from 2002 to 2005. For more than 20 years, he has edited the Cambridge University Press series Structural Analysis in the Social Sciences. Granovetter is currently working on a book about the sociology of the economy and is researching the sociology of industrial organization in Silicon Valley networks and in the origins and development of the American electricity industry. Granovetter earned a bachelor's degree in American and modern European history from Princeton University and a doctorate in sociology from Harvard University.

Philip C. Hanawalt, a professor of biology, has been a researcher in the field of DNA repair since his pioneering discovery of repair replication in E. coli in 1963. Since then he has developed a number of important experimental approaches for studying the repair of DNA, which he used to document the first example of a human hereditary disease due to a deficiency in DNA repair. Hanawalt and his colleagues discovered that repair of some types of damage is selective; active genes are preferentially repaired by a special repair pathway, termed transcription-coupled repair (TCR), that operates on the transcribed strands of expressed genes. TCR was documented in mammalian cells, in E. coli and in yeast chromosomal and plasmid borne genes. The discovery of TCR in Hanawalt's laboratory has had profound implications for the fields of mutagenesis, environmental carcinogenesis, aging and risk assessment. Hanawalt is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology.

Mark Horowitz is the Yahoo! Founders Professor in the School of Engineering and the associate vice provost for graduate education. He earned a PhD from Stanford in 1984 and joined the faculty later that year. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Association for Computing Machinery, and last year he was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering. Horowitz's research interests run the gamut from using electrical engineering and computer science analysis methods to problems in molecular biology to creating new design methodologies for analog and digital integrated circuits. He has worked on many processor designs, from early RISC chips to some of the first distributed shared memory multiprocessors, and is currently working on on-chip multiprocessor designs. Recently he has worked on a number of problems in computational photography. In 1990, he took a leave from Stanford to help start Rambus Inc., a company designing high-bandwidth memory interface technology, and has continued research work in high-speed input/output at Stanford. For the past few years he has been working on creating programs to improve graduate education across all seven schools at Stanford.

Mark Gregory Kelman, the James C. Gaither Professor of Law and vice dean of the Stanford Law School, helped to develop the fledgling Law School course Thinking Like a Lawyer, designed for graduate students who don't want to be lawyers but want an overview of the field. He has been on the Stanford Law School faculty for more than 30 years and previously served as the director of Criminal Justice Projects for the Fund of the City of New York. Kelman's legal interests range from criminal law to antidiscrimination, and he has worked extensively at the intersection of law, psychology and economics. Last year's list of Brian Leiter's Law School Rankings counted Kelman as one of the most highly cited law professors in the fields of criminal law and procedure and critical theory between 2000 and 2007. Kelman earned a bachelor's degree in social studies from Harvard University and a law degree from Harvard Law School.

Herbert Lindenberger, the Avalon Foundation Professor of Humanities, Emeritus, is a leading scholar in cultural history. The professor emeritus of comparative literature and of English is a specialist in English, German and French literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. He came to Stanford in 1969 to launch the graduate program in comparative literature, which he headed until 1982. In 1991-92, he directed the Stanford Humanities Center, which he had helped launch a decade earlier. He is the author of On Wordsworth's "Prelude" (1963); Georg Buechner (1964); Georg Trakl (1971); Historical Drama: The Relation of Literature and Reality (1975); Saul's Fall: A Critical Fiction (1979), a work of experimental criticism; Opera: The Extravagant Art (1984), which applies techniques developed in literary criticism to a musical form; The History in Literature: On Value, Genre, Institutions (1990); and Opera in History: From Monteverdi to Cage (1998). Lindenberger is the recipient of Fulbright, Guggenheim, National Endowment for the Humanities and Stanford Humanities Center fellowships. He is a past president of the Modern Language Association of America.

Jim Plummer, the Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering and the John M. Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering, has worked on a variety of topics related to making silicon semiconductor devices. After joining the faculty in the 1970s, he researched high-voltage integrated circuits and device structures before turning his attention in the 1980s and 1990s to silicon-process modeling, a valuable software aid in chip manufacturing. The SUPREM system he co-developed has become a standard tool used worldwide. More recently he has focused on nanoscale silicon devices for logic and memory. He directed the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility from 1994 to 2000. Plummer became dean of the School of Engineering in 1999. Since then he has emphasized interdisciplinary research focused on bioengineering, the environment and energy, information technology, and nanoscience and nanotechnology. An example of this emphasis is the establishment of the Department of Bioengineering in 2002. The department is the only one at Stanford jointly run by two schools (Engineering and Medicine).

Scott D. Sagan, a professor of political science and co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, is a specialist on global security problems, nuclear nonproliferation and deterrence theory. He was this year's recipient of the Deborah Gerner Innovative Teaching in International Studies Award from the International Studies Association. Sagan was recognized by the association for the international-negotiation simulation that he created and has used in his Stanford courses for more than a decade and that is used now at Duke, Columbia, the University of California-Berkeley, Reed College and Dartmouth. Sagan chaired Stanford's International Relations Program from 1995 to 1997. His books include Moving Targets, The Limits of Safety and (with Kenneth Waltz) The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: A Debate Renewed. He has served as a consultant to the Sandia National Laboratory, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the National Intelligence Council, the Organization of Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He earned his bachelor's degree from Oberlin College and a doctorate in political science from Harvard University.

This article was reported and written by Massie Santos Ballon, a science-writing intern at the Stanford News Service; David Orenstein, communications and public relations manager at the Stanford School of Engineering; and staff writers Louis Bergeron and Cynthia Haven.