Honors & Awards

DAVID F. DAVIDSON

DAVID F. DAVIDSON

JOHN B. TAYLOR

JOHN B. TAYLOR

STEPHEN E. HARRIS

STEPHEN E. HARRIS

ELIF BATUMAN

ELIF BATUMAN

ROBIN EKISS

ROBIN EKISS

DAVID F. DAVIDSON, a research scientist in the Mechanical Engineering Department, has received the Kay Bradley Award for outstanding service to students. The annual award, named in honor of the department's long-serving administrative assistant who died in 1993, goes to a staff member who serves students "with the same level of professionalism, friendliness, integrity and devotion as did Kay." Davidson was nominated for his willingness to help graduate students with research or advisory questions—and for the hiking trips he leads.

KURT MUELLER-VOLLMER, professor emeritus of German studies, traveled to Berlin in June to accept a prize from the newly formed Wilhelm von Humboldt Foundation. Mueller-Vollmer is the first recipient of the prize, awarded for a lifetime of contributions to the study of Wilhelm von Humboldt, the philosopher, diplomat and linguist who was a friend of Goethe and Schiller. Mueller-Vollmer's contributions include two compendium volumes, one of which was titled Wilhelm von Humboldt and the American Languages (1994). Humboldt's unpublished papers were once thought to be lost, but Mueller-Vollmer rediscovered them and has since been the chief mover in their publication. He is currently the general editor of Humboldt's linguistic writings. The prize was conferred on the 240th anniversary of Humboldt's birth.

JOHN B. TAYLOR, the Mary and Robert Raymond Professor of Economics and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, received the Adam Smith Award from the National Association for Business Economics on Sept. 10.

Taylor, the former U.S. Treasury undersecretary for international affairs, delivered the 26th annual Adam Smith Address during the organization's annual meeting in San Francisco. Taylor was recognized for his work as a researcher, public servant and teacher for more than 30 years. At Stanford, Taylor has served as director of both the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and the Introductory Economics Center. Earlier, he taught economics at Princeton, Yale and Columbia. Taylor earned his doctorate in economics at Stanford in 1973 and his bachelor's degree at Princeton University in 1968.

STEPHEN E. HARRIS, the Kenneth and Barbara Oshman Professor in the School of Engineering and professor of applied physics, has been awarded the Harvey Prize in Science and Technology for 2007 from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. The annual award, which carries a $75,000 honorarium, is given to individuals who have "truly contributed to the progress of humanity" through breakthroughs in science, technology and human health. It will be presented to Harris at the Technion in March 2008. Harris conducts research on light, lasers and optics. The other winner of this year's Harvey Prize is Michael Grätzel of the Institute of Chemical Science and Engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He is known for his work on solar cells.

ELIF BATUMAN and ROBIN EKISS have received 2007 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers' Awards. The $25,000 awards are given annually to six women writers who demonstrate excellence and promise in the early stages of their careers. Batuman earned a doctorate in comparative literature at Stanford this year. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, n + 1 and The Nation; she has covered subjects as varied as Isaac Babel, Russian ice palaces and Thai boxing. Ekiss, who teaches in Continuing Studies, was a Stegner Fellow at Stanford from 2002 to 2005. She is finishing her first collection of poems, The Mansion of Happiness. Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The Atlantic Monthly, The American Poetry Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, TriQuarterly, The Kenyon Review, The Virginia Quarterly Review and elsewhere. Both writers live in San Francisco.